CNET On Cars : On the road with the BMW i3

by Bernie McGroarty on December 16, 2013, 3:10 pm
CNet gives BMW's new i3 the complete review. From chassis to driving, check out what the i3 is all about. The i3 arrives to the US in the 2nd quarter of 2014 and will start at around $42k, that's before any incentives/rebates, look to ante up another $4k for the optional range extender. If you get the opportunity to drive one, post up your thoughts. Looking forward to hearing what others have to say about the i3.



Check out the i3's first hot lap here.

Read up on the i3 here.


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7 responses to CNET On Cars : On the road with the BMW i3

anE934fun commented:
December 29, 2013, 4:31 pm

It is a shame that the range extender option didn't make the i3 a Volt-killer. The other thing that I can't get past are the skinny tires - they look like 4 space-saver tires were fitted to the car. Maybe BMW will address these issues in the i3 LCI edition?
sirbikes commented:
January 3, 2014, 8:56 pm

Volt, i3, Tesla ... we won't be seeing many plug-in EVs in North Carolina. Not only do you not get any tax credit, but they are now going to hit you with an extra tax. They call it a "fair" tax, to pay for their share of the roads, since EV owners are not buying gas and thus paying any gas taxes. I wonder what's next for this state, extra taxes for bicycles?
tiburonh commented:
January 6, 2014, 1:37 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirbikes View Post
Volt, i3, Tesla ... we won't be seeing many plug-in EVs in North Carolina. Not only do you not get any tax credit, but they are now going to hit you with an extra tax. They call it a "fair" tax, to pay for their share of the roads, since EV owners are not buying gas and thus paying any gas taxes. I wonder what's next for this state, extra taxes for bicycles?
Sorry to hear about that, but, as a current Californian (and former neighbor in Knoxville, TN), I can't feel a ton of sympathy.

With your new flat income tax, you in NC are paying about half of what I am. Your sales tax is also a lot less than mine. Ditto with your gas tax. Likewise with your property taxes. Heck, not that it makes a difference to us folks who are alive, but am I right in thinking you don't even have an inheritance tax?

The overall cost of living in NC is so much lower than it is in CA that no one there should ever think they need a subsidy to do the right thing and drive an EV!
sirbikes commented:
January 6, 2014, 9:40 am

It's why I moved to NC from CA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiburonh View Post
Sorry to hear about that, but, as a current Californian (and former neighbor in Knoxville, TN), I can't feel a ton of sympathy.

With your new flat income tax, you in NC are paying about half of what I am. Your sales tax is also a lot less than mine. Ditto with your gas tax. Likewise with your property taxes. Heck, not that it makes a difference to us folks who are alive, but am I right in thinking you don't even have an inheritance tax?

The overall cost of living in NC is so much lower than it is in CA that no one there should ever think they need a subsidy to do the right thing and drive an EV!
chuck92116 commented:
January 7, 2014, 12:55 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirbikes View Post
Volt, i3, Tesla ... we won't be seeing many plug-in EVs in North Carolina. Not only do you not get any tax credit, but they are now going to hit you with an extra tax. They call it a "fair" tax, to pay for their share of the roads, since EV owners are not buying gas and thus paying any gas taxes. I wonder what's next for this state, extra taxes for bicycles?
Federal tax credit should still apply. $7500 on an I3.


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After Hours commented:
January 7, 2014, 3:00 pm

My daughter bought a Prius early on. Toyota managed to make a car that appealed to her eco-sensitivities and remained very practical, with room for their kids' stuff under the hatch and the range of a hybrid as opposed to an all-electric. BMW seems to have made the I-3 to appeal to a much smaller market. I would think it would be a relatively expensive errand car, good for short commutes and Saturday errands, but a household would need a main car for longer trips and larger loads. (The car-swapping for longer trips means that BMW sees the problem, but I live 45 minutes from my dealer and would rather not make that round trip twice every time my week-end plans included a trip to the beach or the ski hill.) As a long-time BMW fan, I would want more sport, while my eco-inclined daughter would not be caught dead owning a BMW. It looks to me like a big gamble for BMW. My guess is that the I-3 will not do well, unless BMW manages to do something to give it the range and refueling potential of a hybrid.
LivinSD commented:
February 18, 2014, 6:34 pm

I'm personally very interested in this car. I don't live downtown, but I do live in a very populated area. I have a dealer within 4 miles of my house. My longest regular drive is to the airport which is 35 miles away and offers "free" charging stations for e-cars. I also have tons short sub 5 miles trips I make to shopping and the beach. And in CA, we can get $10k in tax credits in total (fed & State). This has the potential to be a wonderful choice for me. Have to drive it first though.