BMW 540d B57 Diesel Engine Specs

by Tim Jones on March 27, 2017, 12:51 pm
”bmw 540d 57 engine”

The 5 Series diesel is staring production for the US in July and everyone wants to know what is under the hood. BMW giving the US one heck of an engine for the 540d, in fact BMW is calling it the world’s most powerful six-cylinder diesel engine. The B57 unit generates maximum output of 400 hp and peak torque of 560 lb-ft.

The new 3.0-litre six-cylinder in-line engine was developed on the basis of the BMW Group’s latest generation of power units. Its BMW TwinPower Turbo technology includes multi-stage turbocharging with four turbochargers and common-rail direct injection, the latest update of which generates maximum pressure in excess of 2,500 bar. These and other technological highlights allow significant improvements in power delivery, pulling power and efficiency. Much credit goes to a new form of multi-stage turbocharging, which now brings together four turbochargers. This enables boost pressure to be built up even more quickly at lower engine speeds and therefore prompts incredibly swift responses to throttle applications from idle.

The new generation of the world’s most gifted six-cylinder diesel engine develops its maximum output of 400 hp at 4,400 rpm. Its optimised performance characteristics are reflected most prominently in torque development that gathers pace rapidly and from low engine speeds. Indeed, the engine serves up over 332 lb-ft of torque at just 1,000 rpm and puts its maximum 560 lb-ft on tap between 2,000 and 3,000 rpm. The engine’s large and sustained wave of thrust and the eight-speed Steptronic transmission tuned to make the most of it together ensure that instant and ferocious bursts of pace can also be achieved under throttle inputs at higher speeds.

The most powerful diesel engine ever offered by BMW also stands apart with a balance of brawn and fuel economy unmatched by any rival in this engine segment. A 19 hp (5 percent) increase in output and peak torque up by 15 lb-ft are accompanied by a 11 percent reduction in average fuel consumption and emissions over the predecessor model.

Top-of-the-line diesel features numerous technological highlights

As with the outgoing unit, the cylinder head and crankcase are manufactured in a special high-pressure compression process. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) ensure the aluminium castings are particularly strong. The assembly of the main bearing caps and cylinder head is based on a tie rod concept, complete with a central screw to give extra strength. Other special features include the now five-layer cylinder head gasket, cylinder bores with a twin-wire arc-sprayed coating and pistons made from an aluminium/silicon alloy with remelted bowl rims, bronze liners in the pin eyes and centrally controlled cooling.

The latest generation of common-rail direct injection technology takes care of the fuel supply. The piezo injectors, whose maximum injection pressure has been increased to over 2,500 bar, ensure extremely precise metering and fine atomisation of the fuel. As a result, the engine’s efficiency has increased and its emissions have been reduced. The exhaust treatment technology includes not only a diesel particulate filter and NOX storage catalytic converter, which are positioned in a combined housing close to the engine, but also an SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system with AdBlue injection.

Four turbochargers working together as a precisely coordinated team

The effectiveness and performance characteristics of the new engine are determined largely by the first ever use of a fourth turbocharger and, above all, the precisely coordinated interplay of all the components in the turbocharging system. As with the outgoing engine, the performance-boosting flow of compressed air into the combustion chambers is generated by multi-stage turbocharging. The high-pressure stage revolves around two compact turbos with variable turbine geometry integrated into a single housing, while a single, very large low-pressure turbocharger has been replaced by two smaller – and therefore faster-responding – units. The latest-generation Digital Diesel Electronics (DDE) responsible for engine management adopt a precisely defined deployment strategy to coordinate the activity of the individual turbos, the position of the high-pressure system’s variable vanes, and the regulation of the change-over and bypass flaps, the exhaust gas butterfly valve, the wastegate and the intercooler in response to the operating situation and throttle inputs.

Generally speaking, the two low-pressure turbochargers and one of the two high-pressure turbos are permanently in action. Only under hard acceleration from idle will the two low-pressure turbochargers be bypassed by means of a flap control system. This allows boost pressure to be built up even more quickly. The second high-pressure turbocharger is brought into play at an engine speed of about 2,500 rpm.

Another new feature is exhaust gas recirculation for the low-pressure stage of the turbocharging system as well as the high-pressure stage. This measure increases the effectiveness of the turbochargers and therefore of the engine as a whole. In this way, levels of nitrogen oxide emissions under high loads are also reduced. To enhance efficiency, the engine also employs an indirect system of charge air cooling with higher capacity as well as additional compressor backplate cooling for the low-pressure turbochargers. Key to the latter is a separate low-temperature circuit – independent of the engine’s cooling system – which includes heat exchangers and an electrically operated coolant pump.

The B57 diesel engine propels the 750d xDrive from 0 to 100 km/h / 62 mph in just 4.6 seconds, 0-60 for the 540d should be in the 4.4 second range. Production starts in July, we will have pricing and ordering details in June.



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65 responses to BMW 540d B57 Diesel Engine Specs

vtknight commented:
March 27, 2017, 2:10 pm

I am surprised this car isn't quicker and faster than the M550ix. It's lighter with almost 100 lb feet more torque. The 540 is 300 lbs lighter? The simple math is every 10 lbs is worth 1 HP - so 30 HP gained and you are looking at 430/560. Maybe BMW is beinb politically correct? I don't like the diesel part (stations etc).

I say this as a new M550ix owner lol.
BobRae commented:
March 27, 2017, 3:39 pm

So the G30 540d will have the same performance as the 540i, correct? I wonder if there is a fuel economy savings over that car. If not, I think I'd just get the 540. I know people really like the torque of the diesel though.
alex md commented:
March 27, 2017, 4:07 pm

Do you know if B57 will make its way to X5?


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ct545i commented:
March 27, 2017, 6:38 pm

What's the source of this information? Are you sure this diesel engine is destined for the US in the 5-series? I have my doubts, to be honest.
madhotm3 commented:
March 27, 2017, 6:38 pm

Why would the engine out of a 750d make it's way into a 540d??
I'm thinking (and hoping) this will be the M550d ...Regardless, I really hope you are right and this engine makes it to US.


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e325rkh commented:
March 27, 2017, 6:50 pm

What was the historical price difference between the diesel (535d) and turbo 6 (535i)?
tim330i commented:
March 27, 2017, 6:53 pm

The source of my info is someone who has pieced together a series of BMW info sources to come up with his insight into BMW's future. The info has been right time and time again, but I agree the engine does seem like an odd choice. I can only report on what info I have, and this is coming from a solid source I trust.

Tim
ct545i commented:
March 27, 2017, 7:18 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by tim330i View Post
The source of my info is someone who has pieced together a series of BMW info sources to come up with his insight into BMW's future. The info has been right time and time again, but I agree the engine does seem like an odd choice. I can only report on what info I have, and this is coming from a solid source I trust.

Tim
I sure hope it comes true. Thanks.
madhotm3 commented:
March 27, 2017, 9:30 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by tim330i View Post
The source of my info is someone who has pieced together a series of BMW info sources to come up with his insight into BMW's future. The info has been right time and time again, but I agree the engine does seem like an odd choice. I can only report on what info I have, and this is coming from a solid source I trust.

Tim


Of course, and thanks for reporting. I hope your source is right again ... I'll be all over this beast.



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ImolaRedM commented:
March 27, 2017, 9:48 pm

If this is true, it would be fantastic. I would get this G30 over a M550i if both were available right now. That much torque is intoxicating. This engine would be better suited for daily driving vs the V8 in the M550i, plus it would have better fuel consumption and the weight of the car would be significantly less than the portly V8.
Fore commented:
March 27, 2017, 9:57 pm

My order would be in, too. Should be an exciting announcement.
vtknight commented:
March 27, 2017, 10:57 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobRae View Post
So the G30 540d will have the same performance as the 540i, correct? I wonder if there is a fuel economy savings over that car. If not, I think I'd just get the 540. I know people really like the torque of the diesel though.
I cannot see how the 540d would be anything but almost as fast or as fast as the 550ix. Even by the stats given, it is 3-4 tenths quicker than the 540i. I would also imagine being diesel it has incredible MPG. If it weren't for the diesel stations - this would be an awesome choice for an all round car - lighter, quick and economic.
n1das commented:
March 28, 2017, 11:12 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by vtknight View Post
I cannot see how the 540d would be anything but almost as fast or as fast as the 550ix. Even by the stats given, it is 3-4 tenths quicker than the 540i. I would also imagine being diesel it has incredible MPG. If it weren't for the diesel stations - this would be an awesome choice for an all round car - lighter, quick and economic.
What is the issue with the diesel stations?? Contrary to popular belief, diesel fuel is not hard to find yet the myth of hard to find fuel continues and is mostly perpetuated by gasser drivers. And with a tank range of around 600 miles compared to the gasser's 300 to 400 mile range, you actually have more flexibility with when and where to fuel up. To help put things into perspective, when I drive my 535d or my X5 35d from NH to FL on vacation, my first fuel stop isn't until I get down into Virginia. The gassers actually have to worry more about getting fuel than I do.

I've been driving (only) diesel cars for the past 15 years and logged a combined total of more than 800k miles in them and have never had any diesel fuel issue at all. Diesel is fuel hard to find?? That's news to me.

I haven't owned a gasoline car in over 10 years....and there is absolutely no way I'm ever going back to one again if I can help it. With my driving around 1k miles per week, I have absolutely no regrets at all owning and driving diesel vehicles. I'm hopelessly addicted to the diesel's Weapons Grade torque and better efficiency and MPGs coming as a bonus.

I'm watching all 540d threads with interest.

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pb12 commented:
March 28, 2017, 11:19 pm

Scott26 on the "other" forum says that engine is not federalized for the USA. He's generally exactly right on anything he comments on. I'd say that motor isn't coming to the USA.
n1das commented:
March 28, 2017, 11:30 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by pb12 View Post
Scott26 on the "other" forum says that engine is not federalized for the USA. He's generally exactly right on anything he comments on. I'd say that motor isn't coming to the USA.
Yep. While I'm hoping it does come to the USA, it's vaporware until it's actually here. It would be worthwhile to periodically check EPA and CARB certification databases to look for new 5-series emissions certifications.


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NickDi commented:
March 28, 2017, 11:43 pm

I am hearing that some countries in Europe are pushing to phase out diesel engines due to emissions. The mayors of Paris, Madrid, Athens and Mexico City announced plans to ban diesel cars and vans off their roads by 2025. London plans to add extra commuter tax for diesels. Is anyone concerned about the future of diesel cars??
vtknight commented:
March 29, 2017, 12:14 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by n1das View Post
What is the issue with the diesel stations?? Contrary to popular belief, diesel fuel is not hard to find yet the myth of hard to find fuel continues and is mostly perpetuated by gasser drivers. And with a tank range of around 600 miles compared to the gasser's 300 to 400 mile range, you actually have more flexibility with when and where to fuel up. To help put things into perspective, when I drive my 535d or my X5 35d from NH to FL on vacation, my first fuel stop isn't until I get down into Virginia. The gassers actually have to worry more about getting fuel than I do.

I've been driving (only) diesel cars for the past 15 years and logged a combined total of more than 800k miles in them and have never had any diesel fuel issue at all. Diesel is fuel hard to find?? That's news to me.

I haven't owned a gasoline car in over 10 years....and there is absolutely no way I'm ever going back to one again if I can help it. With my driving around 1k miles per week, I have absolutely no regrets at all owning and driving diesel vehicles. I'm hopelessly addicted to the diesel's Weapons Grade torque and better efficiency and MPGs coming as a bonus.

I'm watching all 540d threads with interest.

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I can answer that - availability. Diesel is fairly widespread - but not everywhere where I am. So it becomes an issue. I am happy you are enjoying your diesel cars though. They are not for me.
Eagle11 commented:
March 29, 2017, 3:19 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by vtknight View Post
I can answer that - availability. Diesel is fairly widespread - but not everywhere where I am. So it becomes an issue. I am happy you are enjoying your diesel cars though. They are not for me.
You have Toronto listed as the city you live, and you are saying that diesel isn't widely available?
RonBurgundy commented:
March 29, 2017, 8:09 am

I'd be very surprised if this motor makes it stateside... the US bound F10 535d was the euro 530d.


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n1das commented:
March 29, 2017, 9:41 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDi View Post
I am hearing that some countries in Europe are pushing to phase out diesel engines due to emissions. The mayors of Paris, Madrid, Athens and Mexico City announced plans to ban diesel cars and vans off their roads by 2025. London plans to add extra commuter tax for diesels. Is anyone concerned about the future of diesel cars??
Not concerned at all. If I someday add another diesel vehicle to my all-fleet, it likely will be a diesel pickup truck.

The mayors of those cities are throwing the baby out with the bath water. After all diesels are "banned" they will see their smog problems only get worse as they deal with the weekend ozone effect 7 days a week instead of only on weekends when there is about 90% less diesel truck traffic.

http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/emissions.html
http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/efficiency.html
http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/performance.html
http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/emissions2014.html
http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/emissions2016.html

Anxiously watching and waiting to see what happens with the 540d. Hopefully it DOES come to the USA.
dga commented:
March 29, 2017, 10:40 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle11 View Post
You have Toronto listed as the city you live, and you are saying that diesel isn't widely available?
Yeah, I don't understand that either since I see tractor trailer trucks everywhere in southern and central Ontario????
n1das commented:
March 29, 2017, 11:19 am

Quote:
Its optimised performance characteristics are reflected most prominently in torque development that gathers pace rapidly and from low engine speeds. Indeed, the engine serves up over 332 lb-ft of torque at just 1,000 rpm and puts its maximum 560 lb-ft on tap between 2,000 and 3,000 rpm.
Now that IS some serious Weapons-Grade TORQUE! The better fuel economy compared to the gassers then comes as a bonus. I expect it will outperform its gasser counterparts while still returning better fuel economy.

The phrase "People buy horsepower but drive TORQUE" says it all.
Art234 commented:
March 29, 2017, 3:52 pm

I have the 2014 535d x drive and it has plenty of power and pep, and I average mid 30's normal driving and 43-45 mpg on the highway. Not shabby for a sub 6 second 0-60.

I love it so much I just bought it off lease. And there are plenty of diesel stations on Long Island, I would say 70-80% have diesel.
vtknight commented:
March 29, 2017, 4:48 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle11 View Post
You have Toronto listed as the city you live, and you are saying that diesel isn't widely available?
Not as widely available as non-diesel fuel. No.
vtknight commented:
March 29, 2017, 4:53 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by dga View Post
Yeah, I don't understand that either since I see tractor trailer trucks everywhere in southern and central Ontario????
I think it's pretty easy to understand; there are less diesel equipped stations than pure gas stations - and the stations that do have them will only have two pumps at those stations.

MPG is not an issue at the very top of my list when deciding on a car - so I am okay buying a premium fuel requiring vehicle. The extra torque is nice and I stand by the fact that I believe the 540d should be very close performance-wise to the new M550. That said - I am happy with the M550ix and buying 94 octane gas.
BobRae commented:
March 29, 2017, 5:20 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by vtknight View Post
I think it's pretty easy to understand; there are less diesel equipped stations than pure gas stations - and the stations that do have them will only have two pumps at those stations.

MPG is not an issue at the very top of my list when deciding on a car - so I am okay buying a premium fuel requiring vehicle. The extra torque is nice and I stand by the fact that I believe the 540d should be very close performance-wise to the new M550. That said - I am happy with the M550ix and buying 94 octane gas.
The M550 will do 0 - 60 in under 4 seconds. the 540d will do it in 4.6 seconds and the 540i will do it in 4.7 seconds. I'd say performance is closer to the 540 than the 550, plus you miss the high revving engines. So, now you're down to differences in fuel economy, but where I live, diesel is 15% more expensive than premium. I guess if you like an oil burner, this will be a great engine for you. If you want to save money, fuel economy of the diesel will have to be 15% better than the 540 to make up for the higher fuel cost. Of course, if you don't mind giving up 1/2 second to 60, no doubt you'll save fuel cost big time, but without a meaningful penalty in every day performance.
vtknight commented:
March 29, 2017, 5:25 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobRae View Post
The M550 will do 0 - 60 in under 4 seconds. the 540d will do it in 4.6 seconds and the 540i will do it in 4.7 seconds. I'd say performance is closer to the 540 than the 550, plus you miss the high revving engines. So, now you're down to differences in fuel economy, but where I live, diesel is 15% more expensive than premium. I guess if you like an oil burner, this will be a great engine for you. If you want to save money, fuel economy of the diesel will have to be 15% better than the 540 to make up for the higher fuel cost. Of course, if you don't mind giving up 1/2 second to 60, no doubt you'll save fuel cost big time, but without a meaningful penalty in every day performance.
Good post.

My question is how accurate are those times? I believe the 540 is several hundred pounds lighter than the 550 - I guessed 300 - which is "equal" to about 30 HP. Plus the 80 lb ft more torque than the M550 and the power is pretty close (one lower HP, higher torque, the other the opposite). I would not be surprised if the 540d is slightly under-spec'd by BMW to not ruffle the M550's feathers. I'm sure there will be a plethora of reviews that are going to be popping up on each for us to find out.

Good to know about the cost of diesel.
BobRae commented:
March 29, 2017, 5:46 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by vtknight View Post
Good post.

My question is how accurate are those times? I believe the 540 is several hundred pounds lighter than the 550 - I guessed 300 - which is "equal" to about 30 HP. Plus the 80 lb ft more torque than the M550 and the power is pretty close (one lower HP, higher torque, the other the opposite). I would not be surprised if the 540d is slightly under-spec'd by BMW to not ruffle the M550's feathers. I'm sure there will be a plethora of reviews that are going to be popping up on each for us to find out.

Good to know about the cost of diesel.
Hard to know how accurate they are. BMW often understates the performance numbers. Have to wait until Car and Drive test the G30 variants. Anyway 4.8 seconds to 60 is quicker than most would need, but .8 (to get to the 550 number) would make a noticeable difference. I think it is more about the power delivery though. I find my 535 F10 to be a bit busy sounding pushing the car to 60 under hard acceleration. The 550 is much quieter and gives you an amazing push as the speed climbs effortlessly. So, the 540d will give you almost 550 performance but without the fuel penalty. I guess we'll have to see what the fuel cost numbers look like with the 540d. Personally i'd like the 550 but fuel economy is likely to be in the 15L/100km range. I'm betting the 540d will show numbers in the high8's/100km in the city. that would be a huge improvement. The F10 I'm currently driving is rated at 11.8L/100Km in the city, but all winter its been using 15L/100. Looks like some relief is on the way (lose the high revving engine though).
vtknight commented:
March 29, 2017, 5:52 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobRae View Post
Hard to know how accurate they are. BMW often understates the performance numbers. Have to wait until Car and Drive test the G30 variants. Anyway 4.8 seconds to 60 is quicker than most would need, but .8 (to get to the 550 number) would make a noticeable difference. I think it is more about the power delivery though. I find my 535 F10 to be a bit busy sounding pushing the car to 60 under hard acceleration. The 550 is much quieter and gives you an amazing push as the speed climbs effortlessly. So, the 540d will give you almost 550 performance but without the fuel penalty. I guess we'll have to see what the fuel cost numbers look like with the 540d. Personally i'd like the 550 but fuel economy is likely to be in the 15L/100km range. I'm betting the 540d will show numbers in the high8's/100km in the city. that would be a huge improvement. The F10 I'm currently driving is rated at 11.8L/100Km in the city, but all winter its been using 15L/100. Looks like some relief is on the way (lose the high revving engine though).
Looking forward to find out!
Tranquility255 commented:
March 29, 2017, 7:43 pm

Question for those of you with the F10 & previous gen diesels, do you go to specific stations for the 51 cetane BMW recommends, or do you fill up with any diesel?? I've seen many threads on this topic and just was curious what y'all think.

For me, 80% of my driving is highway, and diesel is 40-ish cents cheaper than premium. No brainer for me....
madhotm3 commented:
March 29, 2017, 9:20 pm

Not sure why anyone would buy a $70k car and chose the Diesel powered model just "to save money on fuel" ...
Those who want to save money buy Corollas or similar.

If you enjoy the wide torque band, and/or maybe drive a lot and don't like visiting the fuel stations too often- the diesel is for you.


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BMW603 commented:
March 30, 2017, 7:05 am

I love the sound of the diesel- (sadly every gas engine I can hear the tick tick tick at idle ) which is annoying.

The second is the range - 80-100 miles before the needle moves off full. (I only drive 5,000 a year so I hardly need to stop for diesel)

Someplace in-between the power to overtake someone if needed.
Eagle11 commented:
March 30, 2017, 8:58 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by madhotm3 View Post
Not sure why anyone would buy a $70k car and chose the Diesel powered model just "to save money on fuel" ...
Those who want to save money buy Corollas or similar.

If you enjoy the wide torque band, and/or maybe drive a lot and don't like visiting the fuel stations too often- the diesel is for you.


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People buy cars for all sorts od reason's, one can be fuel economy usually those who buy oil burners do so because they save the owners money.
Fore commented:
March 30, 2017, 9:49 am

Diesel for me is the convenience. Stopping to refuel every 500 miles is a whole lot more convenient than every 300 miles (and they have plenty of torque!)
Eagle11 commented:
March 30, 2017, 11:32 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fore View Post
Diesel for me is the convenience. Stopping to refuel every 500 miles is a whole lot more convenient than every 300 miles (and they have plenty of torque!)
Interesting, one would assume that the range of the 535d was greater then 500 miles, my 320 is 600.
Art234 commented:
March 30, 2017, 11:34 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tranquility255 View Post
Question for those of you with the F10 & previous gen diesels, do you go to specific stations for the 51 cetane BMW recommends, or do you fill up with any diesel?? I've seen many threads on this topic and just was curious what y'all think.

For me, 80% of my driving is highway, and diesel is 40-ish cents cheaper than premium. No brainer for me....
In NY there is not 51 cetane available, every pump I have used says 40, but that is a minimum.
I have never had an issue with diesel fuel and my car's performance.

As stated above, diesel is much less expensive than premium here, so if you couple that with the improved fuel economy, it's a double win. Also the torque doesn't hurt
Fore commented:
March 30, 2017, 11:40 am

I do get around 600 on trips, as I expect the gas ones get around 400, but I was referring to regular re-fueling (where I try to to go under 100 miles or so). I might also have a "heavy foot" ; -)
BobRae commented:
March 30, 2017, 12:28 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by madhotm3 View Post
Not sure why anyone would buy a $70k car and chose the Diesel powered model just "to save money on fuel" ...
Those who want to save money buy Corollas or similar.
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Maybe some people just like reducing their carbon footprint? The diesel engine provides an addictive seat of the pants "kick" at low speeds and RPMs, but without the pain in the wallet. In some countries, taxes play a large part in the decision process. Lower emissions and fuel consumption result in lower taxes and other costs.

I think it is false reasoning to think that people who spend $70,000 on a car can afford gas and shouldn't worry about it. Consider that many people have achieved their wealth by making efficient decisions and by paying attention to cost. I know I routinely do that in running my businesses.

You can make the same arguments you make when talking about hybrids. Its hard to see a payout model unless you drive 25,000 miles a year. You can get a larger, more comfortable car than a Prius for less money that doesn't do quite as well as a Prius, so why buy a Prius? The answer by some is: "Even if there is no real payback on a hybrid, I can either give my money to the Arab oil countries or I can give it to Toyota. I choose to give it to Toyota"

So, with BMW, I can choose to give money to the oil companies or I can use that money to dine out with my wife and give the money to a local restaurant.

Hope that helps you understand why not only people with Toyotas watch needless spending.
n1das commented:
March 30, 2017, 1:24 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tranquility255 View Post
Question for those of you with the F10 & previous gen diesels, do you go to specific stations for the 51 cetane BMW recommends, or do you fill up with any diesel?? I've seen many threads on this topic and just was curious what y'all think.

For me, 80% of my driving is highway, and diesel is 40-ish cents cheaper than premium. No brainer for me....
I have yet to find 51 Cetane diesel fuel in the USA. 40 is the federally mandated minimum level and some stations have 45 Cetane fuel. I recall some states mandate 48 Cetane fuel (CA and TX, IIRC). While our fuel is ULSD it is still rotgut compared to what Europe has. That's another reason why I always add some PowerService Diesel Fuel Supplemet (white bottle) with every tankful to increase lubricity, boost Cetane levels, and take care of any water I can't avoid getting.

Have fun!
n1das commented:
March 30, 2017, 2:02 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by madhotm3 View Post
Not sure why anyone would buy a $70k car and chose the Diesel powered model just "to save money on fuel" ...
Those who want to save money buy Corollas or similar.
5 fundamental reasons: Diesel offers a rich blend Economy, Longevity, Performance, TORQUE, and Efficiency. I can speak to all of these points in detail but that is beyond the scope of this thread. There are many more things involved than just saving money on fuel. I am hopelessly addicted to the diesel's weapon-grade TORQUE characteristics and the efficiency. I know what I like for a reason.

I drive a lot, around 1k miles per week, with more than 95% of those miles being highway miles. I also LIKE to drive, like most of us here. After logging a combined total of more than 800k miles in diesel vehicles over the past 15 years, I absolutely WILL NOT own another gasoline car ever again if I can help it. I haven't owned a gasoline car in over 10 years. I have never owned a gasoline BMW...and won't. I've driven gasser BMWs as loaner cars but I will never own any of them.

Quote:
If you enjoy the wide torque band, and/or maybe drive a lot and don't like visiting the fuel stations too often- the diesel is for you.
With my 1000 miles/week of haulin' ar$e on the highway, whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Gassers including hybrids are not an option at all. While there are several cheap gassers on the market that have the same or lower cost per mile compared to my diesel BMWs, they aren't cars I wan't to drive and none of them offer the kick of a turbo.

As someone who likes to drive and drive's a lot, I tend to gravitate toward a "driver's car" type of car and is one of the things that attracts me to BMW. Any gasoline "driver's car" usually comes with an unacceptable fuel economy hit for my driving 1k miles/week. Downsizing the car and/or the performance and driving a gasoline econobox (read: penalty box) to get the fuel economy is not an option. The mileage a Toyota Prius gets is laughable considering what a penalty box the car is to drive. I've owned my share of gasser econoboxes in my younger days and they've never been long term keepers because I always end up wanting out of them and into something else. They are not cars for me. I've also owned a Subaru WRX gasser back in 2001-2002 and it was a blast to drive. With my driving 1k mile/week, feeding the WRX (named "Rex") a full tank of premium gasoline every 2-2.5 days got old and expensive real fast.

With diesel I get to have my cake and eat it too. With my VW TDIs years ago, getting 45 MPGs while driving it like I stole it and having a 700 mile tank range was real nice. With my logging around 1k miles/week, diesel fits my particular use case better than anything else. Whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Very soon after getting my first diesel car in 2002 (VW Golf TDI) and driving 1k miles/week, it wasn't long before realizing that owning anything that runs on gasoline no longer makes sense.

I plan to keep my F10 535d and E70 X5 35d but I'm curious about the 540d.

Have fun!
vtknight commented:
March 30, 2017, 3:17 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by n1das View Post
5 fundamental reasons: Diesel offers a rich blend Economy, Longevity, Performance, TORQUE, and Efficiency. I can speak to all of these points in detail but that is beyond the scope of this thread. There are many more things involved than just saving money on fuel. I am hopelessly addicted to the diesel's weapon-grade TORQUE characteristics and the efficiency. I know what I like for a reason.

I drive a lot, around 1k miles per week, with more than 95% of those miles being highway miles. I also LIKE to drive, like most of us here. After logging a combined total of more than 800k miles in diesel vehicles over the past 15 years, I absolutely WILL NOT own another gasoline car ever again if I can help it. I haven't owned a gasoline car in over 10 years. I have never owned a gasoline BMW...and won't. I've driven gasser BMWs as loaner cars but I will never own any of them.



With my 1000 miles/week of haulin' ar$e on the highway, whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Gassers including hybrids are not an option at all. While there are several cheap gassers on the market that have the same or lower cost per mile compared to my diesel BMWs, they aren't cars I wan't to drive and none of them offer the kick of a turbo.

As someone who likes to drive and drive's a lot, I tend to gravitate toward a "driver's car" type of car and is one of the things that attracts me to BMW. Any gasoline "driver's car" usually comes with an unacceptable fuel economy hit for my driving 1k miles/week. Downsizing the car and/or the performance and driving a gasoline econobox (read: penalty box) to get the fuel economy is not an option. The mileage a Toyota Prius gets is laughable considering what a penalty box the car is to drive. I've owned my share of gasser econoboxes in my younger days and they've never been long term keepers because I always end up wanting out of them and into something else. They are not cars for me. I've also owned a Subaru WRX gasser back in 2001-2002 and it was a blast to drive. With my driving 1k mile/week, feeding the WRX (named "Rex") a full tank of premium gasoline every 2-2.5 days got old and expensive real fast.

With diesel I get to have my cake and eat it too. With my VW TDIs years ago, getting 45 MPGs while driving it like I stole it and having a 700 mile tank range was real nice. With my logging around 1k miles/week, diesel fits my particular use case better than anything else. Whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Very soon after getting my first diesel car in 2002 (VW Golf TDI) and driving 1k miles/week, it wasn't long before realizing that owning anything that runs on gasoline no longer makes sense.

I plan to keep my F10 535d and E70 X5 35d but I'm curious about the 540d.

Have fun!
I think these are fair points; you drive around 2-3 times the average amount of most people -and fuel is an issue. As to the TORQUE - there is no question that diesel torque is a very nice by-product of the continuously injected, high pressure fuel the car can be tuned with.
That said - diesel cars are not the only place you can find torque. As you stated it is a trade off for mpg - and for your situation, without modding/tuning the car, it is a very solid setup for you. I like pump gas cars - but that is all I have known - so who knows...maybe down the road.
n1das commented:
March 30, 2017, 6:01 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by vtknight View Post
I think these are fair points; you drive around 2-3 times the average amount of most people -and fuel is an issue. As to the TORQUE - there is no question that diesel torque is a very nice by-product of the continuously injected, high pressure fuel the car can be tuned with.
That said - diesel cars are not the only place you can find torque. As you stated it is a trade off for mpg - and for your situation, without modding/tuning the car, it is a very solid setup for you. I like pump gas cars - but that is all I have known - so who knows...maybe down the road.
It was literally like a change of religion for me years ago when I got my first diesel car (2002 VW Golf TDI) in 2002. I really took it on the chin for a year by being a serious friend of OPEC with my driving 1k miles/week in the Subaru WRX. Never again if I can help it. That caused me to do some research and look into practical alternatives. Now after 15 years and over 800k miles of experience driving diesel cars, I haven't regretted that decision one bit. Now I'm way too addicted to the diesel's TORQUE and efficiency to ever want to go back to gasoline again. I've looked at other technologies too. I've test driven a P85 Tesla Model S (Wow!) and been a passenger many times in a friend's Model S. I could have bought a Tesla Model S back when I ordered my 535d in 2013 but I opted for the diesel instead. Tesla makes interesting and amazing cars but I'm not ready to go all electric yet. Diesel still fits my particular use case better than anything else.

I'm interested in learning more about the 540d engine and hopefully a version of the 540d comes to the USA. It's probably a $100k car easily so that puts it out of my price range for a new one. Hopefully we'll see some pricing information soon. I'm keeping my F10 535d and E70 X5 35d but maybe later on....who knows.

madhotm3 commented:
March 30, 2017, 9:58 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by n1das View Post
5 fundamental reasons: Diesel offers a rich blend Economy, Longevity, Performance, TORQUE, and Efficiency. I can speak to all of these points in detail but that is beyond the scope of this thread. There are many more things involved than just saving money on fuel. I am hopelessly addicted to the diesel's weapon-grade TORQUE characteristics and the efficiency. I know what I like for a reason.

I drive a lot, around 1k miles per week, with more than 95% of those miles being highway miles. I also LIKE to drive, like most of us here. After logging a combined total of more than 800k miles in diesel vehicles over the past 15 years, I absolutely WILL NOT own another gasoline car ever again if I can help it. I haven't owned a gasoline car in over 10 years. I have never owned a gasoline BMW...and won't. I've driven gasser BMWs as loaner cars but I will never own any of them.



With my 1000 miles/week of haulin' ar$e on the highway, whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Gassers including hybrids are not an option at all. While there are several cheap gassers on the market that have the same or lower cost per mile compared to my diesel BMWs, they aren't cars I wan't to drive and none of them offer the kick of a turbo.

As someone who likes to drive and drive's a lot, I tend to gravitate toward a "driver's car" type of car and is one of the things that attracts me to BMW. Any gasoline "driver's car" usually comes with an unacceptable fuel economy hit for my driving 1k miles/week. Downsizing the car and/or the performance and driving a gasoline econobox (read: penalty box) to get the fuel economy is not an option. The mileage a Toyota Prius gets is laughable considering what a penalty box the car is to drive. I've owned my share of gasser econoboxes in my younger days and they've never been long term keepers because I always end up wanting out of them and into something else. They are not cars for me. I've also owned a Subaru WRX gasser back in 2001-2002 and it was a blast to drive. With my driving 1k mile/week, feeding the WRX (named "Rex") a full tank of premium gasoline every 2-2.5 days got old and expensive real fast.

With diesel I get to have my cake and eat it too. With my VW TDIs years ago, getting 45 MPGs while driving it like I stole it and having a 700 mile tank range was real nice. With my logging around 1k miles/week, diesel fits my particular use case better than anything else. Whatever I own and drive HAS to be diesel powered. Very soon after getting my first diesel car in 2002 (VW Golf TDI) and driving 1k miles/week, it wasn't long before realizing that owning anything that runs on gasoline no longer makes sense.

I plan to keep my F10 535d and E70 X5 35d but I'm curious about the 540d.

Have fun!


We are saying the same thing my man; I just tried to do it in less than 5000 words!
I'm with you ..same reasons why I have my 535d


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NickDi commented:
March 31, 2017, 8:13 pm

I love the diesel engine in my boat. Range is real important in the open ocean where there is no gas station.

I see how diesel makes sense if you drive 1,000 miles a week. However, many of us are driving short trips of less than 6 miles on average. The car does not even warm up enough to get to operating temp., you got stop and go traffic. And if you lease for 3 years like many of the people here, engine longevity does not matter.

For certain driving situations, commercial trucks, my boat - diesel makes a lot of sense. For the rest (and most) of the consumers - not so much. There must be a reason only 4% of the personal use cars in the US are diesel. Am I missing something or 96% of the people are not getting it?
madhotm3 commented:
March 31, 2017, 8:43 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDi View Post
I love the diesel engine in my boat. Range is real important in the open ocean where there is no gas station.

I see how diesel makes sense if you drive 1,000 miles a week. However, many of us are driving short trips of less than 6 miles on average. The car does not even warm up enough to get to operating temp., you got stop and go traffic. And if you lease for 3 years like many of the people here, engine longevity does not matter.

For certain driving situations, commercial trucks, my boat - diesel makes a lot of sense. For the rest (and most) of the consumers - not so much. There must be a reason only 4% of the personal use cars in the US are diesel. Am I missing something or 96% of the people are not getting it?


96% of people aren't getting it!


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Fore commented:
April 1, 2017, 4:10 pm

Car manufacturers haven't put much effort into promoting diesels, and they retain some of the bad reputation of their predecessors that spewed black soot. Sure, I could stop for gas every week, but with the diesel it is more like every other week. That convenience has value -- with just 26 fewer stops x 10-15 minutes, that's 5-6 hours a year I am not standing at a smelly pump. Now, let's see at a billing rate of ... Worth it to me!
ImolaRedM commented:
April 1, 2017, 5:08 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDi View Post
I love the diesel engine in my boat. Range is real important in the open ocean where there is no gas station.

I see how diesel makes sense if you drive 1,000 miles a week. However, many of us are driving short trips of less than 6 miles on average. The car does not even warm up enough to get to operating temp., you got stop and go traffic. And if you lease for 3 years like many of the people here, engine longevity does not matter.

For certain driving situations, commercial trucks, my boat - diesel makes a lot of sense. For the rest (and most) of the consumers - not so much. There must be a reason only 4% of the personal use cars in the US are diesel. Am I missing something or 96% of the people are not getting it?
I agree with some of what you said but you're equating marine and long haul Diesel engine design vs. automotive. The engines are designed to operate under a specific type of load. Operating it outside of that range will impact longevity. This is part of the problem with buying boats that have under used generators or 'get home' motors. Temperature is one factor but load is another. Diesels are better for highway driving than Hybrids. Short trips are not a Diesels strength. But put that engine under load even on short trips and long highway trips and it's hard to beat.

I like my F10 diesel for a daily driver. The torque is amazing and it's what matters most to me in daily driving. Plus I get to go 450-600 miles between visits to the gas station. I don't go easy on the skinny pedal so if I'm driving hard in the city during the winter I get about 450 miles to the tank. One road trips It's easy to get 600miles. About 500 miles per tank is my norm.

The full power in the gasoline V8 is hardly ever used but I'm willing to bet that torque is. Operating a gasoline engine without putting it under designed load is also damaging to the engine. I've owned BMW I6's and V8 gasoline engines. I much prefer the I6 but find the V8 torque intoxicating. In bigger cars like the 5, 7, and X5 I prefer the V8 altho the current I6 in the 540i is a very nice choice and one I would have gone with if not for the suspension on the M550i.

Debating the merits of a 540d is a bit premature since we don't really know what engine it will get in North America. I can say that one huge advantage over the M550i is that the 540d will weigh quite a bit less especially over the front axle. Off the line Diesels aren't the fastest, ever. The F10 535d (EU Spec 530d) is quite comparable to the G30 540i but still a bit slower. In the F10's, I equated the US Diesel engine offering as 4-cyl fuel consumption, 6-cyl performance, and V8 torque. The B57 could change that if we really get that monster.

As to why more people don't drive diesels? Who knows and frankly I don't care. More people drive Accords and Camry's and I don't understand why. I find that debate irrelevant. People buy what they need/like. It's a choice that I'm happy that we have. My wife doesn't care for Diesel cars because she's afraid of accidentally filling her tank with the wrong fuel. Is she wrong? I don't think so. It's her option to buy what she likes.

Diesel availability has never been a problem for me. It's an argument that really makes no sense but one that did worry me before I picked up my 535d. I've driven my 535d all over the Northwest and small rural towns or cities alike all had Diesel. The only time I had "problem" was with a small truck stop in the middle of no where that didn't have a filler nozzle that fit my tank. I had to drive across the street to the other station and filled up. Both stations had diesel and they weren't the only options in town. Just about every commercial truck and many RVs run on Diesel. The fuel is available without effort in looking even though some stations don't carry it.
Eagle11 commented:
April 2, 2017, 11:45 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDi View Post
I love the diesel engine in my boat. Range is real important in the open ocean where there is no gas station.

I see how diesel makes sense if you drive 1,000 miles a week. However, many of us are driving short trips of less than 6 miles on average. The car does not even warm up enough to get to operating temp., you got stop and go traffic. And if you lease for 3 years like many of the people here, engine longevity does not matter.

For certain driving situations, commercial trucks, my boat - diesel makes a lot of sense. For the rest (and most) of the consumers - not so much. There must be a reason only 4% of the personal use cars in the US are diesel. Am I missing something or 96% of the people are not getting it?
Most people lease cars and to pay extra for a diesel doesn't make much sense to people, now if manufacturers would price the diesel version of the car at or close to the base model then I think most people would get them. I find it interesting that BMW has priced the 530e as the same as the 530i.
BimmerBahn commented:
April 26, 2017, 7:26 pm

Sadly it looks like the 540d will be an EU 530d....output is 265 HP / 457 lb-ft. I'd give my right testicle for the quad-turbo M550d over here
tim330i commented:
April 26, 2017, 7:28 pm

I agree that we're not getting the quad turbo version of the B57 at this point as that is going into the M550d that we won't be seeing in the US. The B57 comes in three power/turbo configurations, how do you know that is the version we're getting?

Tim
Yinzer commented:
April 26, 2017, 8:05 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletbgm View Post
Sadly it looks like the 540d will be an EU 530d....output is 265 HP / 457 lb-ft. I'd give my right testicle for the quad-turbo M550d over here
+1 I'd give mine too.
alex md commented:
April 26, 2017, 8:18 pm

Without testicles you will not drive BMW may be Lexus at best


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MarkJK commented:
April 26, 2017, 8:32 pm

The engine specs discussed in this thread will be available in the M550d which has appeared in the press today:

http://blog.caranddriver.com/this-di...-as-a-bugatti/

I also saw a German outlet stating that it will be available as a sedan as well, but no word on whether we get it here in the US. I somewhat doubt it based on past experience.
gtobynj commented:
April 26, 2017, 8:38 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yinzer View Post
+1 I'd give mine too.


+2


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Haunsy commented:
April 26, 2017, 9:23 pm

+3


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BimmerBahn commented:
April 27, 2017, 12:36 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJK View Post
The engine specs discussed in this thread will be available in the M550d which has appeared in the press today:

http://blog.caranddriver.com/this-di...-as-a-bugatti/

I also saw a German outlet stating that it will be available as a sedan as well, but no word on whether we get it here in the US. I somewhat doubt it based on past experience.
Yeah, the prior gen M550d was available in saloon and touring... same with the new gen (G30/G31) from the recent announcement out of Munich. The NA market didnt get either the F10 M550d or the F15 X5 M50d...and the X5 is built here . Highly doubt we'll see either going forward.

Cheers,
Rhinozeroone commented:
April 27, 2017, 11:05 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haunsy View Post
+3


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Unless you have unusual anatomy, +2 is the most you can give.
dga commented:
April 27, 2017, 1:51 pm

Did I see that the G30 530d would have a power pack option from BMW that would increase output to ~290hp and torque into the m550i range i.e. 480-490 ft-lbs?

If this is true, it North American 540d could be quite special?!!!
Eagle11 commented:
April 27, 2017, 11:17 pm

Quote:
Originally Posted by tim330i View Post
I agree that we're not getting the quad turbo version of the B57 at this point as that is going into the M550d that we won't be seeing in the US. The B57 comes in three power/turbo configurations, how do you know that is the version we're getting?

Tim
ljwsandman commented:
April 28, 2017, 12:58 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex md View Post
Without testicles you will not drive BMW may be Lexus at best


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dga commented:
April 28, 2017, 3:46 pm

http://driving.ca/bmw/5-series/auto-...-north-america
Sd575 commented:
May 6, 2017, 6:35 am

The 540d described in the original post would be my dream car (400+ HP, 500+Lbft). Although, I suspect the 530d is what we will see in the USA which will only be slightly upgraded from the past USA model 535d. That is around 260hp and 400+Lbft. The spec in the OP sound like European specs. But we can certainly hope that it might come to the USA. I have a 2016 528i. Almost bought a 535d but the ones available at the time were $15k more expensive (due to options packages) and I chose the less expensive option. I love the way the diesel drives. Feels heavier, much smoother power delivery, has more power to the pavement than you will ever need. I can tell you that if the 540d described in the OP actually comes to the USA, I will buy one in an instant!!! Oh, please, please, please BMW.
MarkJK commented:
May 6, 2017, 7:52 am

If the M550d indeed were to make it to the US it would be an 80K+ car. The market for that I am sure is tiny, that's probably why we won't see it.
Eagle11 commented:
May 7, 2017, 2:16 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJK View Post
If the M550d indeed were to make it to the US it would be an 80K+ car. The market for that I am sure is tiny, that's probably why we won't see it.
However, that engine could be fitted in another vehicles, like a 750ld, X5, the X7 if it gets built. Having been driven in a 750ld with that engine I can tell you that the 750 was a beast, and the speed was increditable.
Anonimac commented:
June 15, 2017, 10:08 am

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...79&postcount=4