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Old 10-02-2017, 10:32 PM
Belway Belway is offline
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Thinking of buying a X5 35d

Thinking of buying a 2013 x5 35d with 60000 km what should I look out for?
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  #2  
Old 10-02-2017, 11:04 PM
ard ard is offline
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Warranty? If you are not a DIY and can add a good BMW-backed extended warranty, that might be useful.

There are a TON of posts about 'issues with diesels'. The emissions/DEF stuff can be problematic.

Otherwise they are pretty solid cars.
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  #3  
Old 10-02-2017, 11:32 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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As ARD said, Emission system (SCR) is a problem. If you are DIY or have good Indy that understands this, it is remarkable machine to own.
Engine is rock solid as transmission. Tranny needs fluid change every 60K (ZF fluid, $26 a bottle) and Transfer Case needs religious fluid change (STRICTLY BMW fluid).
AC evaporator is an issue (14hrs of labor per my Indy, fortunately I had CPO, and still think evaporator was fine, but BMW replaced it).
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:29 AM
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I have the 4.8i. I'm biased towards gas engines and raw power. Heard mixed reviews about bmw diesels. Do they make newer diesel models?

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  #5  
Old 10-03-2017, 04:35 AM
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I have the 4.8i. I'm biased towards gas engines and raw power. Heard mixed reviews about bmw diesels. Do they make newer diesel models?
Offered ATM at BMW USA starting at $60K X5 xDrive 35d
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:48 AM
footballer88 footballer88 is offline
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Ok, they still offer diesel.

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Old 10-03-2017, 05:02 AM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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BMW diesels and modern diesels in general are more expensive to buy than gasoline cars, less reliable and more expensive to operate when you factor in the lower reliability, higher maintenance requirements, and slight savings in fuel.

I own a BMW 335d, and an X5M, I didn't buy a second diesel after owning 1 and wouldn't recommend it to anyone who thinks its a money saving option.

The reason to buy a diesel like any other powertrain is you like it! I love mine, but a money saver it is not. Though admittedly it is cheaper to run a 335d than my X5M, though the X5M has been far and away more reliable engine wise.

Beyond emissions problems, they also suffer from extreme carbon build up which is expensive to repair, glow plug failures, harmonic balancer failures, engine mount problems, boost hose failures, vacuum hose failures, EGR coolers cracking, MAF failures, etc. Occasionally injectors fail too. Oil leaks and cooling system failures they do not suffer from so there is that slight upside.

I've you live in a diesel emissions exempt state you can remove for several thousand dollars many of the least reliable emissions components. But the NOX sensors, SCR tank are all covered by 12yr/120K warranties now. Figure about ~$3K to do a full delete if you diy a bit more if you pay someone.

Personally Ive replaced every single emissions part on my car at least 1x sometimes 4x or more. I've also replaced my boost hoses and I'm about to do my harmonic balancer (61K miles). Yes I've already had a CBU cleaning as well.
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Old 10-03-2017, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Thecastle View Post
BMW diesels and modern diesels in general are more expensive to buy than gasoline cars, less reliable and more expensive to operate when you factor in the lower reliability, higher maintenance requirements, and slight savings in fuel.

I own a BMW 335d, and an X5M, I didn't buy a second diesel after owning 1 and wouldn't recommend it to anyone who thinks its a money saving option.

The reason to buy a diesel like any other powertrain is you like it! I love mine, but a money saver it is not. Though admittedly it is cheaper to run a 335d than my X5M, though the X5M has been far and away more reliable engine wise.

Beyond emissions problems, they also suffer from extreme carbon build up which is expensive to repair, glow plug failures, harmonic balancer failures, engine mount problems, boost hose failures, vacuum hose failures, EGR coolers cracking, MAF failures, etc. Occasionally injectors fail too. Oil leaks and cooling system failures they do not suffer from so there is that slight upside.

I've you live in a diesel emissions exempt state you can remove for several thousand dollars many of the least reliable emissions components. But the NOX sensors, SCR tank are all covered by 12yr/120K warranties now. Figure about ~$3K to do a full delete if you diy a bit more if you pay someone.

Personally Ive replaced every single emissions part on my car at least 1x sometimes 4x or more. I've also replaced my boost hoses and I'm about to do my harmonic balancer (61K miles). Yes I've already had a CBU cleaning as well.
1. The 335d is a VERY different diesel compared to the X5d- massive differences in the diesel emissions reliability. Yes, the X5d has some issues, but using your 335d experience to conclude how the X5 will fare is inaccurate. I have yet to read of a CBU issue on any X5d....

2. Let us know how life with that V8 turns out.... BMWs error which they have tried to cover up with the CCP will come home to roost in the next few years.

3. The 35i gasser is the safest long term bet.
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OEM is Original Equipment Manufacturer... EITHER the company that made the OE part or.... A part this is identical to the OE part, but is sold by the OEM under their own label


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  #9  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:19 AM
edycol edycol is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thecastle View Post
BMW diesels and modern diesels in general are more expensive to buy than gasoline cars, less reliable and more expensive to operate when you factor in the lower reliability, higher maintenance requirements, and slight savings in fuel.



I own a BMW 335d, and an X5M, I didn't buy a second diesel after owning 1 and wouldn't recommend it to anyone who thinks its a money saving option.



The reason to buy a diesel like any other powertrain is you like it! I love mine, but a money saver it is not. Though admittedly it is cheaper to run a 335d than my X5M, though the X5M has been far and away more reliable engine wise.



Beyond emissions problems, they also suffer from extreme carbon build up which is expensive to repair, glow plug failures, harmonic balancer failures, engine mount problems, boost hose failures, vacuum hose failures, EGR coolers cracking, MAF failures, etc. Occasionally injectors fail too. Oil leaks and cooling system failures they do not suffer from so there is that slight upside.



I've you live in a diesel emissions exempt state you can remove for several thousand dollars many of the least reliable emissions components. But the NOX sensors, SCR tank are all covered by 12yr/120K warranties now. Figure about ~$3K to do a full delete if you diy a bit more if you pay someone.



Personally Ive replaced every single emissions part on my car at least 1x sometimes 4x or more. I've also replaced my boost hoses and I'm about to do my harmonic balancer (61K miles). Yes I've already had a CBU cleaning as well.


X5d rarely has CBU issues. Parts you changed so far are not common regardless what you think, except emissions. Glow plug controller could be an issue. Injectors could be an issue on any diesel, but not common unless your partition is broken under the hood. BMW has much more reliable injectors then VW or MB.



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  #10  
Old 10-03-2017, 11:50 AM
viewmountain viewmountain is offline
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<< The 35i gasser is the safest long term bet. >>

It looks that way. This world is not perfect and most people have to make compromises. Performance, reliability, costs, etc. need to be balanced against a person's priorities.

<< Let us know how life with that V8 turns out ... >>

V8 with turbos would be more complicated than an inline 6. Naturally, there could be more issues. Performance is stronger though; therefore, back to priorities.

My V8 is NA, not turbo. Similar to @footballer, I have not had any engine issues so far. When my factory warranty expired 4 years into ownership, I declined BMW's offer for an extended warranty. Basically, I insured against myself. 6 years later, I am glad I did that. Obviously, situations differ and self insurance is not for everyone. However, not all V8's are prone to $10,000 repairs. Some are, some aren't. Challenge is, no one knows which is which.

I am starting to think about a new SUV. The brand new AUDI Q5 looks pretty good on paper. Made in Mexico, however. I need to give it more thoughts LOL. I know, I know, wrong forum ...
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:07 PM
FredoinSF FredoinSF is offline
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I have had my X5d (13th BMW) for over four years. It has been very dependable and practical, and so far I have no regrets.

I started a periodic update thread about 1.5 years ago, here is a link to the thread in case my experience to date helps with your decision:
https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=900176

I would not purchase without doing an inspection that includes checking for leaks as well as a coolant temp test to ensure the thermostat is not failing. I would budget for new thermostat and trans / diff / Transfer case services by 90,000km.
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by ard View Post
1. The 335d is a VERY different diesel compared to the X5d- massive differences in the diesel emissions reliability. ...
Then why did the DEF tank and NOx sensor warranties begin on the X5d rather than 335d?
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:00 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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Originally Posted by viewmountain View Post
<< The 35i gasser is the safest long term bet. >>

It looks that way. This world is not perfect and most people have to make compromises. Performance, reliability, costs, etc. need to be balanced against a person's priorities.

<< Let us know how life with that V8 turns out ... >>

V8 with turbos would be more complicated than an inline 6. Naturally, there could be more issues. Performance is stronger though; therefore, back to priorities.

My V8 is NA, not turbo. Similar to @footballer, I have not had any engine issues so far. When my factory warranty expired 4 years into ownership, I declined BMW's offer for an extended warranty. Basically, I insured against myself. 6 years later, I am glad I did that. Obviously, situations differ and self insurance is not for everyone. However, not all V8's are prone to $10,000 repairs. Some are, some aren't. Challenge is, no one knows which is which.

I am starting to think about a new SUV. The brand new AUDI Q5 looks pretty good on paper. Made in Mexico, however. I need to give it more thoughts LOL. I know, I know, wrong forum ...
Based on complaints about 4.8i, I would say it is much more problematic engine then 3.5d.
One thing about BMW, unlike V8, they really know how to make inline 6 engines, diesel or gas, dos not matter.
Your V8 might be exception to the rule, but yet to see 4.8i owner who did not complain about numerous leaks, valve stems etc.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:39 PM
viewmountain viewmountain is offline
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<< Based on complaints about 4.8i, I would say it is much more problematic engine then 3.5d >>

Again, 8 cylinders would tend to have more "problems" than 6 cylinders. If each cylinder has a 10% defect rate over certain period / mileage, there is a 47% chance for the 6 cylinders to have a problem. Yet, the 8 cylinders would run a 57% chance.

<< One thing about BMW, unlike V8, they really know how to make inline 6 engines, diesel or gas, dos not matter >>

Please see above. Everyone should expect to see more "problems" from 8 cylinders vs. 6 cylinders, inline or not. My guess is, 8 cylinders have more power that some people want.

<< Your V8 might be exception to the rule, but yet to see 4.8i owner who did not complain about numerous leaks, valve stems etc. >>

I don't know that. Like many people have pointed out before, people who come to forums tend to have issues with their wheels. For the ones who are clean, why would they come here? Maybe that's why you have not seen them.

I am just curious. What are the major benefits of a diesel that a Tesla cannot deliver? Tremendous and instant torque. zero to sixty in 2 - 5 seconds, no gas (or diesel) money to speak of, absolutely no engine leaks, etc. I even heard that range anxiety is a thing of the past.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:48 PM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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Originally Posted by ard View Post
1. The 335d is a VERY different diesel compared to the X5d- massive differences in the diesel emissions reliability. Yes, the X5d has some issues, but using your 335d experience to conclude how the X5 will fare is inaccurate. I have yet to read of a CBU issue on any X5d....

2. Let us know how life with that V8 turns out.... BMWs error which they have tried to cover up with the CCP will come home to roost in the next few years.

3. The 35i gasser is the safest long term bet.
1) CBU does happen on the E70 X5 35d, just not as rapidly. The only major difference between the E90 and E70 diesel engines is the E70 employed a low pressure EGR in addition to the high pressure EGR system also found on the 335d. The low pressure EGR is post DPF and using it reduces the amount of soot in the intake. Any easy search pulls up several CBU threads on X5

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/arc.../t-889174.html

https://xoutpost.com/bmw-sav-forums/...-m57-pics.html

2) CCP did not apply to the S63, only the N63. One of the significant contributors to problems on the N63/N62 is high operating themes 105-108c coolant temps, which more rapidly degrades seals. The S63 has a low temp thermostat and operates at around 93c, plus other differences. My S63 has had fewer problems than my M57 period. I have had to open PUMA cases on the M57.

3) I would agree on the 35i gasser being the best long term bet, for lowest cost of ownership. The other engine choices will be more expensive but may offer rewards that the 35i wouldn't to the driver. Having owned the N62 4.8i, S63 and M57 e90 I would say the most reliable has been my S63 with zero problems in 45K miles other than a bad CCV hose, next would be my 4.8i which I drove to 98K miles and it did develop bad valve stem seals. The least has been the M57 emissions, I have not had a single problem with the engine per say other than a failing harmonic balancer, but every emissions component has failed at least once, and its been in the shop for months and had puma cases. Problem was solved by tuning and deleting once the warranty ran out.

Last edited by Thecastle; 10-03-2017 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:52 PM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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Originally Posted by edycol View Post
X5d rarely has CBU issues. Parts you changed so far are not common regardless what you think, except emissions. Glow plug controller could be an issue. Injectors could be an issue on any diesel, but not common unless your partition is broken under the hood. BMW has much more reliable injectors then VW or MB.



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The parts what I listed are what are commonly failing on the 335ds. The Glow plugs happen on both cars due to the thermostat failing silently and the engine running too cool causing the system to run glow plugs continuously.

Lots of threads on bad injectors, and injector replacements.
http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=771507

http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1290545

http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1046584


The glow plugs and injectors are not as frequent as some other failures like the harmonic balancer and red boost hose seals, etc.
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Old 10-03-2017, 03:01 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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Originally Posted by viewmountain View Post
<< Based on complaints about 4.8i, I would say it is much more problematic engine then 3.5d >>



Again, 8 cylinders would tend to have more "problems" than 6 cylinders. If each cylinder has a 10% defect rate over certain period / mileage, there is a 47% chance for the 6 cylinders to have a problem. Yet, the 8 cylinders would run a 57% chance.



<< One thing about BMW, unlike V8, they really know how to make inline 6 engines, diesel or gas, dos not matter >>



Please see above. Everyone should expect to see more "problems" from 8 cylinders vs. 6 cylinders, inline or not. My guess is, 8 cylinders have more power that some people want.



<< Your V8 might be exception to the rule, but yet to see 4.8i owner who did not complain about numerous leaks, valve stems etc. >>



I don't know that. Like many people have pointed out before, people who come to forums tend to have issues with their wheels. For the ones who are clean, why would they come here? Maybe that's why you have not seen them.



I am just curious. What are the major benefits of a diesel that a Tesla cannot deliver? Tremendous and instant torque. zero to sixty in 2 - 5 seconds, no gas (or diesel) money to speak of, absolutely no engine leaks, etc. I even heard that range anxiety is a thing of the past.


You do not know about leaks on 48i? And your theory about reliability is: 2 more cyl will have equal amount of problems? Yes in wild theory. That would be possible is 35i and 48i are built on same platform, meaning both are V engines. However, that is not how things work since those are different architectures.



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Old 10-03-2017, 03:03 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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Originally Posted by Thecastle View Post
1) CBU does happen on the E70 X5 35d, just not as rapidly. The only major difference between the E90 and E70 diesel engines is the E70 employed a low pressure EGR in addition to the high pressure EGR system also found on the 335d. The low pressure EGR is post DPF and using it reduces the amount of soot in the intake. Any easy search pulls up several CBU threads on X5

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/arc.../t-889174.html

https://xoutpost.com/bmw-sav-forums/...-m57-pics.html

2) CCP did not apply to the S63, only the N63. One of the significant contributors to problems on the N63/N62 is high operating themes 105-108c coolant temps, which more rapidly degrades seals. The S63 has a low temp thermostat and operates at around 93c, plus other differences. My S63 has had fewer problems than my M57 period. I have had to open PUMA cases on the M57.

3) I would agree on the 35i gasser being the best long term bet, for lowest cost of ownership. The other engine choices will be more expensive but may offer rewards that the 35i wouldn't to the driver. Having owned the N62 4.8i, S63 and M57 e90 I would say the most reliable has been my S63 with zero problems in 45K miles other than a bad CCV hose, next would be my 4.8i which I drove to 98K miles and it did develop bad valve stem seals. The least has been the M57 emissions, I have not had a single problem with the engine per say other than a failing harmonic balancer, but every emissions component has failed at least once, and its been in the shop for months and had puma cases. Problem was solved by tuning and deleting once the warranty ran out.


CBU happens on E70s exhaustively driven in cities.
CBU is primarily American problem. I yet to see 335d with that problem in Europe where BMWs are driven the way they are suppose to be driven.



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Old 10-03-2017, 03:05 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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Originally Posted by Thecastle View Post
The parts what I listed are what are commonly failing on the 335ds. The Glow plugs happen on both cars due to the thermostat failing silently and the engine running too cool causing the system to run glow plugs continuously.



Lots of threads on bad injectors, and injector replacements.

http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=771507



http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1290545



http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1046584





The glow plugs and injectors are not as frequent as some other failures like the harmonic balancer and red boost hose seals, etc.


Then you change thermostat. You do not allow to fail to extremely low temp. My brother had 525d M57 that clocked 294,000 miles, and didnt have single issue you mentioned except thermostat.


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Old 10-03-2017, 03:34 PM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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Originally Posted by edycol View Post
CBU happens on E70's exhaustively driven in cities.
CBU is primarily American problem. I yet to see 335d with that problem in Europe where BMW's are driven the way they are suppose to be driven.



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I'm glad I can help clarify this for you then ;-)

There are tons of threads about CBU on European M57s. It happens to everyone with a diesel who uses EGR pre-dbf. Fords, Dodges, Chevy's europeans. The reason you may have missed the threads is Europeans refer to CBU as coking.

http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=675023

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=853694

I'll bite how is that city driving somehow accelerates CBU? EGR is open all the time to reduce combustion temps and not and closes when the engine is under full load and attempting to warm and DPF regent. Its the soot, mixed with oil and heat that causes CBU. its EGR use, and soot in the exhaust being recirculated that is the culprit. The more the engine is on, the more carbon it will build up, its a problem with every modern direct injected engine for that matter.

Last edited by Thecastle; 10-03-2017 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 10-03-2017, 03:36 PM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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Then you change thermostat. You do not allow to fail to extremely low temp. My brother had 525d M57 that clocked 294,000 miles, and didn't have single issue you mentioned except thermostat.


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Thats fantastic, and back when diesels had longevity and no complicated emissions control that could be easily defeated by simply unplugging the EGR valve. Making diesels legendary, how ever the world is very different for modern diesels.

there is no us 525d Also this engine bears very little resemblance to the US engines, particularly in regards to emissions. It has no SCR, and a totally different EGR setup, 2.5L vs 3.0L, different engine management computer, single turbo vs twin turbo, etc. The US M57 was the 1st to use SCR, brand new engine management, different EGR with cooler, etc. This is kind of like comparing a N52 with an N54. the 525d doesnt share the same engine model with US 35ds. M57D25 vs M57D30TTOP

There is no way to know the temp sensor has failed on the car without running a diagnostic, which is why so many people run with a bad t-stat. The 1st symptom for most is lower fuel economy. There is no temperature gauge on the us E90/E70 335ds

Last edited by Thecastle; 10-03-2017 at 03:51 PM.
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:43 PM
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Thinking of buying a 2013 x5 35d with 60000 km what should I look out for?
In general
-Corrosion or collision derived body/suspension issues
-Verifiable maintenance history by qualified technicians, and low ownership history
-Verify options and packages you desire before shopping, I assume Canadian options and US are different but similar. Upgraded "Comfort Seats" are a must-have option in my opinion.
-Get a PRE-Purchase inspection from a shop very familiar with BMW diesels.

In particular, to supplement the aforementioned inspection
-Verify coolant temp is over 75*c, and use current reading as a gauge to how soon a thermostat is coming. Spec is 88*c (shop tool or instrument cluster trickery)
-Check average regeneration interval (shop tool) and average fuel economy (instrument cluster). Together, Economy over 12 l/100km and Regenerations around 500km or further apart should suggest a pretty healthy emissions system and running condition in general.
-Check distance traveled since codes last cleared (shop tool)

Cars that have issues tend to keep having issues, cars that have few issues seem to stay that way with good maint and driving patterns. I think a lot of the *problem* cars are nurtured to that state by careless/oblivious owners or underqualified mechanics.

Cars with (virtually unusable) 3rd row seats add air suspension. Good for towing, liability for maintenance. Cars without 3rd row seat have a giant subfloor storage area in the trunk.

Last edited by dzlbimmer; 10-03-2017 at 05:05 PM.
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  #23  
Old 10-03-2017, 04:47 PM
ard ard is offline
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Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn...

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Alignment here: The Definitive Alignment Thread

OE is Original Equipment aka 'BMW Original Parts' aka 'What you buy at the BMW dealer with a BMW label'

OEM is Original Equipment Manufacturer... EITHER the company that made the OE part or.... A part this is identical to the OE part, but is sold by the OEM under their own label


OEM is not what BMW sells


http://www.bimmerzone.com/category/T...ricks_OEM.html

https://www.turnermotorsport.com/t-OEvsOEM
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  #24  
Old 10-03-2017, 05:19 PM
edycol edycol is offline
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Location: Colorado Springs
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thecastle View Post
I'm glad I can help clarify this for you then ;-)

There are tons of threads about CBU on European M57s. It happens to everyone with a diesel who uses EGR pre-dbf. Fords, Dodges, Chevy's europeans. The reason you may have missed the threads is Europeans refer to CBU as coking.

http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=675023

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=853694

I'll bite how is that city driving somehow accelerates CBU? EGR is open all the time to reduce combustion temps and not and closes when the engine is under full load and attempting to warm and DPF regent. Its the soot, mixed with oil and heat that causes CBU. its EGR use, and soot in the exhaust being recirculated that is the culprit. The more the engine is on, the more carbon it will build up, its a problem with every modern direct injected engine for that matter.


I know what causes CBU. Numerous threads on that. Usually it is high NOACK oil that makes things really problematic.
But, since 2000 I owned these diesel vehicles: VW Vento 1.9 tdi, Lancia Lybra 2.4JTD, Skoda Octavia 1.9 tdi, another Octavia 1.9tdi, Peugeot 407 1.6tdi, Peugeot 508 2.2hdi GT, BMW 525d. Of all those cars I had to replace Egr only on Vento and Octavia. No CBU on valves.
So, unless I am missing something, tell me when that will show up? All those cars made well over 300k km, so I can tell people who bought them from me.


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  #25  
Old 10-04-2017, 02:50 AM
Thecastle Thecastle is offline
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Location: Houston, TX
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edycol View Post
I know what causes CBU. Numerous threads on that. Usually it is high NOACK oil that makes things really problematic.
But, since 2000 I owned these diesel vehicles: VW Vento 1.9 tdi, Lancia Lybra 2.4JTD, Skoda Octavia 1.9 tdi, another Octavia 1.9tdi, Peugeot 407 1.6tdi, Peugeot 508 2.2hdi GT, BMW 525d. Of all those cars I had to replace Egr only on Vento and Octavia. No CBU on valves.
So, unless I am missing something, tell me when that will show up? All those cars made well over 300k km, so I can tell people who bought them from me.


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So you've been trying to draw an invalid comparison. The diesels you have experience with are mostly older euro 5 emissions standard. The US was the 1st that required tight NOx emissions which required a large increase in EGR usage and for the 1st time an SCR and in many cases a DPF. ITs the large amount of EGR pre-dpf that make US cars especially prone to the problem, but no diesel of any age is immune if they have EGR. eliminate the "ATM" and problem is mostly solved.

So on 1/3 of the cars you're had a coking (CBU) problem that plugged up your EGR? Your problem just manifested in a different location. Its the soot being trapped that people call CBU. Mix enough charcoal dust with oil and jam it in the intake of an engine and it will clog.

Its not possible to tell from a simple visual inspection if your car is developing Coking or Carbon Buildup. Most people won't know they are suffering from CBU initially as it manifests its self in a gradual decline of performance, which is generally unoticable. You can have a lot of build up before the engine won't run correctly. Its a malady of every direct injection engine both gasoline and diesel. The only way to verify that you don't have a cbu problem is to use a horoscope to inspect the intake and cylinders for CBU, the valves can generally only be inspected by removing the intake. Send us some pictures for your clean intakes! Most engines seem to run fine to the owner even with some build up.

The only solutions I've seen that really prevent CBU are minimizing oil and soot in the intake track, special coatings to prevent adherence of coking (not very successful), adding an injector into the intake to inject fuel to clean valves (toyota, ford, VW) does this. BTW VWs suffer from CBU all the time too, so do other car manufacturers this isn't a uniquely BMW phenomena.

Its also an issue made much worse by modern (your engines are high emissions) emissions controls which require large amounts of EGR and SCR to reduce nox.

https://www.audiworld.com/forums/a8-...si-v8-2884294/

http://www.myturbodiesel.com/wiki/in...k4-tdi-engine/

Last edited by Thecastle; 10-04-2017 at 03:45 AM.
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