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  #126  
Old 01-11-2013, 01:03 AM
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Originally Posted by MCSL View Post
WhatsApp Messenger released a new beta update,v2.9.526, for your BlackBerry. WhatsApp Messenger is a multi-platform messaging app that allows you to use your smartphone data plan to contact friends, family and whomever you pick without the need for a minutes or texting plan.

Download this app to send videos, imagines and voice notes to all your contacts. If you so desire, you can even make group conversations with multiple friends. You can also block contacts, share your location, customize notifications, email chat history and even broadcast messages to all the contacts you select.

http://nerdberry.net/2013/01/10/what...d-to-v2-9-471/

http://www.whatsapp.com/faq/en/bb

http://blog.whatsapp.com/

http://www.whatsapp.com/

http://appworld.blackberry.com/webstore/content/2360/

It is available but if you travel often you will find that this application does not work so well on the Blackberry device as you will find that when a local person sends you the message in the local language the fonts don't always appear and a copy/paste to translate does not work well with this application. If it is being used just in English in the US then it works fine but otherwise not so. Hopefully they addressed this issue in the new OS10 or businessmen and travelers will find that RIMM has not done much to improve.
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  #127  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:24 AM
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I had mentioned before of how Evernote was bad and others that are similar and now I see this article out there about stuff like what I had said.

http://news.yahoo.com/computer-scien...045327563.html

“Today I have on my desk a smartphone, a tablet, and a Mac computer,” explains Lixia Zhang, a computer scientist at UCLA. “To move data between them, the request goes all the way to the cloud — God knows where that is — so it can come back here to another device that is two feet away… That is wrong, it is simply wrong.”

she could use something else other than a cloud.
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  #128  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:27 AM
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It is available but if you travel often you will find that this application does not work so well on the Blackberry device as you will find that when a local person sends you the message in the local language the fonts don't always appear and a copy/paste to translate does not work well with this application. If it is being used just in English in the US then it works fine but otherwise not so. Hopefully they addressed this issue in the new OS10 or businessmen and travelers will find that RIMM has not done much to improve.
why is it only when traveling? what if you are not traveling but just using different languages? the the good folks at whatsapp not doing enough for making their application work for various/obscure languages?
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  #129  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:32 AM
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looks to be quite the hardware. any pricing on this? is the hardware for the hardcore and top 1%'ers? and will apple even be able to compete against this spec sheet?
Nothing on pricing yet. Probably coming to AT&T (they've been getting all the other XPERIAs) for the usual $199 on 2 yr contract.

I don't think it's only for the hardcore. 1080p, 2gb ram, quad-core is supposed to be the basic specs of all the flagship Android phones for '13. The Galaxy S4 is going to be similar, but I'm leaning towards the Sony because of the waterproofing.

Apple? I doubt it. Let's see.

Quote:
honestly, the best thing that they can do for themselves right now is to put out a super duper high end phone with all this fixin's that is only marketed to the 0.1% top income earners to drum up sales.
They just need to market the damn thing. Samsung has become a marketing powerhouse with the Galaxy S3. And the S4 is only going to be become more popular. If they want to even be considered, they have to market it. Especially show off the waterproofing. Something Sammy probably won't do with their S4.
  #130  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:32 AM
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why is it only when traveling? what if you are not traveling but just using different languages? the the good folks at whatsapp not doing enough for making their application work for various/obscure languages?
I think it might be just a RIM problem. I've used whatsapp on my iOS and Android devices. It works with all languages perfectly.
  #131  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:34 AM
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I think it might be just a RIM problem. I've used whatsapp on my iOS and Android devices. It works with all languages perfectly.
are you trying to claim that RIMM wrote whatsapp? am i missing something? and which language has shown this problem?
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Last edited by HW; 01-11-2013 at 07:36 AM.
  #132  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:35 AM
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are you trying to claim that RIMM wrote whatsapp? am i missing something?
No. I'm just saying BB has a hard time with different languages. It's evident in Whatsapp because you can message people all over the world. iOS and Android don't.
  #133  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:44 AM
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No. I'm just saying BB has a hard time with different languages. It's evident in Whatsapp because you can message people all over the world. iOS and Android don't.
i would not be surprised that there are separate source code #defines and coding specifics for each iOS, Android, Windows, symbian and BB for whatsapp. likely, the source code is lacking in completion for some platforms.

this is like pulling the oem entertainment unit out of your audi and slapping in a pioneer unit and complaining that audi doesn't play *mkv files.
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  #134  
Old 01-11-2013, 07:47 AM
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i would not be surprised that there are separate source code #defines and coding specifics for each iOS, Android, Windows, symbian and BB for whatsapp. likely, the source code is lacking in completion for some platforms.
Yeah, this could be possible. Maybe it's just missing certain region's language packs. Could be as simple as a downloadable add-on
  #135  
Old 01-11-2013, 09:55 AM
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she could use something else other than a cloud.
Before you could sync notes using iTunes between an iPad and a MacBook Pro or iMac but now you can not sync between the two after recent updates. They make you upload your Notes to the server and then download them from the other device. Pathetic if you ask me. All the sudden we need a middle man for all this that charges us a yearly commission fee and gets to know all of our secrets or notes. Not my cup of tea. I prefer the old standard sync option.
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  #136  
Old 01-11-2013, 09:57 AM
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why is it only when traveling? what if you are not traveling but just using different languages? the the good folks at whatsapp not doing enough for making their application work for various/obscure languages?
Works fine various languages and copy paste options under Apple's IOS and under Google's just not under Blackberry's.
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  #137  
Old 01-11-2013, 10:50 PM
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Before you could sync notes using iTunes between an iPad and a MacBook Pro or iMac but now you can not sync between the two after recent updates. They make you upload your Notes to the server and then download them from the other device. Pathetic if you ask me. All the sudden we need a middle man for all this that charges us a yearly commission fee and gets to know all of our secrets or notes. Not my cup of tea. I prefer the old standard sync option.
iCloud is free and encrypted. Instant sync between all devices.

It seems as though you like to plug in your device to a computer to sync? That seems pretty 2005 to me, back to early palm pilot days
  #138  
Old 01-11-2013, 11:15 PM
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iCloud is free and encrypted. Instant sync between all devices.

It seems as though you like to plug in your device to a computer to sync? That seems pretty 2005 to me, back to early palm pilot days
Actually it is pretty old time that one needs to download a picture from another server and pay for it when the picture that they took on their device should remain on their device. It is pathetic that one needs to go through someone else (third party) just to be able to sync between their own devices. Not sure why I need to bring in a third party,share my info with them and pay them when the info should be just between my own devices at home or at work
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  #139  
Old 01-11-2013, 11:21 PM
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Actually it is pretty old time that one needs to download a picture from another server and pay for it when the picture that they took on their device should remain on their device. It is pathetic that one needs to go through someone else (third party) just to be able to sync between their own devices. Not sure why I need to bring in a third party,share my info with them and pay them when the info should be just between my own devices at home or at work
Let's use the iPhone as an example

iCloud advantages:
Free
Instant sync of pictures between devices, as well as backed up to your web connected PC or Mac, for FREE
Shared photostreams with friends
Encrypted Cloud Backup of device
Lose device, pictures are saved

Old School Sync
Plug phone into PC or Mac, Sync, then do the same with the next device.

You can have it your way, but to me it makes no sense. I had a friend spend a week in Maui, attended her sisters wedding, took tons of pics... phone was lost on the last day. She realized she had iCloud enabled, her precious memories were safe. A hardwired sync would have required she take along a laptop or she would have simply been out of luck.

Same goes for Android and Picasa or Google Plus and Dropbox

Last edited by GeneArch; 01-11-2013 at 11:22 PM.
  #140  
Old 01-12-2013, 12:06 AM
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Confirmed BlackBerry 10 Carriers so far

US
• AT&T (GSM)
• T-Mobile (GSM)
• Verizon (CDMA)
• Sprint (CDMA)

Canada
• Rogers
• Bell
• Telus
• Virgin
• Koodo
• Mobilicity
• Wind
• SaskTel

UK
• Carphone Warehouse
• Phones4U
• EE
• O2
• Three
• Vodafone
• T-Mobile

Australia
• Telstra
  #141  
Old 01-12-2013, 12:07 AM
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Two basic technologies in mobile phones, CDMA and GSM represent a gap you can't cross. They're the reason you can't use AT&T phones on Verizon's network and vice versa. But what does CDMA vs. GSM really mean for you?

CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) and GSM (Global System for Mobiles) are shorthand for the two major radio systems used in cell phones. Both acronyms tend to group together a bunch of technologies run by the same entities. In this story, I'll try to explain who uses which technology and what the real differences are.

Which Carries are CDMA? Which are GSM?

Five of the top seven carriers in the U.S. use CDMA: Verizon Wireless, Sprint, MetroPCS, Cricket, and U.S. Cellular.

AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM.

That means we're mostly a CDMA country. It also means we're not part of the norm, because most of the world is GSM. The global spread of GSM came about because in 1987, Europe mandated the technology by law, and because GSM comes from an industry consortium. What we call CDMA, by and large, is owned by chipmaker Qualcomm. This made it less expensive for third parties to build GSM equipment.

There are several variants and options carriers can choose, like toppings on their technological ice cream. In this story we'll be talking about U.S. networks.

What CDMA vs. GSM Means to You

For call quality, the technology you use is much less important than the way your carrier has built its network. There are good and bad CDMA and GSM networks, but there are key differences between the technologies. Here's what you, as a consumer, need to know.

It's much easier to swap phones on GSM networks, because GSM carriers put customer information on a removable SIM card. Take the card out, put it in a different phone, and the new phone now has your number. What's more, to be considered GSM, a carrier must accept any GSM-compliant phone. So the GSM carriers don't have total control of the phone you're using.

That's not the case with CDMA. In the U.S., CDMA carriers use network-based white lists to verify their subscribers. That means you can only switch phones with your carrier's permission, and a carrier doesn't have to accept any particular phone onto its network. It could, but typically, U.S. carriers choose not to.

In other words, you can take an unlocked AT&T phone over to T-Mobile (although its 3G may not work well because the frequency bands are different). You can't take a Verizon phone over to Sprint, because Sprint's network rejects non-Sprint phones.

3G CDMA networks (known as "EV-DO" or "Evolution Data Optimized") also, generally, can't make voice calls and transmit data at the same time. Once more, that's an available option (known as "SV-DO" for "Simultaneous Voice and Data Optimization"), but one that U.S. carriers haven't adopted for their networks and phones.

On the other hand, all 3G GSM networks have simultaneous voice and data, because it's a required part of the spec. (3G GSM is also actually a type of CDMA. I'll explain that later.)

So why did so many U.S. carriers go with CDMA? Timing. When Verizon's predecessors and Sprint switched from analog to digital in 1995 and 1996, CDMA was the newest, hottest, fastest technology. It offered more capacity, better call quality and more potential than the GSM of the day. GSM caught up, but by then those carriers' paths were set.

It's possible to switch from CDMA to GSM. Two carriers in Canada have done it, to get access to the wider variety of off-the-shelf GSM phones. But Verizon and Sprint are big enough that they can get custom phones built for them, so they don't see the need to waste money switching 3G technologies when they could be building out their 4G networks.

The Technology Behind CDMA vs. GSM

CDMA and GSM are both multiple access technologies. They're ways for people to cram multiple phone calls or Internet connections into one radio channel.

GSM came first. It's a "time division" system. Calls take turns. Your voice is transformed into digital data, which is given a channel and a time slot, so three calls on one channel look like this: 123123123123. On the other end, the receiver listens only to the assigned time slot and pieces the call back together.

The pulsing of the time division signal created the notorious "GSM buzz," a buzzing sound whenever you put a GSM phone near a speaker. That's mostly gone now, because 3G GSM (as I explain later) isn't a time division technology.

CDMA required a bit more processing power. It's a "code division" system. Every call's data is encoded with a unique key, then the calls are all transmitted at once; if you have calls 1, 2, and 3 in a channel, the channel would just say 66666666. The receivers each have the unique key to "divide" the combined signal into its individual calls.

Code division turned out to be a more powerful and flexible technology, so "3G GSM" is actually a CDMA technology, called WCDMA (wideband CDMA) or UMTS (Universal Mobile Telephone System). WCDMA requires wider channels than older CDMA systems, as the name implies, but it has more data capacity.

Since its inception, GSM has had many more add-ons and evolutions than CDMA. As I mentioned above, WCDMA is considered the 3G version of GSM technology. To further speed things up, the 3GPP (the GSM governing body) released extensions called HSPA, which have sped GSM networks up to as fast as 42Mbps, at least in theory.

Our CDMA networks, meanwhile, are stuck at 3.6Mbps. While faster CDMA technologies exist, U.S. carriers chose not to install them and have instead turned to 4G LTE to be more compatible with global standards.

The Future is LTE

The CDMA vs. GSM gap will close eventually as everyone moves to 4G LTE, but that doesn't mean everyone's phones will be compatible. LTE, or "Long Term Evolution," is the new globally accepted 4G wireless standard. All of the U.S. carriers are turning it on.

The problem is, they're turning it on in different frequency bands, with different 3G backup systems, and even, in Clearwire's case, using an LTE variant (TD-LTE) that doesn't work with any other U.S. carrier's phones.

Furthermore, it's not like the 2G and 3G networks are going away any time soon. Carriers have told us they're leaving their UMTS and EVDO networks live until at least 2020. So we will not enter a European-style paradise of interchangeable phones anytime soon.

So what does all of this mean for you? If you want to switch phones often, use your phone in other countries, or use imported phones, go with GSM. Otherwise, pick your carrier based on coverage and call quality in your area.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2407896,00.asp

  #142  
Old 01-12-2013, 04:08 AM
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Originally Posted by GeneArch View Post
Let's use the iPhone as an example

iCloud advantages:
Free
Instant sync of pictures between devices, as well as backed up to your web connected PC or Mac, for FREE
Shared photostreams with friends
Encrypted Cloud Backup of device
Lose device, pictures are saved

Old School Sync
Plug phone into PC or Mac, Sync, then do the same with the next device.

You can have it your way, but to me it makes no sense. I had a friend spend a week in Maui, attended her sisters wedding, took tons of pics... phone was lost on the last day. She realized she had iCloud enabled, her precious memories were safe. A hardwired sync would have required she take along a laptop or she would have simply been out of luck.

Same goes for Android and Picasa or Google Plus and Dropbox
When it is an option it is great but when people do not have the option or lose the option then it is not great. I have a MBP,iPad 3 and an iPhone 5. I prefer to sync my iPhone 5 and iPad 3 with my MBP and not the server personally. In the past I could sync my Notes on my iPad and iPhone with my MBP but now that option vanished as I can only sync them via the iCloud server.

Before you know it we won't need any Memory,HDD or flash memory on any of our Smartphones,tablets or Computers as everything goes directly straight to the cloud server In order to retrieve any information we would need to access the cloud server to retrieve it.

For those that want this option as a backup option I think it is fine and acceptable but but only as an option not a mandatory thing with no option for the end user.
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  #143  
Old 01-12-2013, 11:01 PM
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BlackBerry 10

"Rogers and Bell have both sold more pre-orders than their initial order for #BB10 so they had to increase orders quantities.

@Bell_Mobility yep, they are using the portal to judge demand, and it is thru the roof!

One carrier informed us that pre-order interest already passed 250,000 for #bb10. That's one carrier and BB10 isn't launched yet.

As of right now at least 800,000 BB10 pre-orders total."

http://twitter.com/BlackberryScoop


Last edited by MCSL; 01-12-2013 at 11:08 PM.
  #144  
Old 01-13-2013, 02:10 AM
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BlackBerry 10

"Rogers and Bell have both sold more pre-orders than their initial order for #BB10 so they had to increase orders quantities.

@Bell_Mobility yep, they are using the portal to judge demand, and it is thru the roof!

One carrier informed us that pre-order interest already passed 250,000 for #bb10. That's one carrier and BB10 isn't launched yet.

As of right now at least 800,000 BB10 pre-orders total."

http://twitter.com/BlackberryScoop

So far this may explain the recent stock surge on RIMM. I am thinking if things go well we see $20. On Friday we saw some great gains

PS: You don't see to have much to say except for copy/paste of article links
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  #145  
Old 01-13-2013, 11:57 PM
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BlackBerry 10

RIM gave Forbes a demo of the phone’s software at CES 2013, unveiling some impressive features and factoids.

1) First a crucial factoid: carriers apparently like it.
So far 150 of them from around the world are testing BlackBerry 10 in their labs, according to CMO Frank Boulben, which means they’ll almost certainly carry the phone. He expects 200 carriers to offer BB10 by the summer of 2013.

2) The phone is launching with more than 70,000 available apps, along with new features to BlackBerry Messenger that RIM will disclose at launch.

3) The phone takes away a physical “home” buttons — a bit like Nokia’s Lumia phones. It relies on lots of swiping gestures and shortcuts for one-handed use by on-the-go business types.

4) The mobile platform, based software by QNX, allows users to have two personas on the device – one for work and one for private life, with separate background images and a password that can stop kids from accidentally calling someone’s boss. Users can swap between the two with a single gesture, and decide what content is deemed personal and accessible, or private and professional on the same device.

5) A new feature called BlackBerry Hub.
This is a neat amalgamation of all notifications that users access by swiping in an “L” shape, up and to the left. When writing an email and a new one comes in, users can also swipe slightly to “peek” at the content, before continuing with their email. No need to press a button or delete any draft of the email.

6) BlackBerry Hub’s integration with Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and LinkedIn — with potential for other developers to allow their apps to integrate with the Hub too. Users don’t have to go into any of these applications to update their profiles or comment on these networks, but do it all in the Hub.

7) Quick context and aggregation.
BlackBerry has created an apparently seamless system that allows you to get relevant information on people in your calendar. Swipe down to see the next appointment, then tap to see previous meetings you’ve had with the person, or what they last said to you in an email, or what a Google search on them brings up, or their LinkedIn profile — all within a couple of windows and without opening a browser. “It follows your train of thought,” says Boulben, who described this experience as “BlackBerry Flow.”

8) A keyboard that learns.
This applies to the touch-screen version of BlackBerry 10, since RIM is bringing out a second BB 10 device with a physical keyboard. The application scans every email or instant message you’ve sent and builds an algorithm to better predict what words you’ll type — rumor has it RIM partnered with A.I. startup SwiftKey on this. Predicted words hover on the “frets” between the key rows, and you select them by flicking up with your thumb (see video below). Swipe down on the keyboard to get punctuation symbols; swipe backwards across the keyboard to erase a word. If you tend to type between the O and P, the keyboard will learn this and shift the touch actuator to lie between the two keys.

9) Language.
Start typing the word “je” and the BlackBerry 10 keyboard automatically suggests French words. “There is nothing more frustrating than writing in one language and being corrected in another,” says Boulben, who is French.

10.) A few other things we don’t know about. Boulben said RIM would unveil a couple of extra features at its Jan. 30 announcement, and the handset he showed me was not the finished product.

Overall, RIM is eagerly promoting BlackBerry 10 — it’s not keeping the details about it under wraps like Apple. In fact, Boulben has been in 32 countries in the last four months to promote the hell out of this phone. And for good reason.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyols...blackberry-10/

  #146  
Old 01-14-2013, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by MCSL View Post
BlackBerry 10

RIM gave Forbes a demo of the phone’s software at CES 2013, unveiling some impressive features and factoids.

1) First a crucial factoid: carriers apparently like it.
So far 150 of them from around the world are testing BlackBerry 10 in their labs, according to CMO Frank Boulben, which means they’ll almost certainly carry the phone. He expects 200 carriers to offer BB10 by the summer of 2013.

2) The phone is launching with more than 70,000 available apps, along with new features to BlackBerry Messenger that RIM will disclose at launch.

3) The phone takes away a physical “home” buttons — a bit like Nokia’s Lumia phones. It relies on lots of swiping gestures and shortcuts for one-handed use by on-the-go business types.

4) The mobile platform, based software by QNX, allows users to have two personas on the device – one for work and one for private life, with separate background images and a password that can stop kids from accidentally calling someone’s boss. Users can swap between the two with a single gesture, and decide what content is deemed personal and accessible, or private and professional on the same device.

5) A new feature called BlackBerry Hub.
This is a neat amalgamation of all notifications that users access by swiping in an “L” shape, up and to the left. When writing an email and a new one comes in, users can also swipe slightly to “peek” at the content, before continuing with their email. No need to press a button or delete any draft of the email.

6) BlackBerry Hub’s integration with Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and LinkedIn — with potential for other developers to allow their apps to integrate with the Hub too. Users don’t have to go into any of these applications to update their profiles or comment on these networks, but do it all in the Hub.

7) Quick context and aggregation.
BlackBerry has created an apparently seamless system that allows you to get relevant information on people in your calendar. Swipe down to see the next appointment, then tap to see previous meetings you’ve had with the person, or what they last said to you in an email, or what a Google search on them brings up, or their LinkedIn profile — all within a couple of windows and without opening a browser. “It follows your train of thought,” says Boulben, who described this experience as “BlackBerry Flow.”

8) A keyboard that learns.
This applies to the touch-screen version of BlackBerry 10, since RIM is bringing out a second BB 10 device with a physical keyboard. The application scans every email or instant message you’ve sent and builds an algorithm to better predict what words you’ll type — rumor has it RIM partnered with A.I. startup SwiftKey on this. Predicted words hover on the “frets” between the key rows, and you select them by flicking up with your thumb (see video below). Swipe down on the keyboard to get punctuation symbols; swipe backwards across the keyboard to erase a word. If you tend to type between the O and P, the keyboard will learn this and shift the touch actuator to lie between the two keys.

9) Language.
Start typing the word “je” and the BlackBerry 10 keyboard automatically suggests French words. “There is nothing more frustrating than writing in one language and being corrected in another,” says Boulben, who is French.

10.) A few other things we don’t know about. Boulben said RIM would unveil a couple of extra features at its Jan. 30 announcement, and the handset he showed me was not the finished product.

Overall, RIM is eagerly promoting BlackBerry 10 — it’s not keeping the details about it under wraps like Apple. In fact, Boulben has been in 32 countries in the last four months to promote the hell out of this phone. And for good reason.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyols...blackberry-10/

I read the camera was still awful. Lots of lag and not very good camera hardware. Nowadays you have to have a very good camera.
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  #147  
Old 01-14-2013, 04:20 PM
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dtkw dtkw is offline
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Now looks like the new Sony SE Xperia Z is sweeter.
  #148  
Old 01-15-2013, 12:18 AM
MCSL MCSL is offline
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For average consumers, '3G' and '4G' are two of the most mysterious terms in the mobile technology dictionary, but they're used relentlessly to sell phones and tablets. If you're shopping for a new phone, the answer isn't clear-cut, and you shouldn't always go for the higher number. Our primer will help explain which technology to pick.

3G vs. 4G: What Are They?

First things first, the "G" stands for a generation of mobile technology, installed in phones and on cellular networks. Each "G" generally requires you to get a new phone, and for networks to make expensive upgrades. The first two were analog cell phones (1G) and digital phones (2G). Then it got complicated.

Third-generation mobile networks, or 3G, came to the U.S. in 2003. With minimum consistent Internet speeds of 144Kbps, they were supposed to bring "mobile broadband." There are now so many varieties of 3G, though, that a "3G" connection can get you Internet speeds anywhere from 400Kbps to more than ten times that.

New generations usually bring new base technologies, more network capacity for more data per user, and the potential for better voice quality, too.

4G phones are supposed to be even faster, but that's not always the case. There are so many technologies called "4G," and so many ways to implement them, that the term is almost meaningless. The International Telecommunications Union, a standards body, tried to issue requirements to call a network 4G but they were ignored by carriers, and eventually the ITU backed down. 4G technologies include HSPA+ 21/42, WiMAX, and LTE (although some consider LTE the only true 4G of that bunch, and some people say none of them are fast enough to qualify.)

There's one rule to follow: Each generation will offer faster Internet speeds than the last, that is, on the same carrier. Sprint's WiMAX 4G is almost always faster than its CDMA 3G. But AT&T's 3G HSPA can be faster than MetroPCS's 4G LTE. You can rely on speeds to move up within your carrier, though.

This confusion is why we run our annual Fastest Mobile Networks story, which tests 3G and 4G networks in 20 cities nationwide. In last year's tests, we generally found that Verizon's 4G LTE network was the fastest, followed by T-Mobile 4G HSPA+, AT&T 4G HSPA+, Sprint 4G WiMAX, MetroPCS 4G LTE, Verizon 3G, and Cricket 3G, with Sprint 3G pulling up the rear. As AT&T and Sprint roll out new LTE networks, we expect them to be competitive with Verizon's LTE speeds.

When to Go For 4G

The mobile carriers are still building out their 4G networks, so first, you need 4G coverage to appreciate a 4G phone. Of the national carriers, Verizon and T-Mobile have the broadest 4G coverage. AT&T currently covers about a quarter of the U.S. population.

Sprint is in the middle of switching 4G systems, from WiMAX to LTE. The two are incompatible, so you must check coverage in your city for the specific variety of 4G you're buying.

If you like to surf the Web and especially stream video, 4G can be heaven. If you connect a laptop to your mobile link, 4G makes a huge difference. In general, anything involving transferring large amounts of data gets a big boost from 4G. Watch out for the data limits on your service plan, though; it's easy to use up a lot of data very quickly with 4G.

If you have a 3G phone and you've been frustrated with clogged-up networks, 4G may be the solution. You'll be switching to a different, less-trafficked network for your Internet data. 4G won't solve any dropped call problems, though, as all calls will be made over 3G networks until carriers switch to voice-over-LTE during the next few years.

Finally, if you want to future-proof yourself, get a 4G phone. 4G coverage is only going to get better, and that's where the carriers are spending most of their money right now. As we move into 2013 and 2014, some carriers will even try to switch subscribers to 4G-only phones, which make voice calls over the LTE network.

When to Buy 3G

If you live in an area that doesn't have 4G coverage, there's no advantage to a 4G phone. In fact, you'll have serious battery life problems if you buy an LTE phone and don't disable 4G LTE, as the radio's search for a non-existent signal will drain your battery quickly.

In general, if you value battery life more than Internet speeds, there's still life in 3G yet. We've seen significantly shorter usage times on 4G devices than on 3G devices, most notably on Verizon and Sprint phones. (Our LTE explainer goes into detail as to why that's the case, and why T-Mobile's HSPA+ 42 is currently the least battery-hogging form of 4G.) We'll see that situation improve over the next two years as integrated 3G/4G chips arrive, and then as carriers switch to 4G for voice calling. Of course, you can also buy a 4G phone and turn the option off using a menu option or downloaded app.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2399984,00.asp

http://www.att.com/network/

http://t-mobile-coverage.t-mobile.com/

http://network4g.verizonwireless.com/

http://www.sprint.com/landings/lte/index.html



  #149  
Old 01-15-2013, 05:30 PM
dymockpoet dymockpoet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stylinexpat View Post
I really like a some of these new concepts

http://www.ubergizmo.com/2012/10/the...on-board-with/
That looks amazing!
  #150  
Old 01-16-2013, 12:37 AM
MCSL MCSL is offline
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LTE is not just the next generation of wireless technology. LTE is an ongoing, living standard. LTE is a standard that will continuously improve over time. Many expect LTE to be the standard for cellular networks for at least the next decade, possibly even beyond!

LTE stands for Long Term Evolution. Its full name is 3GPP Long Term Evolution for the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System, or 3GPP UMTS LTE for short. Most refer to the standard as UMTS LTE or just plain LTE.

LTE is what the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (the group responsible for standardizing and improving the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System, or UMTS) designates as their next step. UMTS is the group of standards that define 3G for GSM networks across the world, including AT&T and T-Mobile's 3G networks. For those who use CDMA2000 (subscribers of Verizon, Sprint, etc.), then LTE is pretty much the replacement for 3G network. LTE is a very good, easily deployable network technology, offering high speeds and low latencies over long distances.

LTE can support up to 200 active data clients (smartphones, tablets, USB modems, mobile hotspots, etc.) at full speed for every 5MHz of spectrum allocated per cell.

The network architecture for LTE is greatly simplified from its predecessors because LTE is a packet-switched network only. It doesn't have the capability to handle voice calls and text messages natively (which are typically handled by circuit-switched networks like GSM and CDMA).

LTE uses two different types of air interfaces (radio links), one for downlink (from tower to device), and one for uplink (from device to tower). By using different types of interfaces for the downlink and uplink, LTE utilizes the optimal way to do wireless connections both ways, which makes a better optimized network and better battery life on LTE devices.

The reason why LTE devices right now eat batteries for breakfast is because some network operators are forcing these devices into active dual-mode operation. C Spire Wireless, MetroPCS, Cricket Wireless, and U.S. Cellular will all have the same problem as Verizon Wireless with LTE battery life because they all plan to do the same thing as Verizon Wireless and force active dual-mode operation.

The ultimate goal of the network operators deploying LTE is to replace everything else they have with it. That means that it needs to become possible to handle voice calls, text messages, network alerts, etc. over the data network. However, no one developed the LTE specification with voice and text messaging in mind. It was designed as a data network only. So how do they solve the problem? By developing a VoIP solution that fits their needs.

LTE represents a paradigm shift from hybrid voice and data networks to data-only networks.

http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/110711-what-is-lte




Last edited by MCSL; 01-17-2013 at 12:21 AM.
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