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E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)
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  #1  
Old 04-22-2013, 06:15 PM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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2 Run Flats and 2 Non-Runflats

I went to get my summers (run flats) installed back on to the car. Apparently, the two rear ones are busted and i need new tires.

I want to switch to non-runflats for the summer season as well but a little low on case. is it okay if i put on 2 new summer non runflats on the rear and keep the current run flats in the front till next summer?

Also, i am running on two winters (rear) and two summers (front) right now. Any immediate disadvantage to this?

Thanks in advance
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  #2  
Old 04-22-2013, 06:40 PM
alpinweiss alpinweiss is offline
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I think the handling of your car would be scary and unpredictable, in an emergency situation. A team of highly skilled German engineers has tried to give your BMW superior handling characteristics. I would not want to second-guess them by mixing tires.

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  #3  
Old 04-22-2013, 06:58 PM
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CALWATERBOY CALWATERBOY is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shasayed View Post
I went to get my summers (run flats) installed back on to the car. Apparently, the two rear ones are busted and i need new tires.

I want to switch to non-runflats for the summer season as well but a little low on case. is it okay if i put on 2 new summer non runflats on the rear and keep the current run flats in the front till next summer?

Also, i am running on two winters (rear) and two summers (front) right now. Any immediate disadvantage to this?

You would be a test case watched by all. Also, any collision might be blamed on same by an alert adjuster.

Ya'll OK with that?
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  #4  
Old 04-22-2013, 07:41 PM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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Getting 4 summers ASAP! lol
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  #5  
Old 04-22-2013, 08:37 PM
Nickh Nickh is offline
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What's winter?

Is that when it goes below 60 degrees?
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  #6  
Old 04-22-2013, 08:44 PM
Romanianbimmer Romanianbimmer is offline
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I am actually curious about this question. But if the tires are all season. My rears will be non runflats and front will be runflats will I have any problems?
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  #7  
Old 04-23-2013, 04:25 AM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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Nickh, winter (here in canada) are pretty much extreme cold weather condition tires with snow driving tread.

Romanianbimmer, if you find the answer anywhere, help out here.
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  #8  
Old 04-23-2013, 09:12 AM
Tom K. Tom K. is offline
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Originally Posted by Romanianbimmer View Post
I am actually curious about this question. But if the tires are all season. My rears will be non runflats and front will be runflats will I have any problems?
Not unless you drive over 35, or on wet pavement, or twisty roads, or use the brakes, or have an emergency situation come up...

Different tread and/or construction characteristics will likely result in a different response to steering and braking inputs - possibly resulting in an unplanned off-road excursion.

Tom
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  #9  
Old 04-23-2013, 10:18 AM
Franky 4 Finger Franky 4 Finger is offline
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2 Run Flats and 2 Non-Runflats

Not recommended as far as all allayment gurus would say. Not safe for you (passengers) and for your car!


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  #10  
Old 04-23-2013, 10:29 AM
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need4speed need4speed is offline
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As noted above, the two types of tires aredifferent animals. It would be very dangerous to mix them and attempt to drive in a normal manner. N4S
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  #11  
Old 04-23-2013, 04:32 PM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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god help me

i am currently on two non run flats (rear and snow tires) and two run flats (front and all season) because i had no other option yesterday at the tire change over shop .

New tires should be in stock for day after tomorrow. Hope i am ok till then. gonna try and drive real safe.
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  #12  
Old 04-23-2013, 06:51 PM
fb88 fb88 is offline
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This is probably no less dangerous than unaligned tire/wheel that have uneven wear. We've all read that this is undesirable but has any testing been done by Tirerack, Edmunds, MythBuster?
Driving on a donut, excess tire pressure or low pressure would be worse than mixing same set of tires front and back.
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  #13  
Old 04-23-2013, 07:02 PM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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so far i havent noticed a huge drivin/braking difference. Will update if anything changes on that or when it rains (hopefully not).
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  #14  
Old 04-23-2013, 07:16 PM
Romanianbimmer Romanianbimmer is offline
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Thank you!
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  #15  
Old 04-24-2013, 01:58 AM
Robin128 Robin128 is offline
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Do you remeber the good old days when 'we' mixed cross-plies and radials?

Remoulds anyone??

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  #16  
Old 04-24-2013, 07:50 AM
Tom K. Tom K. is offline
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[QUOTE=Robin128;7540118]Do you remeber the good old days when 'we' mixed cross-plies and radials?
[QUOTE]

Yes. A lot of unsuspecting folks got into accidents mixing bias plies and radials.

Tom
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  #17  
Old 04-24-2013, 10:21 AM
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pointandgo pointandgo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom k. View Post
not unless you drive over 35, or on wet pavement, or twisty roads, or use the brakes, or have an emergency situation come up...

Different tread and/or construction characteristics will likely result in a different response to steering and braking inputs - possibly resulting in an unplanned off-road excursion.

Tom
+1

http://www.michelinman.com/mediabin/...h_Bulletin.pdf

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=52

http://www.feldmanshepherd.com/123-r...e-Mounting.php
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Last edited by pointandgo; 04-24-2013 at 11:52 AM.
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  #18  
Old 04-24-2013, 10:25 AM
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Iron_KK Iron_KK is offline
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2 Run Flats and 2 Non-Runflats

Quote:
Originally Posted by shasayed View Post
I went to get my summers (run flats) installed back on to the car. Apparently, the two rear ones are busted and i need new tires.

I want to switch to non-runflats for the summer season as well but a little low on case. is it okay if i put on 2 new summer non runflats on the rear and keep the current run flats in the front till next summer?

Also, i am running on two winters (rear) and two summers (front) right now. Any immediate disadvantage to this?

Thanks in advance
That's exactly what I have now and everything is fine. I changed my rears to non run flats last year and still have run flats up front. They are now worn out so I will be replacing the run flats in the front with non run flats next month


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  #19  
Old 04-24-2013, 05:48 PM
shasayed shasayed is offline
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for the past couple days ive driven like this (non-run flat in the rear and run flat in the front), i haven't noticed anything extremely "off" even in a little bit of rain driving.

However, I still don't recommend it as an emergency situation may be what brings out the true disadvantage of this.
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  #20  
Old 04-24-2013, 06:09 PM
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pointandgo pointandgo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shasayed View Post
for the past couple days ive driven like this (non-run flat in the rear and run flat in the front), i haven't noticed anything extremely "off" even in a little bit of rain driving.

However, I still don't recommend it as an emergency situation may be what brings out the true disadvantage of this.
See Pg 3.

The Rubber Manufacturers Assn. represents every major tire manufacturer in the world and they don't recommend mixing RFs and non-RFs. Of course you can ignore this advice...the plaintiffs' bar is always ready to help.

http://www.rma.org/tire_care_info/ti...at%20tires.pdf
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  #21  
Old 04-24-2013, 06:52 PM
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ProfessorCook ProfessorCook is online now
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I admit that the vast majority of the world thinks I'm wrong, but I like being honest.

From a physics point of view, I have never found any rational argument about having different tires on the front than on the rear, providing all tires are in good shape and are the same type... e.g. winter/all season/summer

Counter argument? Different handling/braking characteristics in the front and back can lead to unpredictable behavior, particularly in an emergency situation.

I agree this sounds quite logical... but here's my point... the front wheels are always in a very different situation than the rears. They turn and the rears don't. During acceleration, they have less down force. During braking they have more. We could get into the weeds about what characteristics you'd rather have on the front than on the rear, and in the end, we'd be choosing different tread patterns and compounds for the front vs. the rear.

My stock E92 came with a staggered setup and plenty of other cars and manufacturers come with staggered setups too. Thus, there are different handling/braking characteristics between front and rear coming straight from the manufacturer.

So... again... from a physics point of view, having different front and rears is not a big deal.

Now... from a legal standpoint... I agree with PointandGo... an astute insurance adjuster or lawyer might have a field day should you end up in an accident because you could be accused of willfully ignoring manufacturer's recommendations. (Let's just ignore the potential conflict of interest when the tire manufacturers recommend four new tires as opposed to two.)
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  #22  
Old 04-24-2013, 07:17 PM
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pointandgo pointandgo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorCook View Post
I admit that the vast majority of the world thinks I'm wrong, but I like being honest.

From a physics point of view, I have never found any rational argument about having different tires on the front than on the rear, providing all tires are in good shape and are the same type... e.g. winter/all season/summer

Counter argument? Different handling/braking characteristics in the front and back can lead to unpredictable behavior, particularly in an emergency situation.

I agree this sounds quite logical... but here's my point... the front wheels are always in a very different situation than the rears. They turn and the rears don't. During acceleration, they have less down force. During braking they have more. We could get into the weeds about what characteristics you'd rather have on the front than on the rear, and in the end, we'd be choosing different tread patterns and compounds for the front vs. the rear.

My stock E92 came with a staggered setup and plenty of other cars and manufacturers come with staggered setups too. Thus, there are different handling/braking characteristics between front and rear coming straight from the manufacturer.

So... again... from a physics point of view, having different front and rears is not a big deal.

Now... from a legal standpoint... I agree with PointandGo... an astute insurance adjuster or lawyer might have a field day should you end up in an accident because you could be accused of willfully ignoring manufacturer's recommendations. (Let's just ignore the potential conflict of interest when the tire manufacturers recommend four new tires as opposed to two.)
GOOD to see you back, Professor! You were missed.

My perspective in this is deeper than I've admitted to, both from a technical and litigation standpoint.

The simple fact is that tires with deeper tread depth (newer) will hydroplane later, and at a higher speed than 'worn' tires. This becomes a critical issue during cornering when a tire is expected to give us 'grip' during the cornering maneuver. If the rear tires (more worn) give us 'less' grip than the front tires (higher tread depth), we'll experience a rather sudden "oversteer" condition in wet conditions.

This is simply due to the tire's ability to evacuate water from under its contact patch. Tires with more 'tread depth' can do this better than worn tires.

This will be more dramatic depending on the "standing water" on a roadway as the rear tires hydroplane before the front tires.

Michelin Tire has issued advisories warning that a differential of 2/32nd" between the front and rear tires is the max. allowable...in other words, the FRONT tires should not be that much deeper than the rear tires. This is based on testing.

Higher tread depth tires on the front is very dangerous in wet driving. Many fatalities have resulted from this in the past few decades. Regretfully, I am aware of a few of them through my participation in litigation.

Regardless of "opinions" on this issue, major tire installers such as Costco, Wal Mart, Tire Rack, Les Schwab, Big O, Discount Tire...WILL NOT, OR DO NOT recommend installing two new tires on the front of a vehicle. They will refuse.

Not merely out of fear of litigation, but because they UNDERSTAND the reason behind it.
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E90 328i
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E39 528i 5MT
MBz W140 S320
MBz W124 300E (slammed)
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'67 Pontiac Firebird 'cabrio' (1st car - "the leaker")
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