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E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)
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  #1  
Old 12-16-2013, 01:51 PM
Jenner292929 Jenner292929 is offline
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Letting your car warm up in the winter

How long do you suggest letting your car warm up for in the winter time?


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Old 12-16-2013, 01:55 PM
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Don't.

Get it running, wait for the various lights to go off, then drive gently until everything is warmed up, at least 15 minutes in very cold weather. The cooling system, the oil, the suspension, all warm up at different rates.
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Old 12-16-2013, 01:55 PM
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until it's warm...

I don't mean to be a smartass. I usually give it 3 through 5 minutes of running. Then lightly drive it and short shift it until it warms up
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Old 12-16-2013, 02:09 PM
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It is better to drive at low revs to warm it up rather than leave it standing/idling. The engine is designed to move a load. You want to get hot gases moving through the engine soon as possible to warm up the oil and minimize water build up - however, this is a balance with allowing the oil reaching its correct temperature to provide maximum lubrication. Idling is the best way to maximise condensation and the slowest way to warm up the oil. Ultimately, the water will get blown out the exhaust, but it will collect in the engine before being further evaporated and expelled at/close to the designed running temperature. The less time you have condensation in the engine, the better.
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Old 12-16-2013, 02:13 PM
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I usually get in (mind you garaged vehicle), start the car, put my phone away, get sun glasses, put the seat belt on, check behind me to make sure I'm clear, and then take off. About 30 seconds?

The manual states that no warm-up idling period is required or suggested, as indicated by others.
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Old 12-16-2013, 02:37 PM
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According to my local BMW dealer:

The purpose of warming up your car. The main reason drivers start their car and let it idle is to warm it up by getting the oil circulating through the engine. Modern fuel injection systems, however, with the elimination of carburetors and chokes, have made engine idling unnecessary. After about 30 seconds, the oil is circulating and your car is ready to go. The Hinkle Charitable Foundation's Anti-Idling Primer, in fact, asserts that idling forces the engine to operate in an extremely inefficient mode, which can harm the engine's performance and lower its mileage. If you're still skeptical, instead of idling, drive a little slower for the first mile or two.

Warming up the inside. Many commuters couldn't care less about engine efficiency at 6:00 a.m. in the morning when it's frigid cold. Instead, they just want a semi-warm vehicle to step into when it's cold. However, according to the California Energy Commission, idling your car isn't an effective way to warm up a vehicle. A more effective way to warm up your car is to actually drive it. If you really want to be on the cutting edge, electric cars allow you to pre-warm the vehicle via remote access without ever having to idle.

Idling and the environment. Still not convinced about the inefficiency of idling to warm up the vehicle? Perhaps you think engine inefficiency is a small price to pay for not freezing your fingertips when you enter your car. Maybe, a look at environmental effects will unfreeze your stance. Exhaust is harmful to human health, especially children. Certainly, exhaust is a necessary component of driving a car, but unnecessarily spewing exhaust adds to air pollution. Because idling often takes place close to curbs and sidewalks, pedestrians and children are especially at risk to the negative effects of exhaust.

The cost of idling. If air pollution and the potential harmful effects of unnecessary exhaust don't convince you to cut down on idling, perhaps the cost of gasoline will. Idling wastes gas. Gas costs money, therefore idling wastes money -- your money. Motorists are advised to turn off their engine when idling more than 10 seconds (traffic stops, excluded). You'll save money. You'll save the environment. You'll save your engine. A new engine, by the way, costs money too. A lot of money.

Proper car warming procedures. Don't stand by idly and let this information go to waste. If you're worried about your engine's performance, warm the car by driving it slowly. If you're worried about being cold when you hop in the car, bundle up, start the car, adjust the radio, turn on the heat and get going.

- See more at: http://www.nalleycollisioncenternews....xqkliFee.dpuf
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:17 PM
Al Bundy Al Bundy is online now
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Cold or not, I let my car idle until the RPMs drop to about 600...usually 30 seconds or so. When its cold, Ill shift gears pretty quick (2000-2500 RPMs) and keep the cruising RPMs low until I feel the car has warmed up.
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Old 12-16-2013, 04:43 PM
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30 seconds or so, then just drive moderately for the first 10-20km, keeping the revs low.
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Old 12-16-2013, 04:50 PM
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About 30 seconds, start car, clean snow off windows, and drive.
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Old 12-16-2013, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Bundy View Post
Cold or not, I let my car idle until the RPMs drop to about 600...usually 30 seconds or so. When its cold, Ill shift gears pretty quick (2000-2500 RPMs) and keep the cruising RPMs low until I feel the car has warmed up.
From my perspective, this.
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Old 12-16-2013, 06:49 PM
davinaii davinaii is offline
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Re: Letting your car warm up in the winter

I usually let it run at least 5 min, since I only drive 2 miles to work.
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Old 12-16-2013, 07:03 PM
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I read the manual and it said no warm up time. I usually start the car, let it run for about a minute and start moving. Don't rev to more than 2000rpm for the first 10 minutes of driving or until the needle starts moving. That's only if the car didn't run that day.
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Old 12-16-2013, 08:11 PM
ctorrey ctorrey is offline
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As Al Bundy mentioned, I let the car idle for a few moments until the RPMs come off the 1250 and settle in to ~650. This also accompanies the corresponding change in exhaust note as the flapper adjusts. Then I'm off.
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Old 12-17-2013, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by ///M-ratedE90 View Post
It is better to drive at low revs to warm it up rather than leave it standing/idling. The engine is designed to move a load. You want to get hot gases moving through the engine soon as possible to warm up the oil and minimize water build up - however, this is a balance with allowing the oil reaching its correct temperature to provide maximum lubrication. Idling is the best way to maximise condensation and the slowest way to warm up the oil. Ultimately, the water will get blown out the exhaust, but it will collect in the engine before being further evaporated and expelled at/close to the designed running temperature. The less time you have condensation in the engine, the better.
+1

As others have stated, run it about 30 seconds, use light throttle and keep the RPM's down until the engine coolant is in the normal operating area.
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Old 12-17-2013, 07:37 AM
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+1

As others have stated, run it about 30 seconds, use light throttle and keep the RPM's down until the engine coolant is in the normal operating area.
The coolant gets there in just a few minutes.

The oil, however, takes over 20 minutes to even get close to operating temperature during the winter in my car.
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:03 AM
hondo402000 hondo402000 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ///M-ratedE90 View Post
It is better to drive at low revs to warm it up rather than leave it standing/idling. The engine is designed to move a load. You want to get hot gases moving through the engine soon as possible to warm up the oil and minimize water build up - however, this is a balance with allowing the oil reaching its correct temperature to provide maximum lubrication. Idling is the best way to maximise condensation and the slowest way to warm up the oil. Ultimately, the water will get blown out the exhaust, but it will collect in the engine before being further evaporated and expelled at/close to the designed running temperature. The less time you have condensation in the engine, the better.
I think you are giving out miss information, you make is sound as if the oil pan is going to fill up with water if you let the car idle to warm up, This is definitely not the case. when the car cools down and siting cold and mainly during the spring when moist humid air condenses on cold surfaces is when there might be some condensation on the interior of the engine block, but its definitely not the norm... Over time if the car is drove for short distances and the oil doesnt reach maximum operating temperatures like over 212 degrees F, the boiling point of water, will the moisture will not evaporate out of the oil.

only way your oil can become saturated with water is if you blow a head gasket
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:15 AM
sunny5280 sunny5280 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenner292929 View Post
How long do you suggest letting your car warm up for in the winter time?
As long as you feel is necessary. During the below zero weather we had a couple of weeks ago I let my Subaru warm up for 20 - 25 minutes. That was enough to melt the ice on the windshield as well as have a warm car to get into.
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by hondo402000 View Post
I think you are giving out miss information, you make is sound as if the oil pan is going to fill up with water if you let the car idle to warm up, This is definitely not the case. when the car cools down and siting cold and mainly during the spring when moist humid air condenses on cold surfaces is when there might be some condensation on the interior of the engine block, but its definitely not the norm... Over time if the car is drove for short distances and the oil doesnt reach maximum operating temperatures like over 212 degrees F, the boiling point of water, will the moisture will not evaporate out of the oil.

only way your oil can become saturated with water is if you blow a head gasket
Can you do me the favour of reading my post?
Where did I say water collects in the oil? Where did I make it sound like water collects in the oil? I said the engine.

However, to be clear, the concern is not the condensate from that atmosphere from standing overnight, it is the pints of water generated during the combustion process - burning one gallon of gas produces ~7 pounds of water. I am hoping you have the cognitive ability to appreciate that the water content of the cold air contained within the volume of the engine block and exhaust system is less than 7 pounds

Plus, water does not need to be at 212degF to evaporate and be expellled from the engine. I am pretty sure the hot exhaust gases will help the evaporative process. I will clearly state that after it rains, the air temperature does not need to be at 212degF for the road to dry, and a breeze will speed up that process.

So, you make incorrect assertions about my post, argue against those incorrect assertions and then repeat what I stated in my post as a corrective statement.

What a mucking fuppet.

EDIT: BTW it is "misinformation". Not "miss information". "Miss Information" was a poorly conceived film starring Sandra Bullock in 2000
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:50 AM
nhman nhman is offline
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The coolant gets there in just a few minutes.

The oil, however, takes over 20 minutes to even get close to operating temperature during the winter in my car.
I agree and good catch (as I meant to say oil). My BMW does have an oil temp gauge which I use to determine when I can push the revs. However my non-BMW DD only has a coolant gauge. Once it reaches normal operating temperature, I'll wait 10 minutes before pushing the revs.
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Old 12-17-2013, 11:26 AM
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When the JB4 makes my blinkers double blink!!! Seriously though, the advice above is spot on, I'd wait for the idle to simmer down to 600 then go gently until oil hits the 160.....
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Old 12-17-2013, 11:31 AM
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The more I think about it, following nhman's lead, I think the best route forward is to buy an M3. It has a rotating "max revs" warning system on the tachometer that moves as the oil gets warmer. This way, there is no confusion.
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Old 12-17-2013, 12:15 PM
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The more I think about it, following nhman's lead, I think the best route forward is to buy an M3. It has a rotating "max revs" warning system on the tachometer that moves as the oil gets warmer. This way, there is no confusion.
What will those ///M-geneers come up with next!!! Brilliant.
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Old 12-17-2013, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ///M-ratedE90 View Post
The more I think about it, following nhman's lead, I think the best route forward is to buy an M3. It has a rotating "max revs" warning system on the tachometer that moves as the oil gets warmer. This way, there is no confusion.
It is a nice feature. Considering rod bearings get the last of the oil circulation, taking up to 10 seconds, I usually wait for the loud cold start routine to stop, keeping it light until my oil level registers.
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