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E34 (1989 - 1995)

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  #26  
Old 09-05-2012, 02:55 PM
Josh429er Josh429er is offline
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Get it fixed soon. The doors have two thin skins, if that is rusty like that I bet the inside skin is starting to rust too. Unchecked this will lead to a new door faster than you think. Although I'm from Wisconsin, what would I know lol
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  #27  
Old 09-05-2012, 05:18 PM
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BMWFatherFigure BMWFatherFigure is offline
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That trim pulls off straight down. No clips. It fills with dirt and holds water. take them all off, clean them out and check/repair body work. Keep the door drain holes clear.
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  #28  
Old 09-06-2012, 08:36 AM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdubbs325xi View Post
Hey Byork. I would get the rust looked at as you do no want it to spread. I you are body work savvy enough, you can sand it down yourself a bit and see that it hast spread under the paint further. My brother does body work, I am going to see him tomorrow so I will ask him for his thoughts an get back to you. By the way, congrats on BMW! I have an 06 325xi and love it!
Awesome thanks a lot. That would be of great help. And yea i love it more and more each day, very happy with my purchase.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh429er View Post
Get it fixed soon. The doors have two thin skins, if that is rusty like that I bet the inside skin is starting to rust too. Unchecked this will lead to a new door faster than you think. Although I'm from Wisconsin, what would I know lol
Not what i wanted to hear but i knew rust is never good so im not surprised. Thanks for the information. Even though youre from wisconsin it still is probably true. Especially me living on the coast and our humidity almost always being 80% rust is very common here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWFatherFigure View Post
That trim pulls off straight down. No clips. It fills with dirt and holds water. take them all off, clean them out and check/repair body work. Keep the door drain holes clear.
So it just has some glue or other adhesive holding it on? How would i go about putting it back on, or are you suggesting to just leave it off? So to take them off i just grab and pull down? Thanks for the info kind sir.

Another update. Finally got the money from selling my truck so i ordered some NGK Spark plugs off eBay. During my lunch break im going to see if i can find some nice new cheap filters on their too, if not ill just get them through my work. Then it will be tune up time!
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  #29  
Old 09-06-2012, 10:19 AM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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The trim has a metal rod inside of it that allows it to bite onto the bottom of the door.
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  #30  
Old 09-16-2012, 06:07 PM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
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Gotcha. So new problem developed today. Since we finally got some rain, i decided to fix my wipers. When i bought it the driver side wiper was missing, and when i noticed it was a reverse j hook style blade i decided to tackle the problem later as i had no idea how to fix it. Well, the time has come. I found out how to modify a normal j hook style blade to work, so that is fixed. However, while using my wipers today my passeneger side blade stopped working. It doesnt fully extend, if at all. The blade seems to long and hangs over the windshield. Anyone have any ideas as to what could be my problem? I tried various blade sizes and all produced the same problem so i know it has to do with the motor or something.
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  #31  
Old 09-16-2012, 08:32 PM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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What you describe about the passenger side blade is correct. Pretty much the only blade that won't hang over are the bosch blades that came with the car.

You can try various lengths, most people just go an inch or two shorter on the passenger side.
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  #32  
Old 09-16-2012, 08:34 PM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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Read this for what people chose as their setup:
http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum....php?t=1616939
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  #33  
Old 09-24-2012, 12:59 PM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
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Muchos thanks sir. Got both sides working now. Just did my tune up over the weekend. Noticded a small but significant improvement in power and driveabilty. The old spark plugs were not copper, so i think my change attributed to that change in performance. Also ordered some lift support arms for my hood, as mine are shot. I noticed a small oil leak, but its looking like it just needs a new valve cover, so im picking that up today and fixing that issue. Next will probably be me getting some fuel injector cleaner for it. My mechanic neighbor told me about some really good stuff that dealers use and only dealers sell (not at autozone, o'riellys, advanced, ect.) I think he called it BG42 or something like that. Then, just little things over time to ehnace the drivebaility and power.
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  #34  
Old 09-25-2012, 10:54 AM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byork7 View Post
I tried that exactly and nothing happened. Ill give it another try and see if it works. My check engine light isnt always on, it usually on clicks on when im in idle or park for a small amount of time, then as soon as i give it gas it goes away.

Update:
Finally gave the car a wash. Was told it might have a small exhaust leak so i went to get it checked out and ended up putting a new cat converter and muffler on it. Just sold my truck today so this weekend is tune up and fluid change time. Pics will come as soon as it dries.

There is a long list of things that you need to check, replace or tune. PM me and I'll extract it for you.

Off the top of my head, these are the things you must do even if your existing components are working perfectly.

1. Get a new oem fuel pump. Oem only, up to $200. Do not buy anything else. Change the O ring too - $15.
2. Get and install a new cRankshaft position sensor. Oem. $80.
3. Get new fuel pump, dme, o2 sensor and ABS electrical relays. Oem only, around $10 each.
4. Get a new radiator tank cap and bleed screw. Cheap stuff. Keep the old bleed screw in your car.
5. Flush the radiator and refresh the coolant. Bleed it twice, once after the flush, and once the next morning (after having driven the car some distance in the intermediate). Use walmart coolant, this will be fine. Make sure the coolant is brightly coloured and has a strong odour - this way if any hoses burst, you'll know from the strong smell invading the cabin, which will give you enough time to take inspect and maybe action before the engine overheats. The bright colour makes it easier to spot leaks. The oem coolant has a very weak smell and is pale blue in colour so its not useful.
6. (not essential but) Probably a good idea to change the fuel filter. $15. Too many people fail to do this. Keep the old filter, rinse it out in water, and use it for the next change interval.
7. When you flush your radiator, take a look at the inside of the upper and lower radiator hoses. If they are caked with rust (not the same as a light coat), then change the two hoses to new ones, and flush the radiator once every two weeks for 2 months.
8. Have your car battery's CCA (cold cranking amps), or Reserve charge, tested at a battery shop. This can only be done with an **digital** battery tester, not the analogue ones. If its under 20% its probably a great idea to replace it (and if its under 50% you should have the battery tested once every 3-6 months). Use the opportunity to get them to give you an opinion on how well the alternator is doing, the tests involve the same meter and take just 3-4 minutes.
9. Check all of your engine belts and replace those which appear to have cracks on the ribbed side of the belts.
10. Keep an assorted bunch of spare fuses in your car's fuse box.

The consequences of not doing the above (with the exception of the belts, radiator stuff and some of the relays) will be your car suddenly failing to start suddenly, with little or no warning that its about to do that beforehand. The fixes involved are not quick and simple. You can be stranded somewhere or be really embarrassed. You are driving an old car, which has the advantage of being cheap and of having most problems already identified. The above are the common problems which lead to no-start situations. It will cost you a pretty penny to do all of the above but overall you're still spending very little on an old car and as you say constantly, its in great shape which is not common. And if you wonder why you are replacing perfectly good parts, have your car towed once or twice and get a shop to charge you to fix problems while you are in a jam and the phrase "penny wise, pound foolish" will hit home like never before. Furthermore, the overwhelming inconvenience of being stuck when you need the car can be avoided, pretty much permanently.

Doing all of the above still means that you've got a cheap car, so its well worth it. And judging by the number of no-start threads on bimmerfest, it is clearly a smart thing to do. As mentioned, these are common and well known issues with our model at this age.

There are only 3 situations where you need not do the above if you don't feel like it :

1. You do not intend to keep the car for longer than 6 months.
2. You have physical proof or RELIABLE assurances that any of the above repairs were done within the past 2-4 years.
3. This is a spare car and you hardly drive it as well.

Not having enough money is not a good reason to forestall all of the above. The cost benefit analysis does not compute.

Along the way you should have all of your fluids, seals and your suspension components inspected after your car has been winched up at a shop. Also check everywhere for rust. See if you have a valve cover oil leak, see if you have a head gasket oil leak (these need not be nightmare scenarios). Have your fuel hoses and brake hoses checked for cracks. All these are observable issues and will not cost money in terms of diagnostic time. Get the shop to take out a little bit of your tranny and rear diff fluid and see how clean it is...if they look good they need not be replaced.

Since this is an m20 engine, have them remove your timing cover and inspect your timing belt and replace it ASAP together with the timing bearings if it does not look good. Unless you have proof that this has been done at a specific interval, I would recommend that you replace it anyway for pure peace of mind. A snapped timing belt during driving means your engine is destroyed. And have your water pump and fan clutch checked for bearing looseness and if its there, change it out within the next 6 months unless the mechanic advises against it based on his on-site assessment. In any case, if you change your timing belt, change your water pump as well as it has the same wear and tear interval and this keeps things simpler. Only purchase water pumps with a metal or composite/fiberglass impeller (preferable to the metal one). Do not buy one with the plastic impeller. O'Reilly's has a nice composite water pump online with a lifetime warranty. Nice !

Be anal about this inspection with a professional mechanic....I would have done this before confirming the car. If you find problems after an undercarriage inspection, you can always let us know and we'll help you prioritise or at least buy the right stuff...there's alot of junk out there. This inspection would take around 30 minutes of shop time so their charges might not be much and they might even do it for free if you are going to be a regular customer or you're having something else done there. Since the car is winched up anyway, it would be a good idea to replace that fuel filter right off. Its a 10 minute job. Maybe the labour for that will cover the cost of your inspection as well.

Oh and btw while the car is winched up, check on all of your tyres for signs of abnormal wear. If that is found, it could indicate alignment problems or more rarely, busted subframe bushings (very expensive repair but fortunately fairly uncommon). Have the tyres rotate if slight wear marks are appearing on the inside or corresponding tyres. And ensure that your tyres are not more than 3.5 years old....at the 4 year mark they must be replaced (tyres have a 5 year lifespan). I recently had the incredible experience of a tyre shop clown trying to sell me a single use tyre that was 7 years old ! Jerk. So this needs to be double checked.

I think that's the whole bucket list on the E34 so no need for that pm

Oh btw, congrats dude! You've got a great ride! Goto youtube and do searches for e34 commercials. There are a couple of old e34 tv commercials there, and they are still pretty cool.


rgds,
Roberto

p.s. Just scanned a few of the earlier posts. Looks like you've done the undercarriage inspection. Apologies if I've repeated anything unnecessarily.
p.p.s. This may be a useful thread : http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...&highlight=m20

Last edited by robertobaggio20; 09-25-2012 at 04:08 PM.
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  #35  
Old 09-25-2012, 10:57 AM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Oh btw get please search for and download the soft copy of the Bentley manual for E34s. Its worth having and its an interesting read. And please do read through the sticky threads for mechanical stuff at the top of the forum.

Last edited by robertobaggio20; 09-25-2012 at 11:23 AM.
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  #36  
Old 09-25-2012, 03:56 PM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byork7 View Post
Muchos thanks sir. Got both sides working now. Just did my tune up over the weekend. Noticded a small but significant improvement in power and driveabilty. The old spark plugs were not copper, so i think my change attributed to that change in performance. Also ordered some lift support arms for my hood, as mine are shot. I noticed a small oil leak, but its looking like it just needs a new valve cover, so im picking that up today and fixing that issue. Next will probably be me getting some fuel injector cleaner for it. My mechanic neighbor told me about some really good stuff that dealers use and only dealers sell (not at autozone, o'riellys, advanced, ect.) I think he called it BG42 or something like that. Then, just little things over time to ehnace the drivebaility and power.

In the tune up category of things :

1. Check that all engine belts are properly tensioned. They should be tight to the touch. Loose belts rob your engine of power. Use belt spray on the belts and see the difference in its performance...that's what tight belts will do for you.

2. Replace air filter. If the current one looks ok, dust it off. You can also soak it in laundry detergent for an hour and rinse off with running water. Drip dry and reinstall even if damp. It will dry out in normal driving. No danger to the engine.

3. Clean out your throttle body. Remove main air hose and spray carb cleaner into the butterfly valve area to eliminate any crud. Inspect the air hose for any cracks before your reinstall it. If there are cracks, purchase a new one, its fairly cheap.

4.1 Do a diesel flush on your engine. Add 1 quart to your crankcase with the old oil, run the engine at idle for 15 minutes, then drain and replace oil and oil filter. Do this each time you service your car.

4.2 Use the correct oil rating for your engine, or use something slightly thicker at first and then see how it feels when you switch back to the correct rating down the line. If the thicker oil feels better, stick with that. If they both feel the same, switch back to the recommended rating.

5. Do a diesel fuel system flush. Add between 1-3 quarts of diesel to a nearly empty fuel tank, and then immediately fill up to full with regular. This causes the fuels to mix. Then drive normally. The diesel in the tank will clean out your fuel injectors better than any injector cleaner....and for the same price, you'll get a much higher volume of cleaner. If this is the first time you're doing this for your car, add diesel for 2-3 consecutive fillups. Thereafter, do this once each time you service your car.

6. Go for a WOT (wide open throttle) run on your car. Get those rpms to the 5k zone and hold it there for 15 minutes. If you cannot do this at safe speeds where you live, switch your transmission down to 4th or 3rd gear to get the rpms up.

7. Seafoam's effects are psychological. Any real benefit to the car comes from the fluid mixing with the engine oil and thinning it out. You can get the same effect by adding 500ml of dex3/4 transmission fluid to your engine. Its perfectly safe and will thin down the oil, giving you a short term boost. Marvel mystery oil works the same way too. I've tried all of that to no genuine effect.

8. Instead of adding sea foam to the engine, add a mixture of 50% ethanol and 50% water to the intake manifold via a tube fed into the brake booster's usual fitting. Anything from 1-3 quarts will be fine. Start the engine and hold the rpms at 1500. Hold the open end of the tube right at the surface of the mixture, without dipping into it entirely...the mixture will be sucked in via the engine's vacuum through the hose, and it will do some cleaning of your intake manifolds from the inside. Hold it at that position until you get the hang of it. Don't worry, you won't hydrolock your engine. Some water will enter your engine though and you might find the oil under the crankcase cap and dipstick a little milky...do not worry, anything from 15-60 minutes of total driving time depending on how much mixture you used, will vapourise and expel the water naturally through the crankcase ventilation system. There will always be water in the air and in oil so your engine will not be damaged. You don't need to do this immediately either, just go for a drive within 24 hours. You can drive normally i.e. hard. No issues.

9. You have the M20 engine, right? There was a post I spotted on bimmerfest a long...long time ago, which showed that seriously thick crud accumulates around the two bends of the intake manifold...the first bend midway and the second bend where it connects to the cylinder head. It was a nightmarish picture, and the poster concerned didn't realise anything was wrong at first...he had dismantled it in the process of getting to the head gasket, then saw the abomination and alerted us....I would very strongly advise you to pick up some new intake manifold gaskets, dismantle it and clean it out thoroughly using a flexible probe and lots of flushing. It will surely improve the airflow into your engine and thus your performance and mileage.

When you reinstall the manifold, make sure you use a torque wrench and have the bolts torqued down according to the Bentley manual's recommendations, and in the correct sequence. (This is highly important for the valve cover gasket (vcg) too ).

10. Check on your valve clearances when you do the valve cover gasket. Gap them and tune them up properly. They would have run out for sure. This makes a very noticeable difference to the performance and smoothness of the engine. The Bentley manual has details.

11. Unless you have evidence that the ignition coil assembly/ ignition distributor/ distributor cap / thingamajig and the spark plug wires were recently changed, purchase a whole new one. OEM. Would usually improve performance slightly, and eliminate problems due to degraded wiring. Around $200. I would only get to this after everything else has been cleared.

12. Use 4-claw spark plugs for better performance and longevity. Do not change them for the next 100k miles. Seriously. Bosch plat+4 will do the trick. However, take them out at least once a year and just inspect them.....spark plug burn marks can sometimes alert you to other forms of engine issues (please google). I believe you purchased the denso plugs, if they were the iridium versions you're good for the next 100k miles there too. An esteemed member of these forums once ran stock spark plugs on his e36 m50 (same engine as on the later versions of the e34) for almost 180k miles, with no real issues. As long as the engine's condition is normal, your spark plugs may only require light cleaning on ocassion. The iridium ones don't even require that.

13. Make sure your tyres are properly inflated. Ebay sells a neat solar powered hand held digital tyre pressure gauge. Something like under $10 shipped. Hang on to that. Make it an unconscious habit to scan your tyres' standing road bulge from time to time to sense problems early, then use the gauge to confirm. In any case, check the pressure every 2 months.

14. Autozone will scan your car's computer for free (or is that only for obd2 cars?). If the stomp test does not work, don't bother, just head right over there and get that checked. After you've had the codes read and noted, clear them on your car. The code reader can do this, or you can unplug your ecu for 5 minutes. Don't be too worried if you find many codes, some of them are very old ones. After they are deleted, recheck your codes about 1 week later. If the earlier codes have reappeared, then you do have a problem and need to decide what (if at all) you're going to do about it.

15. Use a vacuum pressure gauge to see if you have an vacuum losses on your engine, and if so, do your best to trace it. Youtube has many videos on how to use this gauge. It is cheap...under $30 shipped.

16. ** COMMENTS INVITED TO CONFIRM OR DENY ** : After everything has been done, please retune your engine by playing with your air flow meter (google for detailed writeups with pictures). There is a little allen-key bolt over on that afm that you can turn clockwise and anti clockwise to fine tune your idling and get the perfect note. You should do this after everything on this list has been done for two reasons : (a) by then you would have totally gotten to know your engine and how it sounds under various conditions intuitively, which is important for this "tuning fork" type tuning, and (b) anything else that might affect the engine has been replaced, cleaned out or upgraded. This should be the very last step. And it is reversible. The target, is to make it sound as sweet as possible when at idle. What does that mean? You'll know it when you hear it. You can only determine this after you've had your car and worked on it for a couple of weeks, so only do this at the very end.

cheers, Roberto

Last edited by robertobaggio20; 09-26-2012 at 12:05 AM.
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  #37  
Old 09-25-2012, 10:15 PM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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GREAT LIST!

The only thing I disagree with is your choice of spark plugs. I would always go with the good old copper ones since these older engines designed in the 70's respond better to copper than to the fancy new metals.
It is pretty much the same thing except that the new metals are meant to last longer. I think running the stock copper plugs are best though.
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  #38  
Old 09-25-2012, 11:06 PM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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The engine may have been designed in the 70s but the ignition system and everything else has been updated over time. There is no apparent reason why it should respond better to copper ones, unless they generate a bigger spark etc for some reason. Can you advise me on why you believe it to be so?

In any case, the copper ones are ok. Get 2 or 4 claw copper ones. Then pull them out once every 12-18 months for an inspection, cleanup, and A light sand down of any accumulate crud on the tips, before reinstallation.

Last edited by robertobaggio20; 09-25-2012 at 11:17 PM.
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  #39  
Old 09-26-2012, 12:12 AM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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I don't know why, but the general consensus is that the new metal plugs cause the M20/30 engines to have decreased performance.

Maybe its a personal preference thing, but people have complained about the new plugs as of late, and people have not complained about copper plugs for the past 30 years.
My opinion is based on the experience of others and not empirical evidence. I would imagine it to be hard to test this kind of thing, so go figure.
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  #40  
Old 09-26-2012, 06:16 AM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Originally Posted by paperplane94 View Post
I don't know why, but the general consensus is that the new metal plugs cause the M20/30 engines to have decreased performance.

Maybe its a personal preference thing, but people have complained about the new plugs as of late, and people have not complained about copper plugs for the past 30 years.
My opinion is based on the experience of others and not empirical evidence. I would imagine it to be hard to test this kind of thing, so go figure.
Well, anecdotal evidence has its value as well. Hmm.
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  #41  
Old 09-26-2012, 07:02 AM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Radian has posted an outstanding writeup on important to-dos when it comes to adjusting your valve clearances. He includes certain better-than-oem suggestions, that were not available when the engine was originally built all those moons ago. Please see :

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=487113
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  #42  
Old 09-26-2012, 10:18 AM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
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^ Alas, 'tis for an M30.

I wish somebody knew the cam to rocker lobe measurment for the M20...
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  #43  
Old 09-27-2012, 10:11 AM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
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Wow thanks a ton for all the information. That will really help me getting my car where i want it to be. Yea this is the older OBD1 and Autozone only does OBD2 (my side job as at auto zone) but no worries. Cool sounds like i have a lot to work on over these next few months. What would you recommend i start on first? I have a 2 week old baby, 2 jobs and go to school full time so i dont have a lot of time to work on my car. But, i do make time for it so i will be starting on your list as soon as possible. So its perfectly safe to put a few gallons of diesel in my engine? Also, why do you suggest the diesel engine flush? Would you recommend this for any other brand vehicle, or is this particular to BMW engines? Thanks again for all the information, its a huge help.
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  #44  
Old 09-27-2012, 10:44 AM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Originally Posted by Byork7 View Post
Wow thanks a ton for all the information. That will really help me getting my car where i want it to be. Yea this is the older OBD1 and Autozone only does OBD2 (my side job as at auto zone) but no worries. Cool sounds like i have a lot to work on over these next few months. What would you recommend i start on first? I have a 2 week old baby, 2 jobs and go to school full time so i dont have a lot of time to work on my car. But, i do make time for it so i will be starting on your list as soon as possible. So its perfectly safe to put a few gallons of diesel in my engine? Also, why do you suggest the diesel engine flush? Would you recommend this for any other brand vehicle, or is this particular to BMW engines? Thanks again for all the information, its a huge help.

I did not say a few gallons of diesel. Anything from 1-3 quarts, on an empty or nearly empty tank, with an immediate top up of regular gasoline. I.e. you are moving from one pump to the adjacent one and doing this. This cleans our your fuel system all the way to the injectors and is worth alot more than the couple of ounces that you get with commercial FI cleaners. higher volume of cleaner = better cleaning. Figures.

The diesel crankcase flush can be done on any vehicle as well. This is an engine flush. It should be obvious why an engine flush is a good thing. 1 quart of diesel is really cheap and since you're only using it every time you change your oil out at 12k-15k miles (if you are using fully synthetic fluid) it is a mild expense and inconvenience.

Your first priority is to kill all the no start issues. Source for an purchase all of the items on line. When you have them ready, get to them immediately. If you had intended to do your engine belts, WP and fan clutch, do those as well together with the CPS swop as you'll be removing the fan clutch and shroud and that makes replacing the CPS much easier. The CPS swop, fuel pump/pump o ring swop, electrical relays, fan clutch, water pump and (for good measure and because it is like only $20) the thermostat, should take a skilled diyer about 4 hours at a relaxed pace with adjournments to the BBQ set up nearby. Oh yes, get a new rad cap, bleed screw, flush out your radiator, and use cheap, birghtly coloured and strong smelling coolant from walmart. Like I said, will only take you around 4 hours to do all of the above so you can sort it out in one weekend.

This will pretty much eliminate all of the known and common no-start issues with your car, along with a partial refresh of your cooling system which is the next biggest annoyance with our baby.

Then, you can do all the other things down the line when you have time to inspect the car's undercarriage and have strategised everything you wish to do and when.

Please read through the sticky threads at the top of the forums for more useful information.

Read through Bentley's procedures on each repair before you do anything, and its a great idea to have a reliable torque wrench and extra hose clamps on hand to do things the right way first time.

Oh and btw get and keep a set of car fuses in a plastic bag, in the fuse box. Anything electrical that stops working, the fuse box is where you should check first and swopping out the busted fuse usually fixes the problem permanently. If the fuse keeps blowing, then you've got a component problem and you need to think about that.

rgds, Roberto


p.s. Change the upper and lower rad hoses if their internals are caked with rust or they feel too hard and brittle to the touch. The hoses will run you $20 each and last for 10 years so its no biggie.
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  #45  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:09 PM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
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Location: Texas
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 31
Mein Auto: 1990 525i
Haha whoops, my mistake. The lack of sleep may be getting to me. Yes 1-3 quarts makes much more sense. Ill be needing to fill up in the next day or two, so i will do this then. For the time being, im going to see if i can get my hands on some relays and a fuel pump off eBay (unless you recommend another website). Also, a question to whoever might be able to answer it. My E34 has a keyless entry system, but i was wanting to update the clickers. Both of mine are old, square and pretty beat up. The circuit board inside is rather big and trying to fit it in to another type key/clicker would be hard if not impossible. Would anyone know how i would go about making replacement clickers work? I assume as long as i can get my new clickers to activate the relay that unlocks my car and disarms the alarm ill be fine, but i have no idea how to do that. I should be sleeping as i have work in a few hours, but since i finally have free time im going to read through the stickies and search for parts. Very glad i stumbled upon this forum.
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  #46  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:44 PM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Location: earth
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,403
Mein Auto: car
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byork7 View Post
Haha whoops, my mistake. The lack of sleep may be getting to me. Yes 1-3 quarts makes much more sense. Ill be needing to fill up in the next day or two, so i will do this then. For the time being, im going to see if i can get my hands on some relays and a fuel pump off eBay (unless you recommend another website). Also, a question to whoever might be able to answer it. My E34 has a keyless entry system, but i was wanting to update the clickers. Both of mine are old, square and pretty beat up. The circuit board inside is rather big and trying to fit it in to another type key/clicker would be hard if not impossible. Would anyone know how i would go about making replacement clickers work? I assume as long as i can get my new clickers to activate the relay that unlocks my car and disarms the alarm ill be fine, but i have no idea how to do that. I should be sleeping as i have work in a few hours, but since i finally have free time im going to read through the stickies and search for parts. Very glad i stumbled upon this forum.
Only buy from Ebay if its marked oem. For our fuel pumps, the OEM manufacturers were Bosch and Piersburg. The oem for electrical relays were Bosch. OEM for crank sensors was Valeo (not sure). Ebay may be suspect sometimes, if you're not too familiar with names as yet. Suggest you goto websites such as rockauto and pelican parts. It might be pricier (not always actually) but these are items that you change once in 10 years so its well worth paying more for it. And if you purchase everything at one spot, you'll get shipping combined. Furthermore, these guys also sell things like seals, belts, etc, and you may get volume discounts.

No clue about your keyless system I'm afraid. Good night.
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  #47  
Old 10-04-2012, 10:43 AM
Byork7 Byork7 is offline
Popeye
Location: Texas
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 31
Mein Auto: 1990 525i
Just ordered a fuel pump, OEM of course. Next up will be the crankshaft sensor, possibly TPS as well. I just need to find the TPS sensor in my engine so i know for sure which one to get. Also, installed some new lift supports for my hood so it now stays open on its own (so nice to not have to prop it open). It idles rough sometimes, and i want to clean out the ICV. However, i am not 100% sure where it is. I am however 99% sure it is right in front of me, at the top of my engine. I looked in the bentley manual and couldnt find anything.



This is not my engine,but a pic i found on google of the same engine. Its the piece with two hoses, one going to the intake and the other going to the air box. Correct? If so, how do i get it off? Just pry it off like the hulk?
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  #48  
Old 10-04-2012, 03:55 PM
paperplane94 paperplane94 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Los Angeles, CA
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 927
Mein Auto: 1989 525i M20B25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byork7 View Post
Just ordered a fuel pump, OEM of course. Next up will be the crankshaft sensor, possibly TPS as well. I just need to find the TPS sensor in my engine so i know for sure which one to get. Also, installed some new lift supports for my hood so it now stays open on its own (so nice to not have to prop it open). It idles rough sometimes, and i want to clean out the ICV. However, i am not 100% sure where it is. I am however 99% sure it is right in front of me, at the top of my engine. I looked in the bentley manual and couldnt find anything.



This is not my engine,but a pic i found on google of the same engine. Its the piece with two hoses, one going to the intake and the other going to the air box. Correct? If so, how do i get it off? Just pry it off like the hulk?
First, your TPS is directly under the throttle body. It has a 3-pin connector coming out of it.

Your ICV is circled below:


If there are no clamps then the hoses just pop off their barbs. BTW the other end connects to the intake boot, not the airbox.
Clean it out with carb cleaner. Let it soak for a couple mins. Make sure the vane inside rotates freely. Also check the Bentley manual for resistance specifications, the exact numbers escape me atm.

Last edited by paperplane94; 10-04-2012 at 09:17 PM.
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  #49  
Old 10-04-2012, 08:28 PM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Mein Auto: car
When you pull off the main air hose (the bigger of the two that you mentioned) from the side on the engine, the first piece of round metal that you'll see will be the throttle body. There should be a hinge next to it that's connect with a metal cable which leads all the way back to the accelerator pedal, that you can just push down with your hands. That opens the butterfly valve and you'll be able to spray carb cleaner everywhere in order to clean it up.

Youtube surely has videos on stuff like this and probably for your specific engine. Youtube has videos on everything.

Why do you need to purchase a new tps ? Are you getting persistent error codes ? Usually, thus cleaning it and the connector with contact cleaner, applying dieletric grease to it and fixing it back would be all that you need to do. Do that, clear any error codes that might still be there, and then see if things make a difference.

The better thing to do would be to purchase a torque wrench, the requisite tools for resetting valve clearances, and to purchase intake manifold gaskets for when you remove your intake manifold to give it a good internal clearning.

Here are two threads that would persuade you better on the importance of this. Bear in mind that the dudes who posted this were going after other problems and only spotted the dirt in the intake manifold along the way :

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=528017

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=486999

The crud in there was not caused by the issues that they faced with their engines. It builds up naturally over time.
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  #50  
Old 10-04-2012, 09:59 PM
Hunter8511 Hunter8511 is offline
Registered User
Location: Lodi, California
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 19
Mein Auto: 1990 525i (E34)
Hey, congrats on the car buy! I just purchased the same year and model and love it and are going through the same thing you are. Systematically changing everything when I can afford it. However, and people who know more then me please confirm. But hold on buying the new TPS for the stomp test issue.

The 1990 525i, doesn't have a stomp test feature. That didn't become available until the 1992 models. You can find the thread here, I read it from one of the sticky's "mechanical things you should know...". Its the first post under "stomp test procedure"

Again, BMW specialists that are on here, if I'm wrong post, that way I know, he knows, and its confirmed. Hope I help and thanks guys.

Last edited by Hunter8511; 10-04-2012 at 10:04 PM.
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