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  #1  
Old 02-08-2003, 08:02 PM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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My Garage - please help

I'm uncertain where to post this but I'll try here, since this is a DIY for me.

Attached is a picture of my garage. As you can see, there is a large crack running down the center, which was poorly patched when I bought my place.

The floor is disgusting. The original owner had an old Buick that leaked oil everywhere. The tread marks are very old too.

I have scrubbed the floor with Tide and other stripping detergents, but nothing seems to work.

I went to Home Depot to research some kind of 'floor covering' system for a garage. What I saw was very toxic, with multiple layers and curing time.

Has anyone applied a cover to their concrete garage floor, or painted it or put some other layer or padding over it? Or, is there some fabulous cleaner that will strip all of this 4 year old junk off the floor?

One concern is not being able to monitor any continued settling of the garage and the running crack. There is a lot of traffic on the other side of the back wall, and this continues to be a concern.

Also, the garage is the bottom level of my 3 story condo. I sit on this garage and I don't want to get in a situation where I am inhaling toxic fumes because of my A/R.

Any advice is appreciated and thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 02-08-2003, 08:13 PM
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bren bren is offline
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Re: My Garage - please help

:repost: sorry...I just had to use this since its still so new

You might want to check this thread for some ideas.
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  #3  
Old 02-08-2003, 08:22 PM
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I'm planning on doing mine with U COAT IT this summer. Looks like great stuff.

Watch the video.

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  #4  
Old 02-08-2003, 08:39 PM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Re: Re: My Garage - please help

Quote:
Originally posted by bren
:repost: sorry...I just had to use this since its still so new

You might want to check this thread for some ideas.
Oops. I did a search a month or so ago but failed to do one again. Lots of good info there. Thank you.
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Old 02-08-2003, 08:59 PM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Originally posted by johnlew
I'm planning on doing mine with U COAT IT this summer. Looks like great stuff.

Watch the video.
Well that seems to be a popular choice from the thread bren linked me to.

'Sonya' makes it look so easy. Unfortunately, I knew there would be muriatic acid involved. That stuff scares me to death. I'll have to wrap up in a beekeeper outfit like that thing your wife was wearing one time. Thanks.
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Old 02-08-2003, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by GalBimmer
Well that seems to be a popular choice from the thread bren linked me to.

'Sonya' makes it look so easy. Unfortunately, I knew there would be muriatic acid involved. That stuff scares me to death. I'll have to wrap up in a beekeeper outfit like that thing your wife was wearing one time. Thanks.
I think any application will require it...etches the surface to provide bonding capability for the material.
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Old 02-09-2003, 05:52 AM
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All concrete painting systems and even good tile or carpet requires you to neutralize and etch the surface.

Realize you put 1 gallon of muriatic acid in some 4 - 5 gallons of water. So it isn't that big a deal. I used a plastic waering can to spread it and then scrubbed with a bristle brush.

Also the concrete is very alkaline, so as soon as you pour it on the floor, it is close to neutralize anyway. Just have a hose handy to rinse any spills. Wear gloves and a face shield or goggles to protect your eyes from splashes.

As for cleaning the grease off, there are several products that will do that. U-Coat-It sells a prep kit that has a citrus based cleaner. Walmart has a couple of products for cleaning the concrete, one is by Castrol. Look in the automotive section.

And I second the recommendation for U-Coat-It if you want a very durable, ong life, GUARANTEED product.

The Rustoleum or Behr setups look reasonable, but not as good as U-Coat-It.

But I did our 1 car garage in the house plus the rest of the basement shop area with Drylock latex floor paint. But you still need to etch.
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Old 02-09-2003, 06:11 AM
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Nobody's seemed to attend to your concerns over the running crack yet. It seems that your slab for the garage did not include any expansion joints. That's not really a problem, and I have the same issue with my garage floor.

Normal settling and expansion and contraction of the slab occurs through the various seasons of the year. It's common practice to break the slab up in uniform areas by embedding a plastic divider in the concrete while it's being poured. This allows for movement of the slabs independant of each other.

As I said, mine does not have this set up either (although my neighbors do, who had their houses built around the same time, by the same builder, as my house).

I do understand that it's not really aesthetically pleasing to look at, but if you patch it, then you are solidifying the slab into one big piece again, and it will crack again. So, unless you want to pay somebody to use a concrete cutter to cut uniform stress joints in the concrete, I wouldn't worry about it. The only need for concern if there is buckling at the fracture point, indicating that the two plates have too much stress sqeezing them together. From your pic, it doesnt appear that this is the case though.
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Old 02-09-2003, 10:52 AM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pinecone
All concrete painting systems and even good tile or carpet requires you to neutralize and etch the surface.

Realize you put 1 gallon of muriatic acid in some 4 - 5 gallons of water. So it isn't that big a deal. I used a plastic waering can to spread it and then scrubbed with a bristle brush.

Also the concrete is very alkaline, so as soon as you pour it on the floor, it is close to neutralize anyway. Just have a hose handy to rinse any spills. Wear gloves and a face shield or goggles to protect your eyes from splashes.

As for cleaning the grease off, there are several products that will do that. U-Coat-It sells a prep kit that has a citrus based cleaner. Walmart has a couple of products for cleaning the concrete, one is by Castrol. Look in the automotive section.

And I second the recommendation for U-Coat-It if you want a very durable, ong life, GUARANTEED product.

The Rustoleum or Behr setups look reasonable, but not as good as U-Coat-It.

But I did our 1 car garage in the house plus the rest of the basement shop area with Drylock latex floor paint. But you still need to etch.
Thanks for the input. I had not thought about it but you're right - the diluted acid should not be much of a problem (although safety is still critical). I had a bad experience with muriatic acid, a pressure washer and red mud stains on my driveway many years ago. I learned to respect the chemical.

Thanks for the shopping suggestions - this sounds like a project I can handle.

I just realized that I used to read your posts on the M Coupe board at roadfly.
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  #10  
Old 02-09-2003, 11:05 AM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by LarryN
Nobody's seemed to attend to your concerns over the running crack yet. It seems that your slab for the garage did not include any expansion joints. That's not really a problem, and I have the same issue with my garage floor.

Normal settling and expansion and contraction of the slab occurs through the various seasons of the year. It's common practice to break the slab up in uniform areas by embedding a plastic divider in the concrete while it's being poured. This allows for movement of the slabs independant of each other.

As I said, mine does not have this set up either (although my neighbors do, who had their houses built around the same time, by the same builder, as my house).

I do understand that it's not really aesthetically pleasing to look at, but if you patch it, then you are solidifying the slab into one big piece again, and it will crack again. So, unless you want to pay somebody to use a concrete cutter to cut uniform stress joints in the concrete, I wouldn't worry about it. The only need for concern if there is buckling at the fracture point, indicating that the two plates have too much stress sqeezing them together. From your pic, it doesnt appear that this is the case though.
Thank you for that information. As I read your explanation I remembered that my last home had a 'sectioned' garage and driveway - I'm sure it was for this purpose.

The crack has not expanded in 3 years, and lord knows we've had extreme weather, so hopefully you are right and I am ok.

The builder was just plain cheap, but he could be as the location is considered primo. I am sure when I sell there will be no ROI for this project, but I think it will bring me enough pleasure regardless.

Thanks for the advice.
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  #11  
Old 02-09-2003, 04:12 PM
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Pinecone Pinecone is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by LarryN
Nobody's seemed to attend to your concerns over the running crack yet. It seems that your slab for the garage did not include any expansion joints. That's not really a problem, and I have the same issue with my garage floor.

Normal settling and expansion and contraction of the slab occurs through the various seasons of the year. It's common practice to break the slab up in uniform areas by embedding a plastic divider in the concrete while it's being poured. This allows for movement of the slabs independant of each other.

As I said, mine does not have this set up either (although my neighbors do, who had their houses built around the same time, by the same builder, as my house).

I do understand that it's not really aesthetically pleasing to look at, but if you patch it, then you are solidifying the slab into one big piece again, and it will crack again. So, unless you want to pay somebody to use a concrete cutter to cut uniform stress joints in the concrete, I wouldn't worry about it. The only need for concern if there is buckling at the fracture point, indicating that the two plates have too much stress sqeezing them together. From your pic, it doesnt appear that this is the case though.
Or, you could have a "sectioned" concrete piece and have it still crack.

Especially when it is a brand new , VERY expensive, concrete driveway.

I would still patch the crack. Many of the crack patches don't have the strength to actually bind the two parts back together. Some are even somewhat flexible. Also, depending on how old the garage is, the settling should be pretty much over now.
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  #12  
Old 02-09-2003, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by GalBimmer
Thanks for the input. I had not thought about it but you're right - the diluted acid should not be much of a problem (although safety is still critical). I had a bad experience with muriatic acid, a pressure washer and red mud stains on my driveway many years ago. I learned to respect the chemical.

Thanks for the shopping suggestions - this sounds like a project I can handle.

I just realized that I used to read your posts on the M Coupe board at roadfly.
I still occasionally go there.

I am not minimizing the hazards, just suggesting that the risk might not be that high, when properly used.

Of course wear proper protective equipment. Have a good source of water handy, and don't pressure wash until you have thoroughly flushed the acid away.

BTW the Behr system uses phosphoric acid (available at Home Depot) which is slightly less of a hazard to handle. But it also doesn't work as well.
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Old 02-09-2003, 06:00 PM
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Terry Kennedy Terry Kennedy is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pinecone
Or, you could have a "sectioned" concrete piece and have it still crack.
Nah - if you're crazy enough you can have a slab that won't crack My garage was rebuilt from a collapsed shell to my detailed specs. I have a one-piece 22' x 26' slab made out of airport runway concrete, between 6" and 10" thick, with reinforcing mesh inside. This nearly 5 years old now. Here's one small picture:

and you can see the whole series and larger pictures here. You can get pretty much any kind of concrete you want for the same price as regular concrete if you're willing to wait for it (you'll get the excess material from somebody else's mix).
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Old 02-10-2003, 05:21 PM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Terry Kennedy
Nah - if you're crazy enough you can have a slab that won't crack My garage was rebuilt from a collapsed shell to my detailed specs. I have a one-piece 22' x 26' slab made out of airport runway concrete, between 6" and 10" thick, with reinforcing mesh inside. This nearly 5 years old now. Here's one small picture and you can see the whole series and larger pictures here. You can get pretty much any kind of concrete you want for the same price as regular concrete if you're willing to wait for it (you'll get the excess material from somebody else's mix).
Holy Cow! Now that's the king daddy of garages - very nice!!
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Old 02-12-2003, 05:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by GalBimmer
Holy Cow! Now that's the king daddy of garages - very nice!!
Naw, too small.

No pics right now, but I am in the process of finishing a 30 x 36 garage (single slab) 11 feet high at the eves with special trusses that add slightly over 2 feeet of ceiling clearance in the middle 20 feet.

Two garage doors (10 feet wide) and one people door. The lift will be installed in the right hand bay sort of the middle of the garage (the people door is at the far right). Compressed air plumbed throughout. A quad outlet every 48 inches around the perimeter. Wired for TIG, MIG and Plasma cutter.

Lots of shelves and storage space. Lots of light. Heated and air conditioned. Lots of workbench space.

No THAT'S a garage.
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Old 02-12-2003, 07:10 PM
GalBimmer GalBimmer is offline
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Originally posted by Pinecone
No THAT'S a garage.
Uh, Pinecone - good lord!

Sounds amazing - get some pics to post as you go along. I'd love to watch the progress.

Makes my little garage chore seem easy.
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Old 02-13-2003, 03:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by GalBimmer
Uh, Pinecone - good lord!

Sounds amazing - get some pics to post as you go along. I'd love to watch the progress.

Makes my little garage chore seem easy.
If I remember to take a camera out this weekend when working, I will. The wiring is in, but power is not run to the building. I am trying to get that done this weekend.

We have about half the front wall (one wiht doors) drywalled and the back on one side wall done. I hope to get the last sidewall and finish up piecing the front wall in around the doors.

Next big task is taping and mudding the drywall, then painting.

Then comes lights and fans in teh ceiling, and installing all the outlets around the walls.

The cabinets and shleves.

Heck, wehn I write it down, it seems like a LOT of work left.
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Old 02-18-2003, 06:40 PM
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How's this for a garage? My buddy, the one with the Z8. The mini is sold. He's moving, the new garage will be an improvement! Heat/Air, TV, Sinks w/hot, cold water, Compressed air, floor drain. The picture is of him racing his yellow 356.
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Old 02-19-2003, 04:28 AM
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Quote:
The lift will be installed
I think a lift is the ultimate "component" to add to a garage. Maybe in my next life.....
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Old 02-19-2003, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by elfhearse
I think a lift is the ultimate "component" to add to a garage. Maybe in my next life.....
Actually they aren't THAT expensive. I was surprised. Eagle Equipment (www.eagleequip.com) has 4 post lifts for about $3000 delivered and 2 post lifts for about $2500. A local company will install a 2 post lift for about $500.

If you are interested, I have been working with Steve Tacchi at Eagle (extension 116).
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