Welcome to Bimmerfest -- The #1 Online Community for BMW related information! Please enjoy the discussion forums below and share your experiences with the 200,000 current, new and past BMW owners. The forums are broken out by car model and into other special interest sections such as BMW European Delivery and a special forum to voice your questions to the many BMW dealers on the site to assist our members!

Please follow the links below to help get you started!

Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > X Series > X3 F25 (2011 - current)

X3 F25 (2011 - current)
The latest X3 brings some added style and some new features to the BMW SUV family. Talk about the new F25 now!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #76  
Old 02-11-2014, 10:28 AM
farg farg is offline
Registered User
Location: Oregon
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 89
Mein Auto: 2014 X3 3.5i
How about we discuss a simple topic....like abortion or someting? People seem just about as diametrically opposed on the RFT issue. You are either yea or nay. Little gray area it would seem, and just as difficult to convince some one with the alternate position.

Interesting discussion tho.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 02-11-2014, 10:58 AM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
There is nothing to discuss. Unsprung weight and rotating mass are critically important to vehicle dynamics. 10 lbs per wheel is a huge difference.

If they are the technology of tomorrow, why aren't they on every car today? Because adding 10 lbs per wheel of weight is a chassis engineers nightmare.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 02-11-2014, 11:34 AM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
If they are the technology of tomorrow, why aren't they on every car today?

They are coming Todd!
From MSN:
A New Age Coming
According to experts, all road-going production vehicles will eventually come standard with run-flat-type tires. The rules on mandatory tire pressure monitors for all 2004 model year vehicles, brought about by the TREAD Act, will trigger substantial growth in run-flat tire installation at the factory. Such a development meshes perfectly with manufacturers' intention to eliminate the spare wheel and all related paraphernalia from their vehicles.

As OEM installation rates increase dramatically, so will the availability or fully-adapted replacement units. The cost of which should follow the reverse trend.

All this is excellent news for all of us, drivers and passengers alike. A new driving safety paradigm is coming soon, thanks to emerging and interconnected tire technologies. It's a thankless job, being round and black, but tires will indeed keep the world turning for a long time still.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 02-11-2014, 12:24 PM
bmw23x3 bmw23x3 is offline
Registered User
Location: California
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 31
Mein Auto: 2013 x3 28i space gray
so far I'm satisfied with my Pirelli RFT

Last edited by bmw23x3; 02-11-2014 at 12:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 02-11-2014, 12:40 PM
Z4golfer's Avatar
Z4golfer Z4golfer is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: California
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 334
Mein Auto: 2011 Z4 35is
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw23x3 View Post
so far I'm satisfied with my Pirelli RFT
Me too.
__________________


2011 Z4 35is
2014 X3 28i
Reply With Quote
  #81  
Old 02-11-2014, 01:22 PM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL345 View Post
If they are the technology of tomorrow, why aren't they on every car today?

They are coming Todd!
From MSN:
A New Age Coming
According to experts, all road-going production vehicles will eventually come standard with run-flat-type tires. The rules on mandatory tire pressure monitors for all 2004 model year vehicles, brought about by the TREAD Act, will trigger substantial growth in run-flat tire installation at the factory. Such a development meshes perfectly with manufacturers' intention to eliminate the spare wheel and all related paraphernalia from their vehicles.

As OEM installation rates increase dramatically, so will the availability or fully-adapted replacement units. The cost of which should follow the reverse trend.

All this is excellent news for all of us, drivers and passengers alike. A new driving safety paradigm is coming soon, thanks to emerging and interconnected tire technologies. It's a thankless job, being round and black, but tires will indeed keep the world turning for a long time still.
Wow, so the entirety of your automotive knowledge is from an MSN Auto editorial from 2004. Here is the entire story you quoted:

MSN Incorrectly Predicts Run Flats To Become Standard 2004

As long as we are relying on MSN as the oracle of automotive wisdom, how about a more recent editorial?

MSN Run Flats Suck 2010

You are so clueless it's laughable.
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 02-11-2014, 03:01 PM
flavius99 flavius99 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NH
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 161
Mein Auto: 2014 X3 28i
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z4golfer View Post
Me too.
I haven't had a chance to drive them them in the summer yet, but so far they are quite ok in the winter.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 02-11-2014, 03:44 PM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
Quote:
Originally Posted by todd92 View Post
Wow, so the entirety of your automotive knowledge is from an MSN Auto editorial from 2004. Here is the entire story you quoted:

MSN Incorrectly Predicts Run Flats To Become Standard 2004

As long as we are relying on MSN as the oracle of automotive wisdom, how about a more recent editorial?

MSN Run Flats Suck 2010

You are so clueless it's laughable.
Well first you change the headlines for both links. You mis state the link I posted which deals with the mandatory TPMS that will enable manufacturers to install RFT's. It doesn't predict these tires will be standard by 2004.

Your link is not anything new. It is more news about consumer resistance. It also ends:
But Cowger is not giving up on run-flat tires at GM. He said the tire industry expects to cut weight and rolling resistance in three to four years.

HERE'S SOME NEWS FROM EDMUNDS FROM JANUARY 2013:
Run-Flat Tires
Vehicles equipped with run-flat tires have no spare at all. Run-flats can either automatically seal a puncture or have reinforced sidewalls that allow them to operate with little to no tire pressure.

Once a run-flat tire has been punctured and lost its air pressure, the vehicle's tire-pressure monitoring system (TPMS) will notify you that the tires are below spec and the vehicle is in "run-flat mode." You will have to keep your speed under 50 mph, but you can still continue to drive (up to 50 miles) until you are able to find a tire shop or service station.

The advantage of run-flats is that "you don't have to stop your vehicle in an inopportune time or dangerous location, like the side of the freeway," Berger says.

Most run-flat tires can be repaired unless they are specifically marked otherwise. If a driver needs a replacement, run-flats are often more expensive than standard tires. Additionally, not every tire shop carries run-flat tires, which could be problematic for drivers outside of bigger cities.

Run-flats also have some performance trade-offs, Cowger says. Since run-flat tires have reinforced sidewalls, the tires are heavier and have a stiffer ride. They also have more rolling resistance, which can affect your fuel economy.

Over the past five years, use of run-flat tires has increased 81 percent, but they are standard on only 8.7 percent of new vehicles, according to Edmunds data. Traditionally, carmakers use run-flat tires on sports cars, but in recent years they have started to use them for other cars, too. BMW, whose luxury cars have sportier tendencies, has made run-flat tires standard on nearly every model. Even the newer, decidedly non-sporty Toyota Sienna minivan has a model that comes with run-flat tires.



NOTE THE LINE: "OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS, USE OF RUN FLAT TIRES HAS INCREASED 81%."
Your link talks about the class action suit by Honda mini van owners.
Typical--you don't understand that class action suit. It was based on the PAX system from Michelin. This is a very different RFT system and wasaccording to the NY Times:
"But that inner-ring design made the PAX more difficult to repair, requiring special equipment to mount and dismount the tire. That equipment is available primarily at Michelin or Honda dealers. In several lawsuits and on some Web sites, consumers have complained about the difficulty of finding shops with the equipment to work on PAX; they also cite excessive tire wear and replacement costs as high as $1,600 for four tires."

Todd
I won't say you are "clueless"--I will say you are not fuly versed on the subject and shouldn't have to change headlines to suit your argument.

I would love to know how and where you are driving your BMW to the point that you can notice subtle handling differences (I'd like to avoid the area) between RFT's (have you even driven on them? --and you "replacement conventional tires." What tires are you driving on anyway?

I also bet your donut or full size spare cost a pretty penny.

What are those advantages again?
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 02-12-2014, 04:26 AM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
It's about priorities. You are willing to drive your vehicle with diminished dynamics (that are anything but 'subtle' as you claim) every day, for the life of the vehicle, in exchange for a sense of security for an event that will likely never occur. What are the supposed advantages of RFT's again?

You are typical straw man debater, there is no point in engaging with you further. Enjoy!
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 02-12-2014, 06:13 AM
The X Men The X Men is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: MA
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 4,717
Mein Auto: 2012 535xi 2013 X3 35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by todd92 View Post
It's about priorities. You are willing to drive your vehicle with diminished dynamics (that are anything but 'subtle' as you claim) every day, for the life of the vehicle, in exchange for a sense of security for an event that will likely never occur. What are the supposed advantages of RFT's again?

You are typical straw man debater, there is no point in engaging with you further. Enjoy!
Most people do not drive their BMW to its full capability, adding a bit more acceleration or steering response by lower the unsprung weight is not going to make much difference to most people, unless you track your car, which is very unlikely with the X3. Keep in mind, the X3 is still a SUV, not a track car.
I am still on the fence when it comes to my next set of tires. Both conventional and runflat tires have their advantage and disadvantages. It really depends on what you want to use your car for. BMW knows that most owners of the X3 use it mostly as a commuter car that have some sport capacities. With that mind set, BMW design it with runflats for safety reason.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 02-12-2014, 06:40 AM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
Quote:
Originally Posted by The X Men View Post
Most people do not drive their BMW to its full capability, adding a bit more acceleration or steering response by lower the unsprung weight is not going to make much difference to most people, unless you track your car, which is very unlikely with the X3. Keep in mind, the X3 is still a SUV, not a track car.
I am still on the fence when it comes to my next set of tires. Both conventional and runflat tires have their advantage and disadvantages. It really depends on what you want to use your car for. BMW knows that most owners of the X3 use it mostly as a commuter car that have some sport capacities. With that mind set, BMW design it with runflats for safety reason.
Driving dynamics include ride quality, something that has nothing to do with pushing a car to its limits. You would think ride quality would then be of utmost importance to X3 owners, given the presumed driving duty.

BMW made the decision to equip all of their vehicles with RFT's, so I don't think the type of expected driving had anything to do with that decision. It's a marketing scheme, and apparently many have drunk the Kool-Aid.
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 02-12-2014, 07:22 AM
Masterx5 Masterx5 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: PA
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 212
Mein Auto: 2011 x3 3.5i
I am not sure why some people are fuming on this issue- take it easy - it is a discussion and some thoughts are well put here. Technology will evolve on the conventional tires and you will laugh at this post in next decade. So relax, put your thoughts and watch out for PAX, not from Honda this time, but from Mother Nature and be safe !!!
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 02-12-2014, 07:57 AM
The X Men The X Men is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: MA
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 4,717
Mein Auto: 2012 535xi 2013 X3 35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by todd92 View Post
Driving dynamics include ride quality, something that has nothing to do with pushing a car to its limits. You would think ride quality would then be of utmost importance to X3 owners, given the presumed driving duty.

BMW made the decision to equip all of their vehicles with RFT's, so I don't think the type of expected driving had anything to do with that decision. It's a marketing scheme, and apparently many have drunk the Kool-Aid.
I remember my first set of runflat on my 2008 Lexus GS350, the ride was simply horrible. Runflats have come a long way since then and I think BMW have simply done a very good job tuning the suspension for the runflats, the 18" runflats I have on my wife's X3 is hardly noticeable when it comes to ride comfort. I am still amazed at how smooth these Pirelli runflat rides. Sure conventional tires will make the X3 ride a bit softer, but the turn in will also be softer, there are trade offs for everything. I do think BMW should give the customer a choice as far as runflats or at least give us a optional spare tire like the new X5.
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 02-12-2014, 10:14 AM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
This is an interesting issue.
It is fraught with bad conventional wisdom and a lot of misunderstanding and mis information.

First--
psychologically
Cars originally came with a full size spare. People get flats and having another tire and rim sitting in your trunk was peace of mind.

When the industry moved to the donut and a temporary wheel it was the same thing--lots of complaints and fear of the new.

The introduction of Run Flats resulted in the same negative reaction--fear of the new. Also the original RFT's did have some legitimate problems--the Michelin PAX technology was obviously ill conceived. More "conventional" RFT's had some issues and have improved to the point that most of them are no longer "issues." Yet people still cling to them. The new(er) technology in tires--low resistance rolling etc is also being greeted with a lot of skepticism and the same complaints!

The issues in play are: RIDE, WEAR, HANDLING, COST
I would point out that all one has to do is read customer comments/reviews at a site like Tire Rack. No not the reviews for Run Flats. Read the reviews for conventional tires! These are NOT issues limited to Run Flat Tires!

Myths persist--
A big problem is many dealers and tire shops and mechanics are poorly informed. For example--most RFT's can be repaired. I had a Conti All Seasons repaired.

RIDE and HANDLING
A lot of this stuff is in "people's heads"--again--read the complaints about conventional tires. The worst tires I ever owned were high end Michelin performance tires--conventional design--on my Volvo Coupe they were awful--however, I have no doubt on the "right" vehicle they would have been fine!

People don't realize that tires are specially selected to fit the suspensions which are tuned to accommodate the tires. Though BMW has gone "all in" on RFT's other high end manufacturers are using RFT's on some surprising cars (see the Edmunds link). If RFT's were so poor then it is hard to explain why Chevy has them as OEM on the Corvette and most Cadillac's? Why on earth would engineers at Mercedes put RFT's on the 2014 S63 four-matic AMG sedan and select them for the 2014 S550? What about the legion of Infiniti models sporting RFT's?

BMW has come out and said changing from the OEM RFT's to a conventional tire could compromise the performance of the car's suspension--ride and handling! For some reason this is ignored.

Also rarely mentioned is the RFT's resistance to blow outs! Aside from safety issues in terms of waiting for help or changing a tire yourself, there's the serious, albeit rare blow out situation--especially at high speed.

Poor wear?
Again, if I can get almost 50K miles on a set of Conti all seasons RFT's????
I will admit that I haven't used high performance summer RFT's--though most MFGR's offer warranties, so this can be at best, a minor issue.

Are they perfect?
No.
I do think people should at least get good information before passing around poor conventional wisdom and perpetuating myths.

We are now a few generations of tech development of these tires. A lot of the myths are based on earlier iterations as well as initial problematic systems (Michelin's PAX).

Also Conventional or RFT, many tires are manufactured to the auto companies specifications. The same model tire can be "designed" for BMW (there will be a star on the sidewall) or another make--Mecedes has an "MO" on the sidewall. A lot of people do not know this.

Anyway--
Before I changed any OEM part (tires included), I would get some good information and proceed with some caution.




Edmunds--
http://cars.findthebest.com/d/x/Run-.-flat-Tires

Here's are recent Tire Rack tests. One high performance summer RFT's and the other All Season RFT's
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tests/...y.jsp?ttid=158
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tests/...y.jsp?ttid=164

http://www.tiretechnologyinternation...php?BlogID=980
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 02-12-2014, 10:18 AM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
The ride will be more compliant (softer as you say, but not really), however the turn-in will not be affected. The ride compliance will come from the reduction in unsprung weight and will have no effect on turn-in. The lower rotating mass will improve acceleration, braking and efficiency.
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 02-12-2014, 10:23 AM
todd92 todd92 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: NJ
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 611
Mein Auto: 13 X3 3.5, 05 ZHP
I have not mentioned WEAR or COST once, even though they do wear faster and cost 30-50% more.

The RIDE and HANDLING are not psychological, it's pure physics, easily quantifiable and it's very real.

All of your rubbish about matched suspension and going against OEM is just that, rubbish.
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 02-12-2014, 11:26 AM
The X Men The X Men is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: MA
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 4,717
Mein Auto: 2012 535xi 2013 X3 35i
A stiffer sidewall just like a shorter sidewall will always have an affect on turn in.
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 02-12-2014, 11:38 AM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
Quote:
Originally Posted by todd92 View Post
I have not mentioned WEAR or COST once, even though they do wear faster and cost 30-50% more.

The RIDE and HANDLING are not psychological, it's pure physics, easily quantifiable and it's very real.

All of your rubbish about matched suspension and going against OEM is just that, rubbish.
Costs are coming down.
A lot of the complaining IMOP-is based on the cost of the tires at dealers. Perusing discount tire chains and on line operations like Tire Rack, the cost of RFT's from top manufacturers are really not all that much more than conventional tires of equal quality. Also you never factor in the cost of a donut and spare etc.

The wear issue is also exaggerated. All tires from reputable manufacturers are warranted for wear.

For most drivers, I am afraid that ride and handling are at least part psychological.
Basically, your position is that BMW's (and by implication all or most other cars like the MB S63 AMG, most of the Cadillacs AND the 2014 Corvette and most Infiniti's) are compromised
in RIDE and HANDLING to the degree that the average driver feels compelled to go to the trouble of switching to conventional tires?

Firstly, the vast majority of the folks who buy those vehicles are NOT switching to conventional tires. Please explain the dramatic sales increases BMW or Cadillac have experienced. The problem is one of the squeaky wheels getting more attention than reality warrants!

As I recommended, read the consumer reviews on Tire Rack--for RFT's and Conventional tires. For most every tire RFT and Conventional you will get totally conflicting reviews. Same tire and one guy says they are horrible another will rave about them.

Also we are mostly talking in general terms here. If you replace OEM all seasons for High Performance summer tires (RFT OR conventional) one should expect better handling! (at least under dry summer conditions).

Are we talking a seven series or three or M? Sedan or convertible or an X..?

I would say that handling is a matter of perception--the worst handling car I ever drove was a Ferrari Testarosa (under 70 MPH the car handles like a 60's era Buick). How many drivers spin out on a damp road in their 911's until they learn to have a really light touch on the accelerator?!

My point here is, in everyday driving, the limits of most any car (even a Toyota Carolla) let alone its suspension and tires are rarely tested at even close to their limits. I know someone who is convinced Volvo's are too "stiff" and harsh" riding preferring her Pasat Wagon.


Read this and get back to me:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=22
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 02-16-2014, 03:56 AM
missedbass missedbass is online now
Registered User
Location: long island
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 81
Mein Auto: 2012 x3 28i
I have no issues with my RFT'S, miss the spare though. I may get a repair kit and compressor to put in the x3 for piece of mind. I have 17" rims so the sidewall is a bit higher than the larger rims. Don't know if that makes a difference with handling or not. I do think they may take a pot hole better than the low profile tires. The pot holes around here are causing a lot of damage and I'm curious which type of tires will hold up better RFT or CONV?
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 02-16-2014, 02:44 PM
ngrigoriev ngrigoriev is offline
Registered User
Location: Montreal
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 63
Mein Auto: X3 xDrive35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by missedbass View Post
I have no issues with my RFT'S, miss the spare though. I may get a repair kit and compressor to put in the x3 for piece of mind. I have 17" rims so the sidewall is a bit higher than the larger rims. Don't know if that makes a difference with handling or not. I do think they may take a pot hole better than the low profile tires. The pot holes around here are causing a lot of damage and I'm curious which type of tires will hold up better RFT or CONV?
I do not believe the potholes there are worse than the ones in Quebec...

Theoretically, the higher the sidewall, the softer the ride is. It should swallow the impact from the potholes and bumps better than low-profile tire. But, of course, at the expense of the tire integrity. Something has to absorb the damage. To me it is better the tire than the rim and suspension.

I use 17" rims for the winter with RFTs. So far cannot complain, the car drives very well on snow and ice - to my taste, of course. I think I am giving something up on handling and "sporty" ride. Which is fine with me, the winter is more about survival
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 02-18-2014, 04:29 PM
missedbass missedbass is online now
Registered User
Location: long island
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 81
Mein Auto: 2012 x3 28i
So driving on the belt pky today, saw about 20 cars on the side of the road all with flats. Mercedes and BMW's were the most popular on the side of the road (7 of each) followed by Audi, a Caddy, a Jeep and a small car. Don't know if they were RFT's or Conv. but most had spares they were putting on, the others had flatbeds. Glad I left the X3 at home. All were cars on the side of the road, no X3's. What does all this mean? No matter what tires you have and you can argue all day long, it's nice to have a spare!
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 02-18-2014, 05:12 PM
ngrigoriev ngrigoriev is offline
Registered User
Location: Montreal
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 63
Mein Auto: X3 xDrive35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by missedbass View Post
So driving on the belt pky today, saw about 20 cars on the side of the road all with flats.
Quick search for that story resulted in this: http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/02/...-belt-parkway/. Wow. Even with ****ty roads here I have not seen anything like it.

I guess regardless of having a spare or not, two flats usually means that you are stuck and in need of a tow truck
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 02-19-2014, 05:57 AM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
The weather has been really insane around here lately. Pot holes are always a problem--old roads and heavy traffic.
A lot of these pot holes were pretty deep and filled with water so drivers were deceived and hit them full speed.
Two critical factors in play are low profile tires (RFT's or conventional) and alloy rims.

I once hit a small but deep pothole going 55 plus and destroyed two rims--miraculously the tires still held air and my mechanic
rightly recommended replacing the tires AND the rims given the likely damage to the tires.

Alloy rims can not be repaired like the old steel versions--which could be hammered back into shape if dented.
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 02-19-2014, 06:11 AM
ngrigoriev ngrigoriev is offline
Registered User
Location: Montreal
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 63
Mein Auto: X3 xDrive35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL345 View Post
The weather has been really insane around here lately. Pot holes are always a problem--old roads and heavy traffic.
I remember a lady who has hit a large pothole somewhere here in Montreal 2 years ago. It was not only about the tires, I think the damage was more serious - the oil pan and whatever was around it. She sued the city for that. And she won.

http://www.canada.com/story_print.ht...f9bf9&sponsor=

I do believe that accidents happen sometimes but the city must be responsible for major negligence, like in that case. At the end, we pay them our taxes so they provide certain level of service...
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 02-19-2014, 06:32 AM
JohnL345 JohnL345 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: New York City
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Mein Auto: BMW 3 series soon
Quote:
Originally Posted by ngrigoriev View Post
I remember a lady who has hit a large pothole somewhere here in Montreal 2 years ago. It was not only about the tires, I think the damage was more serious - the oil pan and whatever was around it. She sued the city for that. And she won.

http://www.canada.com/story_print.ht...f9bf9&sponsor=

I do believe that accidents happen sometimes but the city must be responsible for major negligence, like in that case. At the end, we pay them our taxes so they provide certain level of service...
As I understand things, here no one can sue over potholes/damage unless they have notified the city/authorities in advance of any accident, of the pothole's existence.

Getting any redress from the local authorities is so difficult and costly few people even bother.

I still believe (my mechanic agrees) that RFT's provide a bit more protection via the stiffer sidewalls, than conventional tires. He even posits that there may be some cornering advantage as well.

That said, anything less than 50 series profile tires in this market is starting to play with fire and I would seriously consider tire and rim insurance. I got it for my last 328 which had 45 series tires but didn't this time--my latest 328 has 50 series.

I know the tires aren't "cheap" but it is the rims that can bankrupt you.
Contrary to some conventional wisdom, RFT's can be repaired from minor everyday occurrences like nails small punctures.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Forum Navigation
Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > X Series > X3 F25 (2011 - current)
Today's Posts Search
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
© 2001-2011 performanceIX, Inc. All Rights Reserved .: guidelines .:. privacy .:. terms