Survey Discussion: Why Did You Buy A Diesel?

by Mark Jurista on October 2, 2013, 1:44 pm
Bimmerfest is partnering with The Diesel Driver on a number of surveys about cars. The first survey is about your experience buying a Diesel car. If you missed the announcement on the site, you can find the survey to fill out here:

Why Did You Buy A Diesel Survey

The primary purpose of this particular discussion is for you elaborate on your thoughts about what went into your buying decision when you purchased your car.

Results of this poll will be announced both online at the Diesel Driver and here on Bimmerfest.

So - what made you buy your diesel? Torque? Fuel Economy? Reliablity? Something Else? Please take the survey today and join in the discussion.


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50 responses to Survey Discussion: Why Did You Buy A Diesel?

CO_roadie commented:
October 2, 2013, 5:18 pm

There aren't many options out there with the functionality of 425 ftlb of torque that can confidently tow 6000 lb, have seating for 7 (albeit 2 kids), offer 25 mpg on the freeway with AWD, and handle superior to most cars on the road. It is a great family car and DD.
txagbmw commented:
October 2, 2013, 9:40 pm

One was fuel economy. But finding not as much as was expecting. Two reliability well we now know how that is turning out due to all the emission problems.
Nothing but problems for some. What was not listed, the eco credit. If that was not part of it, I would not have brought one. Just takes too long to recoup all that extra motor cost.
F32Fleet commented:
October 3, 2013, 7:33 am

Didn't want some piss poor hybrid??....err..
335dFan commented:
October 3, 2013, 8:21 am

I originally dipped my toes into the diesel pool in 1986 when I was thinking about taking a job that would have resulted in a much longer commute. So I bought a 1986 VW Jetta Diesel and kept it for 20 years and 300K miles. It was slow, noisy, smelly, smoky, and I loved it. And in the subsequent years I rented a lot of diesels when in Europe on vacation. So when I came back from Singapore in 2012 and was trying to decide on a car to buy, the 335d came to mind as I had become a diesel fuel devotee. As I had also owned a 2002 back in the '70s, the combo was a perfect match. It was either going to be an S4, a 335is, or a 335d. The 335d won out after driving all three (and a lot of other candidates).
jesus_man commented:
October 3, 2013, 9:47 am

Got an error, but it won't let me retry.

My first diesel was a 2002 F-350. Would have had one earlier if I could have afforded it. Next was a 2006 VW Jetta. From now on, I am going to try to have a diesel DD for both my wife and I when it makes sense. And I can't really think of many scenarios where it wont (short commute??). Anyway, the only box I didn't tic was the Lower Emissions. It wasn't any part of my decision, just a side benefit of being more efficient than it's counterparts. I try to convert my petrol friends on a daily basis.
d geek commented:
October 3, 2013, 10:18 am

Economy/reliability: After burning through several econo-boxes on a 120 mi daily commute, I decided to look into VW tdi back in 2001. My daughter still drives the car I bought that Sep and it has around 350k mi, gets around 45mpg.
Performance: espectially compared to the 4 cyl gassers, the low end grunt is impressive. Being able to release the clutch with your foot off the go pedal illustrates the big difference. The torque is available where you use it every day.

That was all with old technology. I know the new diesels have improved on both performance and economy, but I think the technology that enabled those improvements comes at the cost of reliability. I'm going to be buying a 328d in the next year or so, so I'll be able to judge this for myself first hand.
UncleJ commented:
October 3, 2013, 10:37 am

I have had 5 diesel cars and boats over the years starting with a 1960 180db that wouldn't do over 70 mph but I drove it across country 8 times with just one problem -- the crank shaft pulley came off in Rollo Mo. and I found it, the nut that held it, and fixed it in the parking lot of a church with the tool kit that came with the car! But I digress.....I agree the new ones have sacrificed reliability and I believe longevity for emissions. Not a bad trade off in this emissions concerned day and age, but I would not own one now without a full warranty.
piredon commented:
October 3, 2013, 1:20 pm

The practical:

For the X5: With Eco credit the lease payment was less than a comparably equipped gas model. It wasn't significantly slower than the gas model, and gets 25% better real world MPG. It also goes more than 500 miles between fill-ups.

The 535d (which I have not taken delivery of): No eco credit, but not significantly more expensive (less than 3%). Again, not appreciably slower than the gas variant, but much more efficient and much higher range. Also, a major feat of engineering to have an AWD, midsize luxury sedan that is as fast in a straight line as a Porsche Boxter, and as efficient as a Honda Civic.

The hard to quantify:

There is an aspect of rebelliousness to diesel ownership. There is something special about owning a diesel. Even if it's a make and model that's not very unique, the diesel variant typically feels like the special version. It's the variant that you are least likely to see out on the road, for the most part (Jetta wagons excluded). This is obviously not true in Europe, where fuel taxes have forced everyone to pay much greater attention to how much it actually costs to run their vehicles, but in this country, diesel passenger vehicle ownership is a pretty exclusive club.

And it's very subtle and understated, unlike some hybrids. Those who actually know cars will recognize you've got a diesel and probably think more of you, and those who don't know much about cars will have no idea it's a diesel.
Hamilton1974 commented:
October 5, 2013, 5:08 am

I wanted to upgrade to something more comfortable for my daily 125 mi commute from a 1998 Audi A4 1,9TDi. So I after lots of testdriving Audis, MBs and BMWs I finally found what I wanted in the BMW E65 7-series with the 40d 3.9L V8 diesel in which I get about 28mpg with 258hp and 442ftlb as well as great comfort. Been driving this one for three years and about 94k miles now and plan on keeping it for another 4-5 years until prices on the 750xd drops below 30000. 381hp, 550ftlb and getting 37mpg!
StealthBomber commented:
October 6, 2013, 11:42 am

Because a 530D is faster than a 535 Petrol. Oodles of torque, so it delivers that power in a very relaxed way. (Don't buy this car if you want one that sounds or feels fast, only if you want one that just IS fast)

And I can get 50mpg on a run. And I even average 40mpg. In a 535 petrol I would get 25mpg average if I was lucky.

I probably could not afford to run a petrol car, but in any case it was a positive choice to have the diesel anyway for that "oomph".
emPoWaH commented:
October 6, 2013, 12:47 pm

Main reason was cost-of-ownership:

1) Depreciation: The E350 BlueTEC had a slightly higher MSRP than the gas model, but its residual was 5% higher over a 24-month lease, so payments ended up being $100+ per month less.

2) Fuel: Here, diesel costs the same as premium, which the gas E350 requires anyway. Sometimes it's a few cents higher, sometimes it's the same as regular unleaded. So a wash. We've averaged 25 MPG in suburban driving over the past 7,000 miles, exactly its EPA combined rating. The EPA rating for the gas model is 23 MPG combined. At 800 miles per month, diesel saves us about $12/month.

3) Maintenance: We're doing a 24-month lease, so we only need to pay for one Service A midway. The BlueTECs require an AdBlue refill, which hopefully will not cost more than $100 extra. I'll shop around, but that's the wildcard.

Personally, I like the novelty of driving around in a diesel passenger car. I like the character, from the put-put-put sound at idle to the FedEx van noises it makes when accelerating gently. The enthusiast in me thinks it's cooler than the gas car, and surely people will find me more interesting to talk to at dinner parties as a result, though usually, when I get to the best part ("It's like a German taxi!"), they're so cross they've stopped listening. But that's only because they're jealous of the type of fuel combusted in my car's engine, which is odd because diesels are so unpretentious...

Oh, the torque is pretty nice as well. Driving a powerful diesel is so effortless.
jesus_man commented:
October 7, 2013, 3:46 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthBomber View Post
Oodles of torque, so it delivers that power in a very relaxed way. (Don't buy this car if you want one that sounds or feels fast, only if you want one that just IS fast)
Noticed this with our X5 as well. My '02 F-350 with some mods would snap your head back. The Q7 diesel I drove felt and sounded more powerful until I looked at the 0-60 times. I was amazed the X5 was faster than the Q7. And it handles 130mph like you're going 75.

emPoWaH - I get the same glazed look. So I've kinda stopped mentioning diesel in conversations unless asked. I simply let the MPG's do the talking. Have friends with nearly an identical model with the 3.0i and they keep asking me what my MPG's are. It makes them mad every time, but I told them before they bought to look very closely at diesel. Even offered for them to drive ours. I smile inside while have a concerned look for them on my face.
txagbmw commented:
October 7, 2013, 1:43 pm

I had a F250 King Ranch 09. I hated that truck. It did not have the pull many talk about or that feel in the X5d. You could pull out on the road floor it and it
went but nothing to go hey about. Now I did drive a GMC before buying and that truck would spin the wheels if floored. I went with the Ford because of the
better looking interior and exterior over gov't motors. MPG was a joke too it might have gotten 12mpg hwy. Ford and dealers knew this but nothing could do.
Yeah they will pull a mobile house down the road, but not in comfort for its passengers

So was a little hesitant on the X5d. But salesman kept saying you got to drive it. I do like it, has all the options, color wanted etc. But at end of 4
going to leary to keep it. Hoping in 4 BMW has a fix to keep them going out of warranty and not costing a fortune.
jesus_man commented:
October 7, 2013, 1:49 pm

Yeah, 2003 to 2010 were not so good years for the Ford Diesel. But I am hoping to replace my '02 with a late model in the next couple years. I think Ford has THE truck right now if you need a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel.

But I really didn't buy the X5 for pulling power, although there is another thread that shows it does pretty well.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 7, 2013, 8:40 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by jesus_man View Post
Yeah, 2003 to 2010 were not so good years for the Ford Diesel. But I am hoping to replace my '02 with a late model in the next couple years. I think Ford has THE truck right now if you need a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel.

But I really didn't buy the X5 for pulling power, although there is another thread that shows it does pretty well.
Yessir, stay away from the 6.0 diesel Fords, junk motors.

BTW, is a new BMW diesel able to run at least on B20?

Thanks,
Dave
d geek commented:
October 7, 2013, 9:08 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave's325xi View Post
...
BTW, is a new BMW diesel able to run at least on B20?

Thanks,
Dave
They are limited to the content allowed in regular diesel (5% biodiesel).
This could pose a problem in some states such as IL where it is a challenge to find biodiesel <11%. VW has taken the step of allowing up to B20 for cars registered in that state, but requiring more frequent oil changes.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 7, 2013, 9:27 pm

OK, so only B5? Many of the US trucks are B20 too!
Dave's325xi commented:
October 8, 2013, 11:52 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by d geek View Post
They are limited to the content allowed in regular diesel (5% biodiesel).
This could pose a problem in some states such as IL where it is a challenge to find biodiesel <11%. VW has taken the step of allowing up to B20 for cars registered in that state, but requiring more frequent oil changes.
So the D2 in IL is B11 at the pump? I don't think Ohio has any. Nearby Pa is B4.

Thanks,
Dave
d geek commented:
October 8, 2013, 12:54 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave's325xi View Post
So the D2 in IL is B11 at the pump? ...
D2 may have up to 5% biodiesel, per the ASTM spec. Biodiesel content labeling for up to B5 is dependent on state law. Here in TX they need to label all diesel if it has any biodiesel content. Not sure about elsewhere.
My understanding is that most diesel pumps in IL have B11, since that is the mixture that takes full advantage of the tax incentives. I believe those pumps carry the "between 5 and 20% biodiesel content" label. If you find a pump in IL that does not have this label, then it should be D2 (which may actually be B5 ).
ukwildcat commented:
October 8, 2013, 6:48 pm

I looked very closely at the diesel this time, but..

1. I have a short daily commute (20 miles roundtrip)
2. I don't really drive a lot of miles (right about 15K a year, though - would you consider that high?)
3. Two dealers didn't have a single current diesel 5 series model to test (just a few 3 series)

4. We have a bit of an issue with diesel availability, and I'll explain because I'm curious what others have..

- lots of stations HAVE diesel, but it's "for offroad use only." You don't know this until you stop and look.
- several stations have regular highway diesel, but only one pump
- when I filled up a 3 series diesel loaner, I had to wait in line behind a huge commercial vehicle
- many stations have NONE. I don't really think this is a big problem overall compared to the others, though.

Also, the loaner 3 series diesel was fine but didn't really impress me. I don't think it 'subtracts' from the gasoline version, but for my needs it doesn't make a lot of sense.
cas commented:
October 8, 2013, 9:27 pm

I have since sold my 2011 335d. But I do plan on purchasing or leasing another diesel . Most likely a 535d. They are certainly amazing . Hoping they up the horsepower in either the 3 or the 5 series like they have in the UK.
jesus_man commented:
October 9, 2013, 3:31 am

I haven't lived in an area where diesel pumps weren't prevalent. I guess it's mainly due to growing up in a CO farming community, then moving to TX for a short time, back to CO and now Europe. Sorry it's such a hassle for you.

Yeah 15k miles a year is pretty low for today's standards, although insurance would like to think otherwise.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 9, 2013, 8:51 am

Yes, that's the problem I have, pull into a big station w 12 stations & diesel is only available in 2 of them & naturally only clueless people in gassers are blocking! Or some stations either offer K1 or D2.

Let's get w it here,
Dave
jesus_man commented:
October 9, 2013, 9:04 am

Oh, I know all about that... Wanted to post a sign on the pump stating "if filling up with gasoline please use gasoline only pumps when available. Diesel only available on xx pumps". It may be just ignorant people not paying attention and taking what are generally the easiest pumps to access because they expect big trucks there. Best place in CO where I last lived for diesel was at the Safeway, but it was a mess to get in and out of there during "rush hour" with the small lot they had. Many a time I considered looking into putting my own station in that had totally separate diesel and gasoline pumps with better ingress and egress.
335dFan commented:
October 9, 2013, 9:29 am

Have been driving diesels since '86. Rarely have fill up problems anywhere I have traveled.


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app
Dave's325xi commented:
October 9, 2013, 2:07 pm

I'll take one of those signs. Ignorance must be Bliss!

Dave
hansluc commented:
October 10, 2013, 10:55 am

I've yet to purchase, but I'll definitely be getting a diesel, and here's why. Despite the initial price premium, I'm purchasing it for the long haul. There is something that appeals to both my rational/emotional sides to drive a vehicle that has plenty of kick that also delivers superior economy. I also can't discount the "vote with your dollars" aspect of the purchase of a diesel BMW. I feel very strongly about the technology and efficiency behind the product BMW is bringing to our shores the purchase of a petrol engine would simply not reflect what I want to see in the US marketplace.
txagbmw commented:
October 10, 2013, 12:20 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy335dOwner View Post
Have been driving diesels since '86. Rarely have fill up problems anywhere I have traveled.


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app

I remember the 80's and finding diesel if was not on a major road. Took a new
GMC diesel family had to east Texas. LOL Well on the way one tank quit working.
and running on vapors in the other. Every small town did not have diesel unless
could find a trucking company. Finally got into college station, how
made it still do not know. So off the beaten path was hard.

Than rest of the way kept smelling diesel. When got to families place came to find
a fuel line broke and diesel was pumping all over the engine. Why it did not catch on
fire another mystery. I never drove that diesel again out of town. We got off on a
bad foot
d geek commented:
October 10, 2013, 12:52 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by txagbmw View Post
... running on vapors ...
a fuel line broke and diesel was pumping all over the engine. Why it did not catch on
fire another mystery....
Because diesel fuel is not as volatile as gasoline and does not have a "vapor" state, you are not going to get a fire unless a flame is directly on the fuel
jesus_man commented:
October 10, 2013, 1:27 pm

That's why you light your campfires with diesel, not gasoline!
Dave's325xi commented:
October 10, 2013, 8:04 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by hansluc View Post
I've yet to purchase, but I'll definitely be getting a diesel, and here's why. Despite the initial price premium, I'm purchasing it for the long haul. There is something that appeals to both my rational/emotional sides to drive a vehicle that has plenty of kick that also delivers superior economy. I also can't discount the "vote with your dollars" aspect of the purchase of a diesel BMW. I feel very strongly about the technology and efficiency behind the product BMW is bringing to our shores the purchase of a petrol engine would simply not reflect what I want to see in the US marketplace.
Total agreement! When was the 1st year for the diesel to reappear here in the US?

Dave
d geek commented:
October 10, 2013, 9:06 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave's325xi View Post
Total agreement! When was the 1st year for the diesel to reappear here in the US?

Dave
The BMW 335d and x5 xDrive 35d first showed up in 2009.
txagbmw commented:
October 10, 2013, 10:31 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by d geek View Post
Because diesel fuel is not as volatile as gasoline and does not have a "vapor" state, you are not going to get a fire unless a flame is directly on the fuel
Guess the motor was well sealed. Especially the exhaust manifolds. If it had,,, been like
one of those hollywood road trip films. If could go wrong it did. That vehicle made
150,000 miles of hard Ranch life. If I had to drive into town and pick something up,
just never shut it off, just locked door and did what had too. People would go you
left you vehicle running LOL. We kept WD40 under the seat, to fire up. Don't see
that happening with a 35d. Hole in air cleaner, squirt and go
Dave's325xi commented:
October 11, 2013, 8:25 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by d geek View Post
The BMW 335d and x5 xDrive 35d first showed up in 2009.
Thanks for educating me! I'll have to drive this one for awhile till I can afford one of those 09 335d's.

Thanks again,
Dave
DaveN007 commented:
October 11, 2013, 12:59 pm

I have a 150 mile trip to the office once a week or so. That ends up being a 500 mile drive over the course of three days.

I am getting 36 mpg despite my driving like I stole the car.

I do it all without stopping for fuel.

I do it with just about as much usable performance as you can really take advantage of.

The 335d is a freaking miracle car as far as I am concerned.

Turbo + Diesel is amazing.

My life is too short to spend that much time in my car and have it be anything less than the Ultimate Driving Machine.
Philm35 commented:
October 11, 2013, 5:55 pm

When I was shopping for cars, I wanted to be a responsible human and get a car that would achieve 30MPG minimum. But I also wanted something with some performance and great handling. The pickin's were slim. I strongly considered a Mini Cooper Clubman S. One day I got a promotional mailer from BMW offering a $50 gas card for test driving a 335d. I had never considered a diesel. I thought, why not give it a go? Within a minute of getting on the road in the D, I was in love. There is no better combination of fuel economy and performance (except Tesla Model S).
jesus_man commented:
October 12, 2013, 5:54 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philm35 View Post
I had never considered a diesel. I thought, why not give it a go? Within a minute of getting on the road in the D, I was in love.
More Americans need to do just that. Compare apples to apples. Drive the ___i, then the ___d. It's hard to do that because so few diesel variations of cars exist, but if BMW and VW's diesel sales sky rocketed, the other auto manufacturers would take notice and would hopefully take steps to get their diesel powered vehicles to the US. It's starting to gain popularity, but so much more could be done!
Pierre Louis commented:
October 12, 2013, 7:42 am

Torque. I like it better than RPM.
335dFan commented:
October 12, 2013, 9:44 am

I responded to this once already, but would like to post an addendum:
1. I liked the idea of a diesel because it was a bit different than the "crowd"; it was (and still is in the USA) somewhat unique. Not sure how I'll feel if the diesel thing really takes off, other than it may give me more choices.
2. That's the same reason I was drawn to the BMW 2002 back in 1969. Very few in the USA knew about this little pocket rocket.
3. For those who experienced the gas lines back during the various oil embargoes, as I am old enough to remember, it was always easier and mostly still is to find diesel and/or an open diesel pump than to find gas or a shorter line to refuel.
4. The other reason, that I have yet to capitalize on, is that I felt I could use diesel fuel more easily in crisis situations, like to burn in a lamp, and I always felt that when I finally buy a generator, it will probably be a diesel generator. Heck, at one time I was thinking of using my old Jetta diesel through an inverter and marine cell battery to be my temporary home generator in an emergency. Never did that either.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:08 am

I didn't even know BMW had a diesel that long ago. I always hear about the VW, MB, Volvo, Toyota, but never a BMW in the IDI diesel forums!

Keep up the good work, don't be a weasel, drive a diesel!

Dave
d geek commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:16 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave's325xi View Post
I didn't even know BMW had a diesel that long ago. I always hear about the VW, MB, Volvo, Toyota, but never a BMW in the IDI diesel forums!...
The previous diesel BMW brought over was the 524td in 1985 and 86. The '69 2002 Happy referred to was a gasser. I believe he was saying that he enjoyed the uniqueness of the 2002, not that it was a diesel.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:34 am

Thanks. He made mention of the diesel lines during the gas crisis being short that where I was confused, also me not being famliar w a 2002. I will do a search & check it out!

Thanks again,
Dave
Needsdecaf commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:49 am

I didn't buy a diesel BMW, as I wasn't liking the looks of the refreshed X5 that was coming out (a bit on the fence about this but no regrets) so I bought a Diesel Cayenne. So the reasons are not apples to apples but similar.

The Cayenne lineup (at the bottom) consists of the gas V6, the Diesel V6, and the V8S (likely replaced by a TTV6 in 2015). The Diesel is $3k more than an automatic V6, and the V8S is a LOT more. The Diesel has less HP than the V6 gasser (240 vs. 300) but more torque than the gas V8S (406 vs. 395). It is rated at 20/29 which is loads better than the S and a good bit better than the V6 gasser.

But moreover, the feel of the drive is much different. In a mid-sized SUV, the gasser V6 requires a 2 and 3 gear downshift to move on the highway, whereas my diesel stays in 8th and just picks up speed silently and serenely. The V8S is more of a sports car, which is fun, but in a good sized SUV is a bit of an oxymoron. Plus it starts to get ridiculously expensive with options.

For an X5, it's not as apples to apples as the 35i has a turbo and much better torque characteristics than the N/A V6 in the Porsche. But (in the twin turbo E70 at least) the feeling of effortless thrust was there. The E70 35d had better top end than my single turbo V6 Cayenne too, as it did have 25 more HP. It was a great combination. When I heard the single turbo 30d engine was coming to the X5 that was the final nail in the coffin, and I pulled the trigger on the Porsche. Waiting until early next year would have been tough too.

Just under 5,000 miles on our Cayenne and I love it. I've had one problem, a wonky fuel sending unit that required a visit to the dealer, and I had the opportunity to hop into a V6 Cayenne and that really convicted my purchase. I love the diesel drive so much better, it's not funny.

Having said that, I do not like the lack of top end for sedan duty. I'd have to drive a 535d or 328d to see if they also lacked top end punch. In that smaller vehicle, I'd appreciate winding it out to the redline and going someplace!
UncleJ commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:50 am

The gas line years (green flags, odd and even license plate days, 10 gallon max etc.) were grim years for those of us who lived through them. I even kept a '57 Chev p/u filled with gas (commercial plates could get gas on any day) as a "fuel reserve". After things sorted out, I sold the truck for twice what I paid for it -- 57's becoming so popular.
But I digress -- there were many marques with diesels back then. Along with the usual suspects, Lincoln even used a BMW 524td diesel for a short time, Volvo, Nissan, Toyota, and others all offered oil burners. The bloom came off the rose when the gas situation sorted itself out and the GM diesel debacle soured folks on the fuel. To be fair, many of these were "smokers" and not anywhere near the sophisticated engines we have now. My little MB 180db would lay a smoke screen (worthy of a Destroyer) going up a hill at full throttle, and it was in great condition. Some of the smaller mini-pickups are still around too. Every now and again I will see a Rabbit diesel p/u or a Datsun diesel still running around. The only d-cars I see from that era are the MB's though. They did seem to last!
335dFan commented:
October 12, 2013, 10:53 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by d geek View Post
The previous diesel BMW brought over was the 524td in 1985 and 86. The '69 2002 Happy referred to was a gasser. I believe he was saying that he enjoyed the uniqueness of the 2002, not that it was a diesel.
True dat!
335dFan commented:
October 12, 2013, 11:01 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Needsdecaf View Post
Having said that, I do not like the lack of top end for sedan duty. I'd have to drive a 535d or 328d to see if they also lacked top end punch. In that smaller vehicle, I'd appreciate winding it out to the redline and going someplace!
I'm not one for the detailed statistics and test runs, so my comment is more of the gut feel type. The 335d owners might confirm that it does seem to run out of steam a bit when you get at USA extra-legal speeds. But I found when I installed the JBD piggyback the improvement was to be found in those same above 60mph+ speeds. I noticed it almost immediately after I installed the device, and even set at 60% the improvement was tangible. Within a half-hour or so after installing it I was merging onto I-95 north on an on-ramp in the D.C. suburbs and I applied pedal-to-the-metal, and rather effortlessly I found myself way over the legal speed. I think other 335d owners with the JBD might confirm that. Kinda like warp mode.

One other anecdotal comment. When I did the BMW NCC HPDE at the Jefferson Circuit in September 2012, I noticed that the gassers, even the M cars, were not able to catch me on the straights before the next turn. If I exited the turn ahead of them, the only way they could pass would be if I let them. I mostly let them because they were mostly better than I was in the twisties and I didn't want to hold them up. On the Jefferson Circuit, which is a short technical circuit, the straights are not very long and the 335d (this was without the JBD) had the punch from 40-100 such that I could get a jump on them every time. On a longer circuit with longer straights the story would have been different I'm sure as the gassers could then wind up through the higher RPM ranges. We'll see how that phenomenon works at the longer Shenandoah Circuit next month (and with the JBD).
Needsdecaf commented:
October 12, 2013, 5:34 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy335dOwner View Post
I'm not one for the detailed statistics and test runs, so my comment is more of the gut feel type. The 335d owners might confirm that it does seem to run out of steam a bit when you get at USA extra-legal speeds. But I found when I installed the JBD piggyback the improvement was to be found in those same above 60mph+ speeds. I noticed it almost immediately after I installed the device, and even set at 60% the improvement was tangible. Within a half-hour or so after installing it I was merging onto I-95 north on an on-ramp in the D.C. suburbs and I applied pedal-to-the-metal, and rather effortlessly I found myself way over the legal speed. I think other 335d owners with the JBD might confirm that. Kinda like warp mode.

One other anecdotal comment. When I did the BMW NCC HPDE at the Jefferson Circuit in September 2012, I noticed that the gassers, even the M cars, were not able to catch me on the straights before the next turn. If I exited the turn ahead of them, the only way they could pass would be if I let them. I mostly let them because they were mostly better than I was in the twisties and I didn't want to hold them up. On the Jefferson Circuit, which is a short technical circuit, the straights are not very long and the 335d (this was without the JBD) had the punch from 40-100 such that I could get a jump on them every time. On a longer circuit with longer straights the story would have been different I'm sure as the gassers could then wind up through the higher RPM ranges. We'll see how that phenomenon works at the longer Shenandoah Circuit next month (and with the JBD).
The two turbos in the 35d engine found in the E90 3 and E70 X5 are sequential turbos, one small for lower end torque and responsiveness, and one larger for higher RPM operation. The HP curve on that engine is fairly robust up high for a diesel. It's still only 265 vs. 300 on a equivalent N55 engine so it won't have quite the pull, but it's not as bad as the single turbo on my V6 Cayenne. The BMW engine has a better top end to my eyes and rear end.

For the F10 and the F15 X5, America gets the Euro 30d engine rebadged as a 35d. It's only a single turbo and is down some 50 odd HP to the 35d euro engine. Had that engine been coming, I'd have waited for it for sure.
Penguin commented:
October 12, 2013, 6:48 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by pix335i View Post
So - what made you buy your diesel? Torque? Fuel Economy? Reliablity? Something Else?
Simple answer in my case. I bought my X5 in October 2009 when the $4,500 eco credit was going. I felt the stock gasoline I-6 engine was just a little low on power, and didn't want a V-8 due to poor fuel economy and a perception of lower reliability for BMW V-8.

With the eco-credit bringing the cost of the diesel to less than the gasoline I-6, and the adidtional $1,800 savings on my Federal income tax for buying a diesel, it was a no-brainer decision for me to go diesel at a discount of $6,300 vs. gasoline.

I really like the flat torque curve of the diesel, but if I were buying today, I'd only be wiling to pay a $1,000-1,500 premium for the diesel vs. gasoline.
TwillieMan11 commented:
October 15, 2013, 12:03 pm

I commute 25miles to work each day and my petrol powered car 330ci was getting about 26mpg which sucked, so I sold it and purchased a used 530d and now see 38-41mpg on my drives to work! I also love the torque that is associated with diesel engines, I always feel that I have the power to pass when I need to.
Dave's325xi commented:
October 15, 2013, 12:18 pm

I love the fuel MPG boost!