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E46 (1999 - 2006)
The fourth generation 3 Series (E46 chassis) was introduced in 1999 and set the standard for engineering and performance during it's years of production including being named to Car & Driver's 10 best list every one of those years! ! -- View the E46 Wiki

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Old 05-25-2013, 05:01 AM
DJ Vitamin Zee DJ Vitamin Zee is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2013
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Mein Auto: 2005 330i 6mt
2005 330i Audio Upgrade DIY With Photos, Amp/Sub/Speakers

There are several E46 audio upgrade DIYs floating around, but it took me a bit of time to track down all the information I needed for my install. So, I figured I would accumulate everything in one thread and document my process, in case it can help others. Many, many thanks to those who provided the info in the various links below. Without their time and effort, I would still be using my stock system.

My car:
  • 2005 330i 6mt
  • HK sound
  • CD changer
  • No nav
My audio components:
  • a/d/s p640 amp (bridgeable 6x40w)
  • a/d/s 635is component speakers
  • JL Audio 10W0 sub in enclosure
Let me say up front that I have no experience with the BSW upgrades so I cannot comment on how they sound. However, if you are looking for the best bang-for-your-buck audio upgrade in terms of cost, ease of install, and sound improvement, I would probably recommend the following:
  • keep the OEM head unit
  • keep the OEM amp to power the rear OEM speakers for fill
  • get an aftermarket amp to power front component speakers and a subwoofer
  • get a subwoofer in an enclosure for the trunk
  • get a pair of component speakers for the front door and mount the woofers in the door
A good amp, sub, and pair of speakers can be had for a reasonable price and the difference will be significant.

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BACKGROUND
--------

I used to be more of an audiophile. I had systems professionally installed in my '93 Celica convertible and my '99 4-Runner. The 4-Runner install included the a/d/s amp and speakers, along with a Nakamichi head unit and JL Stealthbox. Here is a photo of the custom baffle that was built to house the woofer of the 635is in the front door of the 4-Runner:



The amp was bridged to 3 x 120w, powering the a/d/s speakers and the subwoofer. The head unit amp was used to drive the rear speakers (a pair of Infinitis) for fill. It was a sweet-sounding system for all types of music.

When I traded in the 4-Runner for another Celica in '03, I removed the system and re-installed it in the Celica myself, adding an aux input line. I reused the circular pieces from the 4-Runner baffles to create baffles for the Celica. Here is what one of those looked like:



Since the Stealthbox was made specifically for the 4-Runner, I sold it with the car and (re)bought the same 10W0 subwoofer in an enclosure to put in the Celica hatch. The system sounded nearly as good as it did in the 4-Runner. Ten years later the Celica was still going strong with 225k miles, but it was time for a change so last month I got my 330i. It's my first BMW, though my wife has driven them for 20 years (first an '87 325i, then a 2000 528i wagon, now a 2010 328i wagon).

My first thought was that I would just make do with the HK system. It was relatively easy to take the Celica apart and wire things where they needed to go, but I had much less confidence dealing with a BMW. I like trying to do things myself, but I'm not an electronics expert and didn't want to mess up my new ride. I figured it would take a lot of time and/or money to get my components installed properly. Plus, I'm not as picky about audio quality as I used to be, partly because I listen to more talk radio and podcasts nowadays.

Still, it's a great set of components and I would miss them, so I decided to do a little research. The parameters of the install, if it was going to happen, were as follows:
  • Use the OEM head unit (wanted a stock look, plus my Nakamichi head unit is on its last legs and I didn't want to buy new stuff)
  • Use my existing components (like I said, didn't want to buy new stuff)
  • Do it relatively cheaply (if I take it to an installer) or without taking too much time (if I do it myself)
Though the devil is in the details, the meat of the install really boils down to three parts:
  • connecting the amp to the OEM wiring
  • mounting the amp and other components in a secure location
  • mounting the speakers in the front doors
One of the most useful posts I found with respect to E46 audio system wiring can be found here:

http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=245914

It is a re-post of a previous Roadfly post that seems to have vanished, and contains a bunch of information, a DIY install guide, and many additional helpful links. The install was done on an M3 coupe with no CD changer so it did not exactly match my situation, but the wiring is basically identical. Also, the install used the same p640 amp and the 5.5" version of the same speakers (535is) which was nice.

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ACCESSING THE OEM AMP AND WIRING
--------

The OEM amp and all the relevant wiring you need to tap into are in the trunk on the driver's side, behind the trunk liner. The shape and size of the liner will be different depending on whether or not you have the CD changer, but the process of removing it is the same. This link has photos and instructions related to removing the trunk liner:

http://m3.madrussian.net/diy_alpine.shtml

Basically, you want to do the following:
  • Pull out the tail light assembly by releasing the tab next to the interior light. You can leave it dangling for now. You just need room to get the liner off.
  • Lower the rear seat on the driver's side.
  • Use a flat screwdriver to remove the plastic retainers holding the liner in place. First pop out the center of the retainer, then pop out the larger base section. The link above only references two retainers, but I had a third one inside the passenger cabin where the liner wraps behind the rear seats. I had to push the seat leather out of the way a little to access it.
  • Slowly pull the liner out of the vehicle, starting at the tail light and working your way forward. Be careful as you near the back seat. There is a piece of plastic at the top of the trunk holding the liner in place, and it seems fragile. See the above link for a picture. Carefully maneuver the liner around the plastic so it doesn't break. The liner should now be free.
  • Re-install the tail light assembly for now. You will have to remove it again to put the liner back, but that probably won't happen for a while.
Here is the trunk with the liner removed:



The OEM amp is mounted behind the changer on the same set of brackets. After removing the bolts for the changer (and the tray below it), slide it out and disconnect the wiring. Then you will see the amp:



If you do not have a changer, the OEM amp will be out in the open mounted to a smaller bracket. Also, notice in the top right of the picture you can see a bolt connected to the car frame used to ground several of the factory wires. I used this same bolt to ground my aftermarket equipment.

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UNDERSTANDING THE OEM WIRING
--------

Once you have access to the OEM amp, you will see a big connector with lots of wires:



These wires include:
  • power
  • ground
  • remote turn-on
  • 4 outputs from the head unit coming into the amp (FL, FR, RL, RR)
  • outputs from the amp going to all the speakers
The OEM amp has built-in crossovers that split the signal before sending it to the various speaker components. Naturally, the front speakers receive the signal from the front head unit outputs, and the rear speakers receive the signal from the rear head unit outputs.

How you tap into these various wires depends on the nature of your install, but the most important thing to know if you plan to add an aftermarket amp is that the outputs from the OEM head unit have a balanced differential signal. This is different from the low-level RCA inputs accepted by most amps. Some newer amps apparently accept balanced differential inputs, but my a/d/s amp does not. In this case, you need a line output converter (LOC) in order to route the output from the OEM head unit into your aftermarket amp. The LOC that kept coming up in multiple threads was the SVEN by Peripheral. There is a SVEN2 (2-channel) and a SVEN4 (4-channel):



The big question for me was what to do about the rear speakers. As I mentioned, my a/d/s amp was running in 3x120w bridged mode. In this mode there are no channels to power rear speakers. My options were:
  • Don't use any rear speakers. Since I would like rear passengers to have enough sound, I didn't consider this option very long.
  • Run the a/d/s amp in 5-channel mode and give 40w to the a/d/s speakers and 40w to the rear speakers. An interesting option, but not what I wanted to do for a couple reasons: (a) I know how well my speakers sound when they get 120w of power and didn't want to sacrifice front speaker sound quality, (b) the OEM rear speakers are two-way components so I would either have to add a crossover between the amp and the speakers, or send the entire signal only to the woofers which are not meant to carry high-frequencies.
  • Keep the OEM amp in the system to power the rear speakers. This would allow me to maintain the current configuration of my components, and was therefore clearly the best option for me. The only question was whether there would be enough space in the trunk for both the OEM amp and my aftermarket amp.
So, my plan for tapping into the existing wiring was as follows:
  • three-way splice into the remote turn-on, allowing it to still operate the OEM amp in addition to the a/d/s amp
  • disconnect the head unit's front outputs going into the OEM amp and re-route them (via the SVEN) into the a/d/s amp
  • disconnect the outputs to the front speakers from the OEM amp and connect them to the outputs of the a/d/s amp
  • leave the head unit's rear outputs connected to the OEM amp for powering the rear speakers
Even though this solution only calls for a SVEN2 (2-channel), I decided to spend the extra $10 to get a SVEN4. That way if I ever decide to do something with the rear head unit outputs, I have a solution. I bought the SVEN4 off eBay for about $30. It was advertised as new, but was clearly used when I received it. It worked just fine though, so I gave the vendor a bad rating and moved on.

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DECIDING WHERE TO MOUNT THE AMP
--------

With the liner and changer removed, I could tell that my amp would have just enough room to fit in the space vacated by the changer, while still allowing the OEM amp to remain in place. Since I didn't care about the CD changer, it seemed like a perfect solution. The only issue was that the brackets were in the way, so I would have to get rid of them while also finding a way to keep the OEM amp secure. Here is a photo of what I did:



This allowed the OEM amp to remain securely mounted, gave space to mount the new amp, and provided a part of the changer bracket to help mount the new amp.

I mounted the amp to a piece of wood that was cut a few inches longer than the amp itself. This was so that when I mounted the amp vertically, the wood could rest against the trunk floor for stability, while the amp remains a few inches off the trunk floor to give room for the connectors. Then I left the amp sitting flat on the trunk floor to do the wiring.

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TAPPING INTO THE OEM WIRING
--------

To disconnect the wiring from the OEM amp, you have to push the tab down on the swing arm holding the connector in place, then fold the swing arm down and out of the way, so you can pull the connector out. Upon closer inspection, you will see that it is actually two separate connectors housed in a single piece. Use a small flathead screwdriver to release the tabs allowing you to slide the connectors out.

The pin numbers are marked on the connectors which helps a lot. Here is a list of each pin and what it is connected to:

Grey half of connector

Pin #1 / Woofer Rear Left -Brown
Pin #2 / Woofer Rear Left +Yellow
Pin #3 / Woofer Front Left -Blue / brown
Pin #4 / Woofer Front Left +Blue / white
Pin #5 / +12v factory amp +12v supply Red / green
Pin #6 / no connection Pin
Pin #7 / no connection
Pin #8 / Head unit output Rear Right + Blue / black
Pin #9 / Head unit output Front Right + Blue / red
Pin #10 / Switched +12v remote turn on White
Pin #11 / Tweeter Front Right + Blue / black
Pin #12 / Tweeter Front Right - Blue / Brown
Pin #13 / Tweeter Rear Right door + Yellow
Pin #14 / no connection
Pin #15 / no connection
Pin #16 / Head unit output Rear Right - Brown / orange
Pin #17 / Head unit output Front Right - Brown / orange
Pin #18 / no connection
Pin #19 / no connection
Pin #20 / no connection
Pin #21 / Tweeter Rear Right door - Blue / yellow

Black half of connector

Pin #22 / Woofer Front Right -Blue / Brown
Pin #23 / Woofer Front Right +Blue / Red
Pin #24 / Woofer Rear Right -Brown
Pin #25 / Woofer Rear Right +Blue
Pin #26 / DC ground factory amp Brown
Pin #27 / no connection
Pin #28 / no connection
Pin #29 / Head output Rear Left - Brown / orange
Pin #30 / Head output Front left - Brown / orange
Pin #31 / Tweeter Rear Left door + Yellow / black
Pin #32 / Tweeter Rear left door - Yellow / brown
Pin #33 / Tweeter Front Left + Yellow / red
Pin #34 / Tweeter Front Left - Yellow / brown
Pin #35 / no connection
Pin #36 / no connection
Pin #37 / Head output Rear Left + Yellow / black
Pin #38 / Head output Front Left + Yellow / red
Pin #39 / Mid Front left door - Blue / white
Pin #40 / Mid Front left door + White
Pin #41 / Mid Front Right door - Blue / green
Pin #42 / Mid Front Right door + Green

I can only personally confirm the pins I used for this install, though I found multiple posts that matched the above list.

For my install, these were the steps needed to tap into the OEM wiring:
  • Cut the white remote turn on wire (grey connector, pin 10), then reconnect the two pieces along with a new third wire running to the remote turn on of the a/d/s amp
  • Cut the yellow/red FL+ head unit output (black connector, pin 38) and connect it to the FL+ input on the SVEN.
  • Cut the brown/orange FL- head unit output (black connector, pin 30) and connect it to the FL- input on the SVEN.
  • Cut the blue/red FR+ head unit output (grey connector, pin 9) and connect it to the FR+ input on the SVEN.
  • Cut the brown/orange FR- head unit output (grey connector, pin 17) and connect it to the FR- input on the SVEN.
  • Cut the FL+ woofer output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the low-pass + output of the left a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FL- woofer output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the low-pass - output of the left a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FL+ tweeter output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the high-pass + output of the left a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FL- tweeter output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the high-pass - output of the left a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FR+ woofer output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the low-pass + output of the right a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FR- woofer output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the low-pass - output of the right a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FR+ tweeter output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the high-pass + output of right left a/d/s crossover
  • Cut the FR- tweeter output ( connector, pin ) and connect it to the high-pass - output of the right a/d/s crossover
I first made the connections by just twisting wires together and using a little electrical tape, in order to test the system and make sure I was connecting everything properly before permanently crimping wires. (I recommend crimping for the cleanest, most secure connection.) I also didn't care if the wires were tangled at this point, as I would clean up all the wiring before permanently mounting the amp.

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FINISHING THE CONNECTIONS
--------

After connecting everything properly (hopefully) to the OEM wiring, there were just a few connections left to finish up:

• ground the SVEN and a/d/s amp
It's a simple matter to connect the ground wires from the SVEN and the aftermarket amp to the bolt (mentioned earlier) already used for grounding. The SVEN has a ground wire on both the input and output sides. However it was my understanding that only the ground wire on the output (RCA) side needed to be grounded. So I started with that, but was prepared to tinker with the ground once I got the system running if there was too much noise. Make sure the ground wire from the amp is the proper gauge and try to make the run as short as possible.
• connect the FL/FR RCA outputs of the SVEN to the inputs on the a/d/s amp
Use a good-quality RCA cable for this. Again, simple enough.
• connect the amp to power
The fact that the battery is in the trunk makes this much easier. Make sure you install a proper inline fuse as close to the battery as possible. I reused the same cable/fuse from my previous installations:



Then I routed the cable up under the liner (then down through the spare tire area and back up to the other side):


It might be a good idea to disconnect the negative side of the battery before messing around with car wiring, but I didn't bother and everything was fine. YMMV.

Here is a photo of all the preliminary connections completed:



--------
TESTING THE SYSTEM
--------

Fired everything up and…no sound! WTF? Turns out I had connected the wrong outputs from the SVEN to the amp. I used the "FL/FR" inputs on the (bottom) left side of the unit, but for some reason those were feeding the RCA outputs on the (top) right. Whatever. After swapping the connections everything worked! At this point, the a/d/s amp was powering the stock HK front woofer and tweeter. I was actually quite impressed with how good it sounded, considering that the stock speakers are 3-way components so the woofer and tweeter were receiving signals meant for the stock mid-range.

The main issue I noticed at this time was that the sub was being muffled in the trunk and I could not hear it properly in the cabin. This is apparently a common issue on the E46. The first thing I did was remove the stock 6x9s in the trunk, which I was planning to do anyway since they were no longer needed. I thought this might give more of an airway from the trunk into the cabin, but it did not really improve the sound. Thankfully, my 330 came with the ski pass-through, which can be easily removed with just a few screws. This immediately fixed the issue and the sub came through loud and clear into the cabin. Awesome. The only downside is that when you lower the rear middle armrest, there is a hole right into the trunk now:



I will find a way to make that look better when I have some time. You can see the leather flap on the back of the armrest that used to attach to the ski pass-through with Velcro, I will likely use some new Velcro to attach this to the remaining frame in some way. Not urgent.

If you do not have the ski pass through, you can still remove the metal plate behind the rear middle passenger seat, but it may involve a hammer. A Google search will find several DIYs on the matter.

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MOUNTING THE CROSSOVERS, SVEN, AND AMP
--------

My mounting solutions were pretty makeshift, but they did the job fine. I basically took all the various pieces of metal I had laying around my garage, and fashioned a few brackets for mounting the components securely. I even used a couple pieces from the cut CD changer bracket to do the job.

First, I created a small bracket and used Velcro to mount the a/d/s crossovers in the space above the OEM amp. Then I used a small L-bracket and bent it to about 120 degrees to mount the SVEN to one of the mounting holes previously used for the changer bracket. Here is what those looked like:



For the amp, I fashioned one bracket that attached to the piece of the changer bracket I had left for that purpose, and another bracket that attached to the same hole that I used to mount the SVEN. Then I mounted both brackets to the piece of wood holding the amp in place.

Here is what it all looked like when done:



Once everything was in place, there was no apparent engine noise or other audio interference getting into the sound system. Though I had not tuned the gain on the SVEN or amp yet, it sounded quite clean. I was excited. Now for the speakers.

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REMOVING THE FRONT DOOR PANELS
--------

I was surprised to find that the stock woofers were not mounted into the door itself, but just into the door panel. A woofer needs an adequate enclosure (preferably sealed as much as possible) to provide good mid-bass output. So when I saw this thread on installing speakers directly into the E46 doors, for me there was no question that this was what I wanted to do:

http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=317339

Besides, while the door panels take 6 1/2" woofers, the stock speakers are very shallow. Many aftermarket 6 1/2" speakers (including my a/d/s) are too deep to fit without cutting a hole in the door anyway. So I had no other choice if I wanted to use my speakers. If you want to go the easy way and just panel-mount your new speakers, make sure to get some that are shallow enough to fit.

Anyway, first you have to remove the door panel. The install document on BSW's website for their E46 stage-1 speaker upgrade has directions:

http://www.bavariansoundwerks.com/pr..._E46_Sedan.pdf

There are also several YouTube videos that show how to remove the door panel, if you prefer. The procedure is pretty simple, actually. There are five torx screws to remove: Two under the upper trim, two under the plastic tabs on the bottom side of the armrest, and one in the upper armrest inside the mirror control area. You can use a flathead screwdriver to remove everything needed to access the screws. On the driver's side, disconnect the mirror control assembly as well after prying it out to access the screw.

Once the screws are out, you have to pop out all the plastic snaps holding the door panel to the door. Start in the lower rear, inserting a flathead screwdriver and slowly prying the panel away from the door. Work your way up from the bottom. Once all the snaps have been popped, hold the door panel by the arm rest and jiggle it loose from the top of the door. Disconnect the door handle and the speaker connections, and the panel is free.

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MOUNTING THE TWEETERS
--------

Unfortunately, I forgot to take photos of the tweeter replacement, but it was straightforward. The BSW install pdf I mentioned above has instructions with photos for accessing the tweeters. There are two plastic clips on the inside of the door that hold the plastic housing covering the tweeter in place. Remove these clips with a flat tool, then grab the edge of the housing where the clips were and pull outward until the panel releases and exposes the tweeter. Do not remove the housing any more than is necessary to access the tweeter. Then do all your work and push the housing back into place, replacing the clips.

The OEM tweeter is mounted to the two torx screws that hold the mirror in place. Remove the top screw, then loosen the bottom screw just enough to slide the tweeter out. Do not remove the bottom screw all the way. Cut the wires to the OEM tweeter and connect them to the aftermarket one.

How you mount the tweeter depends on its size. You can fashion something to use the two available screws, but there is also a foam insert with a hole inside the housing and you may be able to tightly wedge the tweeter into the hole without any screws needed. That's what worked for me since the a/d/s tweeters were bigger than the stock ones.

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MOUNTING THE WOOFERS
--------

Looking at the inside of the door panel, you can see that the woofer location is surrounded by three snaps, all equal distance from the speaker:



This was helpful in figuring out where to cut into the door, as I could use the three holes in the door as a reference. Taking the baffle, I placed it in the correct spot and traced the inside on the door. After drilling a hole (make sure your window is up at this point), I started with some tin snips but that grew tiresome very quickly, so I got a metal cutting blade and switched to my hand-held jigsaw. That went much better:



Once the hole was complete, I lowered the window and realized it would get in the way if I mounted the speaker too deep into the door. And of course if the speaker stuck out from the door too far then the panel would not fit back on. So I would have to be careful about the thickness of the baffles. I did a rough estimate of the distance from the door panel to the rolled-down window by taking two measurements: (1) from the window to the door frame, and (2) from the snaps on the door panel (that attach to the door frame when installed) to the woofer grill. I estimated around 3" of space. My speakers have a depth of 2.5". So I had about half an inch to play with. Not much.

Also, as you can see from the picture above, the door frame is not flat where the baffle needs to be mounted, so I spent some time cutting, filing, and sanding the baffle here and there to fit more snuggly against the door. It did not have to be anywhere near perfect since I was going to seal the area between the baffle and the door with Dynamat anyway, but I wanted at least a reasonable amount of snugness.

Thankfully, once I had the baffle shaped to fit better against the door, it was just about the right depth I needed for the speaker to fit between the door panel and the window. To give a little more leeway, without wanting to recess the speaker further into the door and risk hitting the window, I took a Dremmel with a cut-off wheel and shaved off a thin slice of the woofer grill on the inside of the panel:



This gave just a little more breathing room between the speaker and the door panel. I mounted the baffle to the door using two long screws. Then I cut the OEM connector off the speaker wires, ran them inside the door (by poking a hole in the vapor barrier) then out through the baffle. I connected the wires to the woofer and mounted the woofer to the baffle. Then I went around the baffle and sealed it to the door using strips of Dynamat. I left a little space around the holes for the plastic snaps to make sure they could still re-engage when I put the door panel back on:



The panel went back on without problems and the speaker sounded great.

Unfortunately, things didn't go quite as smoothly for the driver's side woofer. The reason? The wiring inside the door hangs down lower than on the passenger's side, just barely into the space behind where I needed to cut my hole. Of course, I didn't realize this until my jigsaw had already done some damage, slicing into a couple of the wires. So I had to carefully crimp the wires back together:



When I finished, my mirrors did not work. It took me some time to realize that there is a 5A fuse for the mirrors that was blown when I sliced through the wires. I borrowed the fuse from the horn (also 5A) and the mirrors started working again. Phew! Cost me a couple hours of time, but it could have been worse, and it was my own fault.

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TUNING THE SYSTEM
--------

With the install complete, I was really happy with the mid-bass response I was getting from the front speakers. They sounded even better than they did in my Celica, I'm guessing because the BMW door is more solid and sealed. This allowed me to turn the low-pass crossover frequency on my sub down even lower, giving a sharp crisp sound to the entire low-end of the system.

To tune the system properly, I wanted the signal from the head unit to be as strong as possible without distortion. It turned out to be pretty easy because when I left the gain on the SVEN at max, I was able to adjust the gain on the amp until I reached maximum listening volume at about 80% of the head unit's max level, without distortion. When I tried turning the gain on my amp down and increasing the head unit volume, I started to get some distortion. Turning the gain on the SVEN down did not seem to eliminate the distortion when the head unit was near max volume levels. So I just went back to the original setting with the SVEN gain on max and the amp gain set to reach max volume at about 80% of the head unit's max level.

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FINAL THOUGHTS
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Well, that's about it. I've had the system installed and tuned properly for a couple weeks now and am so happy I invested the time and effort to do the install. So far the only downside is that at higher volume levels there are a couple low frequencies that give some light rattles from the trunk area. I have not had time to determine where they are coming from yet, but I still have some Dynamat left so I will attack the issue when I get a chance.

Hope you found this post useful, interesting, or both. Next project? My short-shift kit. Then perhaps a Parrot hands-free Bluetooth system.

-- Z
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  #2  
Old 05-25-2013, 11:23 AM
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SJBimmer SJBimmer is offline
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That is an awesome post! There should definitely be a link in the wiki to this post. Thanks for taking the time to write this up!
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Old 05-25-2013, 11:41 AM
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ahull ahull is online now
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Originally Posted by SJBimmer View Post
That is an awesome post! There should definitely be a link in the wiki to this post. Thanks for taking the time to write this up!
Good idea. Wiki already has extensive discussion, so I added a section at the end called Upgrade Threads that starts off with this thread.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/wiki/index...pgrade_Threads
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Old 05-25-2013, 12:18 PM
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SJBimmer SJBimmer is offline
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Good idea. Wiki already has extensive discussion, so I added a section at the end called Upgrade Threads that starts off with this thread.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/wiki/index...pgrade_Threads
Thanks ahull! Did not know you had the power of the Jedi.... err Wiki !
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:38 PM
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Mein Auto: ist schnell! (03 330i SC)
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Originally Posted by SJBimmer View Post
Thanks ahull! Did not know you had the power of the Jedi.... err Wiki !
Actually, I think anyone over a certain number of posts can edit it, like a true wikipedia. There is some syntax involved in getting the right formatting (to be consistent), but it's pretty intuitive.
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2003 330i TiAg Sport Pkg ~90k miles
DIY MODS: AA Stage I supercharger, Meyle HD FCAs w Powerflex CABs, Bilstein shocks, Meyle HD Rtabs, Angel Eyes, Clear Corners/Markers w/ LEDs, LED tails, ZHP rims, Akebono pads, AUX input
DIY E46 Merit Badges: Sunroof resurrection, CCV, OFHG, VCG w/ VANOS seals, DISA, Cooling Refresh I, steering giubo, window regs, Magnetic Infandibulator (see wiki)
DIY On deck: Rear Diff bushing. UUC SSK, clutch job eventually, Wavetrac LSD
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  #6  
Old 05-25-2013, 06:29 PM
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SJBimmer SJBimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahull View Post
Actually, I think anyone over a certain number of posts can edit it, like a true wikipedia. There is some syntax involved in getting the right formatting (to be consistent), but it's pretty intuitive.
I did not know that. (best Johnny Carson voice) LOL Hope you are having a good holiday weekend!
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Old 05-26-2013, 07:09 AM
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Mein Auto: ist schnell! (03 330i SC)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJBimmer View Post
I did not know that. (best Johnny Carson voice) LOL Hope you are having a good holiday weekend!
And you!
__________________
2003 330i TiAg Sport Pkg ~90k miles
DIY MODS: AA Stage I supercharger, Meyle HD FCAs w Powerflex CABs, Bilstein shocks, Meyle HD Rtabs, Angel Eyes, Clear Corners/Markers w/ LEDs, LED tails, ZHP rims, Akebono pads, AUX input
DIY E46 Merit Badges: Sunroof resurrection, CCV, OFHG, VCG w/ VANOS seals, DISA, Cooling Refresh I, steering giubo, window regs, Magnetic Infandibulator (see wiki)
DIY On deck: Rear Diff bushing. UUC SSK, clutch job eventually, Wavetrac LSD
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  #8  
Old 03-04-2014, 10:21 AM
alexbnk alexbnk is offline
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Mein Auto: 1998 318i
Great post


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