Must have tools for diys - Bimmerfest - BMW Forums



Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 3 Series & 4 Series > E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)

E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)
The E9X is the 4th evolution of the BMW 3 series including a highly tuned twin turbo 335i variant pushing out 300hp and 300 ft. lbs. of torque. BMW continues to show that it sets the bar for true driving performance! -- View the E9X Wiki

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-28-2020, 11:00 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
What're the must have tools for a diy? I brought my bmw over a year ago. I am going to try to do majority of the maintenance and repair myself. I do have the basic like a low profile Jack with jack stands a scanner and a Craftsman Mechenics tool box set.. But what're some must have tools to work on my BMW at home?

Last edited by moosaud1998; 06-28-2020 at 11:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:08 AM
CALWATERBOY TRE's Avatar
CALWATERBOY TRE CALWATERBOY TRE is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fog City, CA
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1,882
Mein Auto: E93 335i, somewhat mod
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
What're the must have tools for a diy? I brought my bmw over a year ago. I am going to try to do majority of the maintenance and repair myself. I do have the basic like a low profile Jack with jack stands a scanner and a Craftsman Mechenics tool box set.. But what're some must have tools to work on my BMW at home?







Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:14 AM
CALWATERBOY TRE's Avatar
CALWATERBOY TRE CALWATERBOY TRE is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fog City, CA
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1,882
Mein Auto: E93 335i, somewhat mod






Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:18 AM
CALWATERBOY TRE's Avatar
CALWATERBOY TRE CALWATERBOY TRE is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fog City, CA
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1,882
Mein Auto: E93 335i, somewhat mod








Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:22 AM
CALWATERBOY TRE's Avatar
CALWATERBOY TRE CALWATERBOY TRE is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fog City, CA
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1,882
Mein Auto: E93 335i, somewhat mod
.

You'll discover:
  • Your garage isn't large enough
  • That Costco double chest tool box on wheels will be full and then some
  • There is no end of useful things to buy
  • Wife will accuse you of being like air - you take up all available space


Name:  Mechanic 01 [20].jpg
Views: 91
Size:  9.8 KB
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:26 AM
CALWATERBOY TRE's Avatar
CALWATERBOY TRE CALWATERBOY TRE is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fog City, CA
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1,882
Mein Auto: E93 335i, somewhat mod


Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-29-2020, 07:52 AM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by CALWATERBOY TRE View Post
.

You'll discover:
  • Your garage isn't large enough
  • That Costco double chest tool box on wheels will be full and then some
  • There is no end of useful things to buy
  • Wife will accuse you of being like air - you take up all available space


Attachment 898663
Wife will accuse you of being like air - you take up all available space
. Ahhh I'm 22. So no wife no worries
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-29-2020, 09:58 AM
deroy deroy is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Netherlands, Europe
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 967
Mein Auto: X5 e70 4.8
However much you buy, for every job you need (or want) something new. Like a ring wrench that is deeper or shorter than all alternatives you have already. A special tool. A big 36mm 12 point socket. A larger catch pan (for coolant). Etc.


Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-29-2020, 10:20 AM
2NASpec's Avatar
2NASpec 2NASpec is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Pacific NW
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 485
Mein Auto: 2012 328i E92
It's really hard to say what you will need as it will vary depending on the job. My Dad was the one who taught me how to work on cars when I was 8. I remember only having very basic tools back then as we were only doing fluid changes and such on the 2 Hondas that we owned. Back then I started out with a 3/8in ratchet, some sockets, 3 in and 6 in extension, various screwdrivers, a wrench set that only went up to 17mm, a jack and jack stands and that's it.
However, as my interest in cars grew, I started working on my relatives cars, then my own car as well as my friend's cars when we were old enough to drive. Pretty soon, I was working on customers cars in auto school.
Throughout the years, my own personal collection of tools grew and what I consider essential now, I did not consider essential when I first started working on cars. Why? Well because I did not incur a job that called for it back then. You will find out pretty soon that no matter what tools you may own right now, you will need to buy a few more to get the job done down the road.

Since you said you have a basic tool kit, I would recommend you get the following to if your tool kit does not come with them. I will assume your toolkit comes with basic ratchets, wrenches, and sockets.
Universal Joints or swivel socket set if it's within your budget
Various extensions for your ratchet
1/2 in breaker bar
Flex head ratchet or flex head ratcheting wrench set if it's within your budget
E-Torx sockets
Torx bit sockets
Fluid pump for tranny, diff, etc..
86.4mm 16 Flute oil filter wrench
1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 in torque wrenches
Magnetic pick up tool - This will be used a lot
A good work light or two

These are just some of the things I would consider essential off the top of my head. I'm sure I missed a few and the others would chime in to fill them. Later on if you have the money to spend, a 1/2in impact gun and a small 1/4in impact wrench can help speed up repairs quite a bit. Remember to only use impact rated sockets with impact tools.
__________________
Alpine White
Premium pkg
BPC Stage 1 Tune

Last edited by 2NASpec; 06-29-2020 at 10:32 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-29-2020, 12:14 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2NASpec View Post
It's really hard to say what you will need as it will vary depending on the job. My Dad was the one who taught me how to work on cars when I was 8. I remember only having very basic tools back then as we were only doing fluid changes and such on the 2 Hondas that we owned. Back then I started out with a 3/8in ratchet, some sockets, 3 in and 6 in extension, various screwdrivers, a wrench set that only went up to 17mm, a jack and jack stands and that's it.
However, as my interest in cars grew, I started working on my relatives cars, then my own car as well as my friend's cars when we were old enough to drive. Pretty soon, I was working on customers cars in auto school.
Throughout the years, my own personal collection of tools grew and what I consider essential now, I did not consider essential when I first started working on cars. Why? Well because I did not incur a job that called for it back then. You will find out pretty soon that no matter what tools you may own right now, you will need to buy a few more to get the job done down the road.

Since you said you have a basic tool kit, I would recommend you get the following to if your tool kit does not come with them. I will assume your toolkit comes with basic ratchets, wrenches, and sockets.
Universal Joints or swivel socket set if it's within your budget
Various extensions for your ratchet
1/2 in breaker bar
Flex head ratchet or flex head ratcheting wrench set if it's within your budget
E-Torx sockets
Torx bit sockets
Fluid pump for tranny, diff, etc..
86.4mm 16 Flute oil filter wrench
1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 in torque wrenches
Magnetic pick up tool - This will be used a lot
A good work light or two

These are just some of the things I would consider essential off the top of my head. I'm sure I missed a few and the others would chime in to fill them. Later on if you have the money to spend, a 1/2in impact gun and a small 1/4in impact wrench can help speed up repairs quite a bit. Remember to only use impact rated sockets with impact tools.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004XD0Z6O Would this be too many?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-29-2020, 01:06 PM
gbalthrop gbalthrop is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,668
Mein Auto: 2007 328xi E91
Tool Strategy

Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
What're the must have tools for a diy? I brought my bmw over a year ago. I am going to try to do majority of the maintenance and repair myself. I do have the basic like a low profile Jack with jack stands a scanner and a Craftsman Mechenics tool box set.. But what're some must have tools to work on my BMW at home?...
[/B]. Ahhh I'm 22. So no wife no worries
At 22, you are likely to move a number of times in your life, and space, garage, tool storage, transportability, etc. MAY all be factors either NOW or in the future. So what works for "Boomers" with a 2+ car garage, plenty of storage space, and relatively unlimited funds may NOT be what is best for YOU.

Since "Status" (He who dies with the most toys WINS ;-) is BIGLY among many BimmerOwners, I'll be the first to admit: I'm CHEAP, a veritable "Bottom-Fisherman", and I rarely buy tools anywhere other than HFT or Amazon. UNLESS you work all day, every day, using those tools, it is better to have as many VERSATILE tools as possible, and that means buying a LOT of cheap tools rather than a FEW Expensive Tools. If you have limited space, NOW or in the future will live in a townhouse, condo or apt. with NO garage, and possibly no electrical outlet, and/or will have to relocate your tools multiple times in the next 5 or 10 years, plan accordingly.

I have maintained my own cars (doing everything but AT rebuild and tire mounting) for 60 years in all sorts of different locations, from my parents house, College, Law School, Apt, Townhouse, SFD with single garage, double garage, 5-acre horse property with barn, etc. and have built up tools progressively over that time. I stayed with vintage (OLD ;-) Jags (still have XJ-S V-12) for years until buying E91 3+ years ago, so am late to E-sockets, and INPA, but BOTH of those are BASICS. Torx bits too if you don't already have them.

Planning ahead and being realistic about what makes sense NOW & in near term is particularly important at your age. For instance, if you're computer-savvy, start an Access Database (or at least Excel Workbook) in which you maintain records of (1) Maintenance Done/to Do; (2) Maintenance Procedures followed (you won't remember the details when you do the job again in 6 months or 6 years ;-); (3) Tool Locations & Evaluations/ Wish List (a place for everything & everything in its place); (4) Supply Inventory/ Evaluation/ Wish List. As you get older and accumulate MORE TOYS, you may find THINGS OWN YOU if you don't keep them realistically organized or limited. At 22, EVERYTHING "appears" possible. You're a LOOONG way from "Down-sizing", but it's NEVER too early to think "Long-term".

So until you have your own garage that you are likely to continue to own for 10+ years, I would avoid Air Tools and Large Tool Chests, and build up a group of "portable" tools you can carry to a buddy's place to help him, work in a driveway or parking lot, etc. without electrical power. Here's my suggested list with THOSE considerations in mind:

0) MOST IMPORTANT: Diagnosing a fault so that you FIX the issue, without unnecessary time & expense in replacing parts that are still functional requires (A) Knowledge of the system you are diagnosing/ "fixing"; (B) Proper test equipment; (C) the ability to convey test results to Forums & get suggestions from those who understand/ have dealt with that system. That means you need a Multimeter, to understand how to use TIS Online Manual, and PREFERABLY BMW Diagnostic Software (INPA/ISTA):
https://www.harborfreight.com/7-func...ter-63759.html
https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/
https://www.bimmergeeks.net/
If you don't have a Windows Laptop, you can get a VERY functional 15.6" Screen unit from Lenovo for ~ $300, and THAT, with BMW Standard Tools loaded is the BEST tool you can have in your bag, for viewing and saving information on ANY subject, automotive or otherwise.

1) Primary Tool Sources: Harbor Freight Tools; Amazon

2) Portable Tool Storage: Plastic Toolboxes & Portable ToolChest:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=portable+...ref=nb_sb_noss
https://www.harborfreight.com/search...20tool%20boxes

3) Socket Sets: 1/4", 3/8" & 1/2" Drive: presumably you already have those. If NOT, how & where you will store & FIND the proper tool is as important as the tool itself so plan ahead.

4) Torx bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=torx+bit+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

5) E-sockets:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=e-socket+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

6) Hex bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=hex+bit+s...nb_sb_ss_i_1_6

7) T-60 Bit for Belt Tensioner:
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Drive-...s%2C217&sr=1-2

8) Breaker Bar, 3/8" (OR just use Torque Wrench & Adapter):
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=3%2F8+bre...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

9) Brake Caliper Piston Compressor:
https://www.amazon.com/Capri-Tools-2...s%2C149&sr=1-3

10) Torque Wrenches, 1/4" Drive Inch-Pound & 1/2" Drive Foot-Pound:
https://www.harborfreight.com/14-in-...nch-63881.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F4+tor...b_sb_ss_i_2_10
https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-...nch-63882.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F2+tor...f=nb_sb_noss_1

Always plan ahead by reviewing Procedure for any future job in TIS & Bentley, and make sure you have the tools you need days in advance of doing job. Getting tips from Forum members in advance is also a plus.

BTW, 2NASpec reminded me:

a) Oil filter wrench (HU816 Filter is ~ $7.50, so that's ~ $5.50 for wrench):
https://www.amazon.com/Ibetter-Metal...3461601&sr=8-3

b) USB rechargeable Li-Ion work light (get 2 ;-):
https://www.amazon.com/Lmaytech-Rech...NsaWNrPXRydWU=

George

Last edited by gbalthrop; 06-29-2020 at 01:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-29-2020, 01:23 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbalthrop View Post
At 22, you are likely to move a number of times in your life, and space, garage, tool storage, transportability, etc. MAY all be factors either NOW or in the future. So what works for "Boomers" with a 2+ car garage, plenty of storage space, and relatively unlimited funds may NOT be what is best for YOU.

Since "Status" (He who dies with the most toys WINS ;-) is BIGLY among many BimmerOwners, I'll be the first to admit: I'm CHEAP, a veritable "Bottom-Fisherman", and I rarely buy tools anywhere other than HFT or Amazon. UNLESS you work all day, every day, using those tools, it is better to have as many VERSATILE tools as possible, and that means buying a LOT of cheap tools rather than a FEW Expensive Tools. If you have limited space, NOW or in the future will live in a townhouse, condo or apt. with NO garage, and possibly no electrical outlet, and/or will have to relocate your tools multiple times in the next 5 or 10 years, plan accordingly.

I have maintained my own cars (doing everything but AT rebuild and tire mounting) for 60 years in all sorts of different locations, from my parents house, College, Law School, Apt, Townhouse, SFD with single garage, double garage, 5-acre horse property with barn, etc. and have built up tools progressively over that time. I stayed with vintage (OLD ;-) Jags (still have XJ-S V-12) for years until buying E91 3+ years ago, so am late to E-sockets, and INPA, but BOTH of those are BASICS. Torx bits too if you don't already have them.

Planning ahead and being realistic about what makes sense NOW & in near term is particularly important at your age. For instance, if you're computer-savvy, start an Access Database (or at least Excel Workbook) in which you maintain records of (1) Maintenance Done/to Do; (2) Maintenance Procedures followed (you won't remember the details when you do the job again in 6 months or 6 years ;-); (3) Tool Locations & Evaluations/ Wish List (a place for everything & everything in its place); (4) Supply Inventory/ Evaluation/ Wish List. As you get older and accumulate MORE TOYS, you may find THINGS OWN YOU if you don't keep them realistically organized or limited. At 22, EVERYTHING "appears" possible. You're a LOOONG way from "Down-sizing", but it's NEVER too early to think "Long-term".

So until you have your own garage that you are likely to continue to own for 10+ years, I would avoid Air Tools and Large Tool Chests, and build up a group of "portable" tools you can carry to a buddy's place to help him, work in a driveway or parking lot, etc. without electrical power. Here's my suggested list with THOSE considerations in mind:

0) MOST IMPORTANT: Diagnosing a fault so that you FIX the issue, without unnecessary time & expense in replacing parts that are still functional requires (A) Knowledge of the system you are diagnosing/ "fixing"; (B) Proper test equipment; (C) the ability to convey test results to Forums & get suggestions from those who understand/ have dealt with that system. That means you need a Multimeter, to understand how to use TIS Online Manual, and PREFERABLY BMW Diagnostic Software (INPA/ISTA):
https://www.harborfreight.com/7-func...ter-63759.html
https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/
https://www.bimmergeeks.net/
If you don't have a Windows Laptop, you can get a VERY functional 15.6" Screen unit from Lenovo for ~ $300, and THAT, with BMW Standard Tools loaded is the BEST tool you can have in your bag, for viewing and saving information on ANY subject, automotive or otherwise.

1) Primary Tool Sources: Harbor Freight Tools; Amazon

2) Portable Tool Storage: Plastic Toolboxes & Portable ToolChest:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=portable+...ref=nb_sb_noss
https://www.harborfreight.com/search...20tool%20boxes

3) Socket Sets: 1/4", 3/8" & 1/2" Drive: presumably you already have those. If NOT, how & where you will store & FIND the proper tool is as important as the tool itself so plan ahead.

4) Torx bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=torx+bit+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

5) E-sockets:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=e-socket+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

6) Hex bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=hex+bit+s...nb_sb_ss_i_1_6

7) T-60 Bit for Belt Tensioner:
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Drive-...s%2C217&sr=1-2

8) Breaker Bar, 3/8" (OR just use Torque Wrench & Adapter):
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=3%2F8+bre...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

9) Brake Caliper Piston Compressor:
https://www.amazon.com/Capri-Tools-2...s%2C149&sr=1-3

10) Torque Wrenches, 1/4" Drive Inch-Pound & 1/2" Drive Foot-Pound:
https://www.harborfreight.com/14-in-...nch-63881.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F4+tor...b_sb_ss_i_2_10
https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-...nch-63882.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F2+tor...f=nb_sb_noss_1

Always plan ahead by reviewing Procedure for any future job in TIS & Bentley, and make sure you have the tools you need days in advance of doing job. Getting tips from Forum members in advance is also a plus.

George

Awesome write up. I appreciate the time and effort you took to write this out for me. But, for the breaker bar, will I only need a 3/8'' or both 3/8'' and 1/2''? I'd rather get one that is frequently used. What about the length of the breaker bar?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-29-2020, 01:31 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbalthrop View Post
At 22, you are likely to move a number of times in your life, and space, garage, tool storage, transportability, etc. MAY all be factors either NOW or in the future. So what works for "Boomers" with a 2+ car garage, plenty of storage space, and relatively unlimited funds may NOT be what is best for YOU.

Since "Status" (He who dies with the most toys WINS ;-) is BIGLY among many BimmerOwners, I'll be the first to admit: I'm CHEAP, a veritable "Bottom-Fisherman", and I rarely buy tools anywhere other than HFT or Amazon. UNLESS you work all day, every day, using those tools, it is better to have as many VERSATILE tools as possible, and that means buying a LOT of cheap tools rather than a FEW Expensive Tools. If you have limited space, NOW or in the future will live in a townhouse, condo or apt. with NO garage, and possibly no electrical outlet, and/or will have to relocate your tools multiple times in the next 5 or 10 years, plan accordingly.

I have maintained my own cars (doing everything but AT rebuild and tire mounting) for 60 years in all sorts of different locations, from my parents house, College, Law School, Apt, Townhouse, SFD with single garage, double garage, 5-acre horse property with barn, etc. and have built up tools progressively over that time. I stayed with vintage (OLD ;-) Jags (still have XJ-S V-12) for years until buying E91 3+ years ago, so am late to E-sockets, and INPA, but BOTH of those are BASICS. Torx bits too if you don't already have them.

Planning ahead and being realistic about what makes sense NOW & in near term is particularly important at your age. For instance, if you're computer-savvy, start an Access Database (or at least Excel Workbook) in which you maintain records of (1) Maintenance Done/to Do; (2) Maintenance Procedures followed (you won't remember the details when you do the job again in 6 months or 6 years ;-); (3) Tool Locations & Evaluations/ Wish List (a place for everything & everything in its place); (4) Supply Inventory/ Evaluation/ Wish List. As you get older and accumulate MORE TOYS, you may find THINGS OWN YOU if you don't keep them realistically organized or limited. At 22, EVERYTHING "appears" possible. You're a LOOONG way from "Down-sizing", but it's NEVER too early to think "Long-term".

So until you have your own garage that you are likely to continue to own for 10+ years, I would avoid Air Tools and Large Tool Chests, and build up a group of "portable" tools you can carry to a buddy's place to help him, work in a driveway or parking lot, etc. without electrical power. Here's my suggested list with THOSE considerations in mind:

0) MOST IMPORTANT: Diagnosing a fault so that you FIX the issue, without unnecessary time & expense in replacing parts that are still functional requires (A) Knowledge of the system you are diagnosing/ "fixing"; (B) Proper test equipment; (C) the ability to convey test results to Forums & get suggestions from those who understand/ have dealt with that system. That means you need a Multimeter, to understand how to use TIS Online Manual, and PREFERABLY BMW Diagnostic Software (INPA/ISTA):
https://www.harborfreight.com/7-func...ter-63759.html
https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/
https://www.bimmergeeks.net/
If you don't have a Windows Laptop, you can get a VERY functional 15.6" Screen unit from Lenovo for ~ $300, and THAT, with BMW Standard Tools loaded is the BEST tool you can have in your bag, for viewing and saving information on ANY subject, automotive or otherwise.

1) Primary Tool Sources: Harbor Freight Tools; Amazon

2) Portable Tool Storage: Plastic Toolboxes & Portable ToolChest:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=portable+...ref=nb_sb_noss
https://www.harborfreight.com/search...20tool%20boxes

3) Socket Sets: 1/4", 3/8" & 1/2" Drive: presumably you already have those. If NOT, how & where you will store & FIND the proper tool is as important as the tool itself so plan ahead.

4) Torx bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=torx+bit+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

5) E-sockets:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=e-socket+...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

6) Hex bits:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=hex+bit+s...nb_sb_ss_i_1_6

7) T-60 Bit for Belt Tensioner:
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Drive-...s%2C217&sr=1-2

8) Breaker Bar, 3/8" (OR just use Torque Wrench & Adapter):
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=3%2F8+bre...nb_sb_ss_i_1_8

9) Brake Caliper Piston Compressor:
https://www.amazon.com/Capri-Tools-2...s%2C149&sr=1-3

10) Torque Wrenches, 1/4" Drive Inch-Pound & 1/2" Drive Foot-Pound:
https://www.harborfreight.com/14-in-...nch-63881.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F4+tor...b_sb_ss_i_2_10
https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-...nch-63882.html
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=1%2F2+tor...f=nb_sb_noss_1

Always plan ahead by reviewing Procedure for any future job in TIS & Bentley, and make sure you have the tools you need days in advance of doing job. Getting tips from Forum members in advance is also a plus.

BTW, 2NASpec reminded me:

a) Oil filter wrench (HU816 Filter is ~ $7.50, so that's ~ $5.50 for wrench):
https://www.amazon.com/Ibetter-Metal...3461601&sr=8-3

b) USB rechargeable Li-Ion work light (get 2 ;-):
https://www.amazon.com/Lmaytech-Rech...NsaWNrPXRydWU=

George

How does this look?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1.png
Views:	10
Size:	120.1 KB
ID:	898687   Click image for larger version

Name:	2.png
Views:	10
Size:	76.3 KB
ID:	898689  
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-29-2020, 01:40 PM
gbalthrop gbalthrop is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,668
Mein Auto: 2007 328xi E91
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
Awesome write up. I appreciate the time and effort you took to write this out for me. But, for the breaker bar, will I only need a 3/8'' or both 3/8'' and 1/2''? I'd rather get one that is frequently used. What about the length of the breaker bar?
Selfish benefit as well: Taking the opportunity to review what is NOW available as stock & prices change constantly. As far as breaker bar, if you are going to either hit it with a hammer to apply "impact", or work on suspension or something requiring > ~50 Ft. lb., I would get a 1/2" drive bar ~ 18" long. As stated, you can always use an adapter if your bit is 3/8 drive. Just be aware of the T-60 bit required to change/remove Serpentine Belt, and most "kits" stop @ T-50 or T-55.

There is a slight gap between the 200 inch-pound Clicker Wrench and the 150 Ft-Lb Clicker Torque wrench, but I have never had an issue with that. Where proper torque is MOST critical is actually in the Inch-pound range, such as in spark plug torque.

Glad to see you have attention to details. So many folks these days only operate in "Get 'er DONE" mode, and don't plan ahead. If you REALLY like to understand how things work and pay attention to DETAILS, TIS wiring diagrams & INPA Diagnostics are what "Engineer" types use to do that.

Please educate the rest of us as you learn about the various BMW E9x Systems,
George
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-29-2020, 01:51 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbalthrop View Post
Selfish benefit as well: Taking the opportunity to review what is NOW available as stock & prices change constantly. As far as breaker bar, if you are going to either hit it with a hammer to apply "impact", or work on suspension or something requiring > ~50 Ft. lb., I would get a 1/2" drive bar ~ 18" long. As stated, you can always use an adapter if your bit is 3/8 drive. Just be aware of the T-60 bit required to change/remove Serpentine Belt, and most "kits" stop @ T-50 or T-55.

There is a slight gap between the 200 inch-pound Clicker Wrench and the 150 Ft-Lb Clicker Torque wrench, but I have never had an issue with that. Where proper torque is MOST critical is actually in the Inch-pound range, such as in spark plug torque.

Glad to see you have attention to details. So many folks these days only operate in "Get 'er DONE" mode, and don't plan ahead. If you REALLY like to understand how things work and pay attention to DETAILS, TIS wiring diagrams & INPA Diagnostics are what "Engineer" types use to do that.

Please educate the rest of us as you learn about the various BMW E9x Systems,
George
INPA Diagnostics I should've brought the Bimmer Geeks tool/Cable. But, a month ago or so my cooling fan kicked on high and I didn't have a OBD scanner or anything so I ordered the Autophix OBD scanner off amazon. Now I can't return it. Feels like a waste of $127.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-29-2020, 02:06 PM
gbalthrop gbalthrop is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,668
Mein Auto: 2007 328xi E91
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
How does this look?
Those all look good to me, and I have most of those exact items, NONE of which have broken or had any defects, so why pay more?

Here is a "Poor Man's", transportable, impact wrench and choices for impact sockets. As you hopefully know, tapping a breaker bar with a hammer (which is similar to what an Impact Wrench does) is better for breaking a stuck fastener loose than a "Dead Pull" on a Long Handle. I have an "Ancient" Slide-type breaker bar, similar to the one shown in the link below, that I hit lightly (NOT "Slug" ;-) with a hand sledge to loosen rusted/corroded nuts. It is actually BETTER, in that you can use more finesse, than my compressed-air-powered "Earthquake" ~ 450 ft.-lb. impact wrench.
https://www.amazon.com/Sliding-Wrenc...%2C183&sr=8-39
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=impact+so...f=nb_sb_noss_1

When it comes to tools, "knowing when to quit" is the hard part. Best NOT to buy something in a "flash sale" unless you have already thought about, slept on it, and decided to buy it when the price drops.

Examples of same:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=wobble+dr...b_sb_ss_i_5_12
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=socket+ad...f=nb_sb_noss_2

Does the Concept of a Database make more sense NOW?

George
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-29-2020, 02:11 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbalthrop View Post
Those all look good to me, and I have most of those exact items, NONE of which have broken or had any defects, so why pay more?

Here is a "Poor Man's", transportable, impact wrench and choices for impact sockets. As you hopefully know, tapping a breaker bar with a hammer (which is similar to what an Impact Wrench does) is better for breaking a stuck fastener loose than a "Dead Pull" on a Long Handle. I have an "Ancient" Slide-type breaker bar, similar to the one shown in the link below, that I hit lightly (NOT "Slug" ;-) with a hand sledge to loosen rusted/corroded nuts. It is actually BETTER, in that you can use more finesse, than my compressed-air-powered "Earthquake" ~ 450 ft.-lb. impact wrench.
https://www.amazon.com/Sliding-Wrenc...%2C183&sr=8-39
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=impact+so...f=nb_sb_noss_1

When it comes to tools, "knowing when to quit" is the hard part. Best NOT to buy something in a "flash sale" unless you have already thought about, slept on it, and decided to buy it when the price drops.

Examples of same:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=wobble+dr...b_sb_ss_i_5_12
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=socket+ad...f=nb_sb_noss_2

Does the Concept of a Database make more sense NOW?

George
Yes sir. Makes much better sense now. Look like I'll go ahead and order the stuff on Harbor freights before the sale ends tomorrow.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-29-2020, 02:25 PM
gbalthrop gbalthrop is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,668
Mein Auto: 2007 328xi E91
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
INPA Diagnostics I should've brought the Bimmer Geeks tool/Cable. But, a month ago or so my cooling fan kicked on high and I didn't have a OBD scanner or anything so I ordered the Autophix OBD scanner off amazon. Now I can't return it. Feels like a waste of $127.
While INPA is the BEST Diagnostic Tool I know of, the AutoPhix is probably good for more quickly learning how to get fault codes, fault Definitions, and SOME Parameters or Module INPUTS in Real Time. While INPA is great for DETAILS, its learning curve is such that only a masochist like me would take the time to save ALL the screens for each Module, translate the German into English using Google Translate, and save those screens by Module so I know what diagnostics it is actually capable of. AND even then, unless you ALSO take the time to learn how to use TIS wiring diagrams to see what components/ sensors, etc. are connected to which Module, and understand the CONCEPTS of how systems work, INPA can be more confusing than helpful.

So even if you have the time and desire to learn how to use INPA or ISTA, AutoPhix is a good stepping stone to learn the basic concepts what information is available in a particular Module. While $45 for a K+DCAN Cable & Free Downloads are appealing, the learning curve & time invested mean you should learn those programs a step-at-a-time. I bought a cheap Autel 319 to diagnose a misfire issue a week after I got my 328xi, and only started messing with INPA about a year later. The Autel has come in handy diagnosing half-a-dozen NON-BMW's for friends, so every tool has its purpose, and NO Tool is right for EVERYONE & Everything.

Here endeth the Sermon.
George
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-29-2020, 04:21 PM
2NASpec's Avatar
2NASpec 2NASpec is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Pacific NW
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 485
Mein Auto: 2012 328i E92
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosaud1998 View Post
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004XD0Z6O Would this be too many?
Nope. It's a good set to have.
__________________
Alpine White
Premium pkg
BPC Stage 1 Tune
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-30-2020, 11:56 AM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbalthrop View Post
While INPA is the BEST Diagnostic Tool I know of, the AutoPhix is probably good for more quickly learning how to get fault codes, fault Definitions, and SOME Parameters or Module INPUTS in Real Time. While INPA is great for DETAILS, its learning curve is such that only a masochist like me would take the time to save ALL the screens for each Module, translate the German into English using Google Translate, and save those screens by Module so I know what diagnostics it is actually capable of. AND even then, unless you ALSO take the time to learn how to use TIS wiring diagrams to see what components/ sensors, etc. are connected to which Module, and understand the CONCEPTS of how systems work, INPA can be more confusing than helpful.

So even if you have the time and desire to learn how to use INPA or ISTA, AutoPhix is a good stepping stone to learn the basic concepts what information is available in a particular Module. While $45 for a K+DCAN Cable & Free Downloads are appealing, the learning curve & time invested mean you should learn those programs a step-at-a-time. I bought a cheap Autel 319 to diagnose a misfire issue a week after I got my 328xi, and only started messing with INPA about a year later. The Autel has come in handy diagnosing half-a-dozen NON-BMW's for friends, so every tool has its purpose, and NO Tool is right for EVERYONE & Everything.

Here endeth the Sermon.
George
Now that I think about it, I really don't think a 1/4 torque wrench would come in use more then a 3/8 torque wrench would.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-30-2020, 02:28 PM
dukedkt442's Avatar
dukedkt442 dukedkt442 is offline
Anti-Hack
Location: Hudson Valley/LI, NY; Treasure Coast, FL; OBX, NC.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 4,448
Mein Auto: 2008 BMW X3
A welder, angle grinder, cut off wheel, media blaster, various drills and impacts, 20 ton press, various hoists, noid lights, pullers, etc. As for tool box tools, thereís not many that I donít have. Ratchets, breaker bars and torque wrenches in 4-5 drive sizes up to 1Ē on a bar. Many have multiples, depending on which shop Iím working in. If I find Iím working on a car and need a tool I donít have, Iíll buy it.


Sent from my iPhone using Bimmerfest
__________________


The "need to have my head examined " E21 build thread

2008 BMW E83 1981 BMW 320i
2016 Chevy Silverado 2011 VW Jetta
1984 GMC S-15 1986 Oldsmobile 442
Another half dozen '60s tractors
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 06-30-2020, 05:25 PM
11e90Ride 11e90Ride is offline
Registered User
Location: Vermont
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 36
Mein Auto: '11 328i
I have had a pretty decent spread of tools for long time. pretty much all sockets in 1/4, 3/8 & 1/2" drive sizes, shallow and deep, 6 and 12-point, extension, swivels, allen, etc...mostly metric stuff. combo metric wrenches. allen wrenches & sockets. torx sockets.
Mostly Craftsman before it was made overseas, but some SK stuff, and bit of blackhawk.

I recently did oil pan gasket, oil filter housing gasket, and strut/shock replacement onthe E90 inside of 3 weeks:

gotta have tools:

external torx sockets. I don't yet have, but in hindsite would grab the VIM tools swivel-head 1/4" drive socket set. UJET400 i think. I had some blackhawk and proto etorx sockets which got the job done, but that 1/4" drive swivel setup would have been a timesaver, particularly on the OFH...the bolt under the intake manifold.

stanley/proto makes a 12-piece swivel-head, spline-drive ratcheting wrench set (JSCVMF-12S) which was awesome to have. Spline works slick on e-torx bolts and hex-head stuff. The 8mm spline was clutch on the lower OFH etorx bolt.

shallow torx sockets in 1/4" drive. I had some..not sure what brand, but the hard coolant line attached to the front subframe needs a shallow torx arrangement. That needs removal for oil pan gasket replacement.

next on my list, which i do not have yet is a pass-through ratchet/socket set. 21mm for tie rod end. 13/16" / 7/8" for oem / bilstein front strut top nut. also top nut on the rear shock would benefit, forget the size. 13 - 16mm-ish. I used spark plug socket for the front strut and struggled with standard box wrench on the rear shocks. 21mm box end on the tie rod.

Love an excuse for new tools. Faced with $2500-ish in labor for the recent work, spending a few hundred on some new tools seems like a legit spend

The oil leaks vanished and Bilstein B8s with oem sport springs are fantastic.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-30-2020, 07:16 PM
moosaud1998's Avatar
moosaud1998 moosaud1998 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicago, IL
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 226
Mein Auto: 2009 BMW 328XI
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukedkt442 View Post
A welder, angle grinder, cut off wheel, media blaster, various drills and impacts, 20 ton press, various hoists, noid lights, pullers, etc. As for tool box tools, thereís not many that I donít have. Ratchets, breaker bars and torque wrenches in 4-5 drive sizes up to 1Ē on a bar. Many have multiples, depending on which shop Iím working in. If I find Iím working on a car and need a tool I donít have, Iíll buy it.


Sent from my iPhone using Bimmerfest
Just out if curiosity, do you have 1 pair of jack stands or 2 pairs?
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-30-2020, 09:45 PM
jiveturky1 jiveturky1 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Denver
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 711
Mein Auto: 09 335xi 6MT, 05 M3 6MT
Torx, esp for some interior trim that starts to rattle around the instrument cluster.

Also get the socket for the oil filter cap. It's not going to cooperate by hand
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07-01-2020, 03:54 AM
Watchme Watchme is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: MA
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,150
Mein Auto: 2011 328i E90
I feel like some basic tools are obvious and a very good response sum from others (torque wrenches, sockets, etc.)
To me, some game-changers were:
Jack: https://www.harborfreight.com/3-ton-...ack-63183.html
Stands: https://www.amazon.com/ESCO-10498-Ja...3599491&sr=8-3 (these used to be cheaper!)
Impact: https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-2...99M1/206387892 (this used to be cheaper, too).
Ramps: https://www.amazon.com/Race-Ramps-RR...600752&sr=8-11
__________________
2011 328i X-Drive Sedan N51 AT; Black / Black.
Premium, Value, Hi-Fi stereo, etc.
Reply With Quote
Reply

See More Related BMW Stories


Forum Navigation
Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 3 Series & 4 Series > E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)
Today's Posts Search
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
© 2001- VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.