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X5 E70 (2007 - 2013)
E70 BMW X5 produced between 2007 and 2013. Discuss the E70 X5 with other BMW owners here.

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  #26  
Old 09-12-2019, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Flying Ace View Post
I would add, one annoying part that seems to constantly fail is the glow plugs and module. Those parts are not covered under any manufacture extended emissions parts warranty. Also note that owning a turbo car tends to result in a lot of annoying oil and coolant leaks as there's a lot of extra plumbing involved for cooling. So just be prepared for the time and money in tracing the source of the leaks and fixing them. I see you already own an older gen X3, so needless to say you're also dealing with an aging BMW, which isn't cheap from fixes and maintenance standpoint.

I would also caution you on your driving habits. As others mentioned it's a car that requires to be driven under moderate load (mountain climbing/towing) and long distances often for the health of your emissions equipment. If you're doing a lot of short urban driving, I would recommend you stay away from the diesel. It'll wreck havoc on your expensive AGM battery and emissions parts (latter is covered under various emissions warranty).

That said, the D gets amazing fuel mileage. I often return 26-29 mpgs with a fully loaded car on road trips. (24 with a roof box) That's not too shabby for a 5000lb vehicle. The E70 itself is also a very well designed car. Huge wide interior, great hydraulic steering feel, AWD and optional 3rd row seats. What more can you ask for?
I've yet to find anything
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  #27  
Old 09-18-2019, 06:18 AM
NW-99SS NW-99SS is offline
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Originally Posted by Flying Ace View Post
I would add, one annoying part that seems to constantly fail is the glow plugs and module. Those parts are not covered under any manufacture extended emissions parts warranty. Also note that owning a turbo car tends to result in a lot of annoying oil and coolant leaks as there's a lot of extra plumbing involved for cooling. So just be prepared for the time and money in tracing the source of the leaks and fixing them. I see you already own an older gen X3, so needless to say you're also dealing with an aging BMW, which isn't cheap from fixes and maintenance standpoint.

I would also caution you on your driving habits. As others mentioned it's a car that requires to be driven under moderate load (mountain climbing/towing) and long distances often for the health of your emissions equipment. If you're doing a lot of short urban driving, I would recommend you stay away from the diesel. It'll wreck havoc on your expensive AGM battery and emissions parts (latter is covered under various emissions warranty).

That said, the D gets amazing fuel mileage. I often return 26-29 mpgs with a fully loaded car on road trips. (24 with a roof box) That's not too shabby for a 5000lb vehicle. The E70 itself is also a very well designed car. Huge wide interior, great hydraulic steering feel, AWD and optional 3rd row seats. What more can you ask for?
Having owned diesels for most of my adult life (including other turbo vehicles), I find that most oil leaks - especially those that are oil cooler line related (usually to the turbo), are from improper shutdown while the EGTs and turbo is still too hot. Turbo vehicles require an idle period before shutdown that most users don't realize or get too impatient to perform.
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  #28  
Old 09-18-2019, 06:54 AM
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Turbo vehicles require an idle period before shutdown that most users don't realize or get too impatient to perform.
I would be doing that if I thought it would help. Never heard this before.

What I have heard is about is an idle period not being good with the DEF fluid.
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  #29  
Old 09-18-2019, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by 2010xdrive35d View Post
I would be doing that if I thought it would help. Never heard this before.

What I have heard is about is an idle period not being good with the DEF fluid.
It will absolutely help - and does apply in all turbo engine applications.

The idle time is not long enough to affect the DEF or exhaust emissions system.

Here is the reason it is necessary:

While driving, your turbo gets hot from exhaust gases...and hotter with more aggressive driving than not. Oil is used to keep the turbo bearings cool and to lubricate them. If you shut down your turbo engine hot, the oil stops pumping, and the hot turbo "cooks" off the oil in the lines and bearing (notice that you see more turbo issues these days as fewer people understand the problems with shutting down a hot turbo). The oil lines and seals deteriorate over time, and bearing damage as well when shut down very hot, causing leaks and turbo issues.

My minimum cool down time is 60 seconds. To properly cool down your EGTs (exhaust gas temperatures), you can install an EGT gauge into your hot side before the turbo to get a precise reading. You will be very surprised at some of the temps you will see, and how idling brings the temperature down and allows the turbo to cool.

My experience included all types of turbo diesel farm implements, highway tractors, 4 German passenger vehicle turbo diesels, and of course our 335xi. In all my years, knock on wood, we have never experienced a turbo or oil line failure on any of pieces of equipment or vehicles, even though my father-in-law told us we would on our MB ML350s (he is a senior MB mechanic now semi-retired)...we never had one oil leak on our MLs.
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  #30  
Old 09-18-2019, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by NW-99SS View Post
It will absolutely help - and does apply in all turbo engine applications.

The idle time is not long enough to affect the DEF or exhaust emissions system.

Here is the reason it is necessary:

While driving, your turbo gets hot from exhaust gases...and hotter with more aggressive driving than not. Oil is used to keep the turbo bearings cool and to lubricate them. If you shut down your turbo engine hot, the oil stops pumping, and the hot turbo "cooks" off the oil in the lines and bearing (notice that you see more turbo issues these days as fewer people understand the problems with shutting down a hot turbo). The oil lines and seals deteriorate over time, and bearing damage as well when shut down very hot, causing leaks and turbo issues.

My minimum cool down time is 60 seconds. To properly cool down your EGTs (exhaust gas temperatures), you can install an EGT gauge into your hot side before the turbo to get a precise reading. You will be very surprised at some of the temps you will see, and how idling brings the temperature down and allows the turbo to cool.

My experience included all types of turbo diesel farm implements, highway tractors, 4 German passenger vehicle turbo diesels, and of course our 335xi. In all my years, knock on wood, we have never experienced a turbo or oil line failure on any of pieces of equipment or vehicles, even though my father-in-law told us we would on our MB ML350s (he is a senior MB mechanic now semi-retired)...we never had one oil leak on our MLs.
Duly Noted. I always have atleast a minute or two to spare before shutting down the engine.
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  #31  
Old 09-18-2019, 08:57 AM
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Duly Noted. I always have atleast a minute or two to spare before shutting down the engine.
Good plan
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  #32  
Old 09-19-2019, 03:58 AM
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Idle down to cool off is smart but these cars have a habit of starting regen a few minutes before getting home. Idling during a regen doesn't lower egt and its stupid that the car doesn't get the clue to stop regen even after a few minutes of idling!

So good advice but when I brought up this concern elsewhere, I was told that 30 seconds is a good number to get the egt down to a safe number even while regen is running. I don't fully agree but I'm sure it doesn't cause an issue since cars are still running... Though we hear stories about turbo oil drain lines coking even though we use synthetic
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  #33  
Old 09-19-2019, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by NW-99SS View Post
Having owned diesels for most of my adult life (including other turbo vehicles), I find that most oil leaks - especially those that are oil cooler line related (usually to the turbo), are from improper shutdown while the EGTs and turbo is still too hot. Turbo vehicles require an idle period before shutdown that most users don't realize or get too impatient to perform.
Turbo cool down before shutdown - always.

There is no need to do an elaborate cool down procedure but there are a few things you can easily do. I try to decelerate/coast in gear as much as possible just as I arrive at my destination. Fueling goes to zero whenever the engine is in an overrun condition such as decelerating in gear so this will greatly help lower EGTs. The ideal case is decelerating in gear from highway speed to low speed and all the way into a parking spot in a rest area without any stops before reaching the parking spot. I always try to give a 2 minute cool down at my destination when I've been driving the car hard. This can be hard to do when arriving at your destination and needing to P in a hurry.

By far the easiest thing to do when arriving at your destination is to switch the order of things around before shutting the car off. People usually turn the car off and then unbuckle their seatbelt and then gather up their stuff before getting out. Instead of turning the car off being the FIRST thing you do, make turning the car off the LAST thing you do before getting out. This automatically gives some turbo cool down time without wasting your time.

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Why DIESEL is better: (from wxmanCCM)
PM - https://sites.google.com/view/lmarzccm/home
Air Toxics - https://sites.google.com/view/loren-marz-ccm/home
Ozone Precursors - https://sites.google.com/view/lorenmarz-ccm/home
General - https://sites.google.com/view/emissions-general/home

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  #34  
Old 09-19-2019, 09:36 AM
edycol edycol is online now
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Originally Posted by n1das View Post
Turbo cool down before shutdown - always.

There is no need to do an elaborate cool down procedure but there are a few things you can easily do. I try to decelerate/coast in gear as much as possible just as I arrive at my destination. Fueling goes to zero whenever the engine is in an overrun condition such as decelerating in gear so this will greatly help lower EGTs. The ideal case is decelerating in gear from highway speed to low speed and all the way into a parking spot in a rest area without any stops before reaching the parking spot. I always try to give a 2 minute cool down at my destination when I've been driving the car hard. This can be hard to do when arriving at your destination and needing to P in a hurry.

By far the easiest thing to do when arriving at your destination is to switch the order of things around before shutting the car off. People usually turn the car off and then unbuckle their seatbelt and then gather up their stuff before getting out. Instead of turning the car off being the FIRST thing you do, make turning the car off the LAST thing you do before getting out. This automatically gives some turbo cool down time without wasting your time.

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No need to idle. Best way to cool down engine and with that turbo (s) is to drive last few miles normal, in low rpm range. That will allow oil and coolant to be properly cooled off.


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  #35  
Old 09-20-2019, 09:07 AM
NW-99SS NW-99SS is offline
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Originally Posted by edycol View Post
No need to idle. Best way to cool down engine and with that turbo (s) is to drive last few miles normal, in low rpm range. That will allow oil and coolant to be properly cooled off.


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I disagree based on EGT monitoring.
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  #36  
Old 09-20-2019, 10:16 AM
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I disagree based on EGT monitoring.


Last few miles of normal driving will put coolant and oil temperatures to normal range. I had M57 in E61 525d that made some 425k km before known ground issue on battery burned the car. I would do regular runs 120-135mph on hwys in Europe, cool down engine driving it off hwy for few km, turned it off. Even at 425k km engine never burned a drop if oil, let alone turbo being problematic.


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  #37  
Old 09-20-2019, 10:47 AM
NW-99SS NW-99SS is offline
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Originally Posted by edycol View Post
Last few miles of normal driving will put coolant and oil temperatures to normal range. I had M57 in E61 525d that made some 425k km before known ground issue on battery burned the car. I would do regular runs 120-135mph on hwys in Europe, cool down engine driving it off hwy for few km, turned it off. Even at 425k km engine never burned a drop if oil, let alone turbo being problematic.


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I have no issue with your cool down procedure. But again, I base my cool down on EGT readings, and those I monitor on many different applications as stated earlier. In almost all instances, your procedure will be adequate, but nothing is as accurate as monitoring EGTs.
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  #38  
Old 09-21-2019, 10:30 AM
robnitro robnitro is offline
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If you park and the stupid car still is doing regen, egts will not drop much. What gets me is that how many people that do short trips might be idling and still shutting down a hot turbo? I think that's why some have found clogged up turbo oil return lines. Synthetic is good, but I think the bmw oil might not be that strong of a synthetic.
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  #39  
Old 09-21-2019, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by n1das View Post

By far the easiest thing to do when arriving at your destination is to switch the order of things around before shutting the car off. People usually turn the car off and then unbuckle their seatbelt and then gather up their stuff before getting out. Instead of turning the car off being the FIRST thing you do, make turning the car off the LAST thing you do before getting out. This automatically gives some turbo cool down time without wasting your time.
+1


on my 996tt, i will get out... get all my crap... and last thing reach back in and turn off the key, pull it out and lock up. and thats after puttering for the last minute or two.
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OEM is not what BMW sells


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  #40  
Old 09-21-2019, 06:14 PM
edycol edycol is online now
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Originally Posted by NW-99SS View Post
I have no issue with your cool down procedure. But again, I base my cool down on EGT readings, and those I monitor on many different applications as stated earlier. In almost all instances, your procedure will be adequate, but nothing is as accurate as monitoring EGTs.


And point is? What will happen to you turbo if EGT is higher? Enlighten us!


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  #41  
Old 09-21-2019, 11:37 PM
SPL15 SPL15 is offline
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For the OP: I seriously recommend planning on several thousand dollars ($10K+ if you plan on the dealership doing the work) of recommended and / or necessary repairs on a 100K mile X5d, regardless of how "mint" of condition the current owner / dealership pretends it to be... If you are not prepared to get your hands dirty & spend a half dozen weekends repairing things to get things back into proper working order, I'd recommend against buying ANY 100K mile BMW, period... Lots of folks driving around good looking older BMW's that run like absolute crap, I don't recommend following this trend... I you lack capable & competent tools, you'll be spending $300 - $500+ on this alone. There's a reason why LCI X5d's that originally sold for $65K - $70K+, are occasionally selling for $10K at only 6-7 years old... Earlier years (pre-LCI) are selling for sub $10K quite regularly from what I've seen, even with great maintenance records & reasonably low miles. Lots of higher priced ones being listed by misguided folks; they aren't selling very fast regardless of how much money was thrown at them to "fix them up"... 2013 V6 Toyota Camry's are selling for similar prices to 2012 - 2013 E70 35d's of similar mileage; there is a damn good reason why a $65K - $70K BMW has depreciated to the point of selling used for similar prices as a boring commodity commuter Toyota that sold for $25K - $30K when brand new off the lot...

Also, at 100K, this is where a lot of major items start to need replacement on all BMW's, hence why there are a whole lot of 2nd & 3rd owner 80K - 100K mile BMW's on the market for seemingly awesome prices... It's almost better to risk purchasing a well taken care of & loved 125K - 150K mile BMW that has already had all of the repairs done by the previous owner who's tired of getting nickel & dime'd by the dealership on an old car they're starting to lose love for...

I bought my one owner, super clean, 2013 X5d w/ 75K miles for about $1K above wholesale cost from a BMW dealership (who made a stupid deal on a trade-in)... Was perfectly "drivable" & in awesome condition for a 75K mile X5d, except for a bad HP EGR cooler that the dealership comically thought was a failing accelerator pedal that they replaced... I quickly showed the sales guy & their incompetent master tech that their throttle pedal "repair" didn't fix the "super scary & likely catastrophic" engine malfunction that they failed to tell me was previously occurring on this "Super clean, fully updated & inspected" X5d, which put the ball solely in my court for negotiations (it pays to know how the M57 engine operates before you buy & having a competent scan tool during the test drive, as almost all of them being dumped to dealerships have at least one hidden issue that is stupid expensive to repair at the dealership)

Besides the sporadic engine malfunction issue caused by a sticky HP EGR cooler bypass valve, my "pristine" condition, one owner 2013 X5d required / needed repairs & replacement of the following list if I didn't want to drive around in an annoying "all show, no go" pile of unreliable & unsafe junk within the next year. Definitely more than a few thousand dollars in just parts, where I did all of the labor myself (except for the brake flush & bleed, as well as tire mounting); however, not all of it is absolutely necessary if you're the type who doesn't care about driving car that doesn't work how it should, or likes to be surprised w/ expensive repairs. If this list of repairs was performed at the dealership, it would be tens of thousands of dollars...

- Water pump
- Thermostat
- Cooling system flush
- HP EGR Cooler
- PCV tube
- Glow Plugs & Controller
- Full vacuum system hose, hardlines, manifold, seals, brake booster check valve, & canister replacement due to vacuum system leaks causing sluggish engine performance
- All Vacuum solenoids & converters replaced
- Front torsion arms & front sway bar end-links
- Intake boost system gaskets & seals
- EGR valve & ASV cleaning
- Swirflap Cleaning
- Intake manifold cleaning & replacement gaskets
- 100K mile full brake service (Rotors, pads, clips, sensors, brake fluid flush & bleed)
- Full transmission service (solenoid replacement, seal tubes, mechatronics, bridge seal)
- Fuel Filter
- Intake Air-Filter
- Cabin Recirculation & Fresh Air Pollen Filters
- 105 AH AGM replacement battery
- Front left wheel bearing
- Transfer Case Fluid drain & refill
- Front & Rear Differential oil drain & refill
- Intake manifold pressure sensor replacement
- Exhaust Pressure Sensor Replacement
- Exhaust Pressure Sensor Hose replacement
- HP Turbo Oil Feed Cooling Line ("U" Shaped Line)
- Intake MAF Sensor
- Oil drain & fill plus filter
- Front Fender Turn Signals that like to leak in water & fail (can seal them back up if you catch the leak before things fail)
- New Summer Tires for my 19" rims
- Used 18" rims w/ new snow tires
- Used Comfort Access Handle
- Used Rear Bumper Aerial Antenna for Comfort Access

Still need to do / should do the following repairs for preventative maintenance to get my x5d to as near "new" condition as I'm willing to do on this car:

- Harmonic Damper
- Belts
- Belt Tensioner & Pulley
- Valve Cover Gaskets, as well as fuel injector seals
- Driveshaft Guibo / Flex disc
- Servotronic power steering servo motor (VERY common issue that most don't even realize has failed)
- HVAC auxiliary pump
- Motor mounts & transmission / transfer case mounts
- Oil cooler gasket
- Transmission oil cooler & thermostat
- Sonnex "Zip Kit" & separator plate to rebuild transmission valve body
- Transfer Case Worm Gear
- Delete & tune

The thing is, this list doesn't account for the random stuff that isn't common, but has been known to happen enough that one should be cognizant of the potential when buying an out of warranty high mileage E70 35d, such as:

- Transmission E-Clutch bushing seal failure requiring a rebuilt or used trans (becoming more commonly reported on the 6HPxx transmissions)
- Worn out transmission valve body causing poor shift quality & eventual internal transmission failure
- Failed differential(s)
- Leaking differential / transfer case seals
- Spun main or rod bearing
- SCR active tank sensor failure (temp & level sensors)
- SCR Catalyst failure
- NOx sensor failure
- Injector Failure
- Intake boost hose burst,
- Intercooler leaking
- Turbo Failure & associated oil cooling line replacement due to sludge buildup
- Adaptive Headlight Motor Failure
- Plugged up DPF causing high EGT's & poor engine performance
- Leaking DPF allowing soot to reach SCR cat, causing SCR Cat failure
- Random oil leaks from anywhere & everywhere (it's a BMW)
- Various suspension issues (especially w/ rear air-suspension if optioned)
- Sunroof becoming stuck
- Various electrical issues that are difficult / impossible to diagnose if you're not experienced in this type of stuff
- Water drain lines becoming clogged = Damaged electrical components / making your interior wet & smelly.
- Steering Angle Sensor Failure = Rip out the dashboard to replace
- Heater core, AC evap unit leaking = Rip out the dash to fix
- Leaking LCI model LED rear taillights = very expensive to replace
- One singular partial fill up with old water & algae contaminated diesel from some decrepit "Ma & Pa" gas station out in BFE = totaled vehicle if you're lucky enough to have insurance cover it...
- A low speed minor collision with a deer that should only cost $1.5-3K in purely cosmetic damage, will be estimated at $7K - $10K+ to fix (because it's a "Beemer"), where it'll be a total loss & your "pristine" condition X5d that you put several thousand dollars & a whole lot of time into fixing back up to damn near new condition, will be ACV'd (ie your settlement amount) around $9K - $12K, regardless of what prior condition it was, or how much money you've spent fixing it back up... I know from personal experience, as I'm on my 2nd x5d...

If you can get around all of the negative stuff, have the time & money to fix things (don't be naive, you will have to fix things), have the tools to do so yourself, are prepared to deal with the inherent risk of a high mileage out of warranty BMW, then you'd be quite a happy camper owning an X5d. There's a reason why the E70 subgroup on Bimmerfest is one of the most active, where a large part of this activity is from relatively happy, if not enthusiastic X5d owners. It's an awesome vehicle because of the M57 engine, & can actually be very reliable (according to BMW standards), ONLY IF you're prepared to do the work to make it so.

Last edited by SPL15; 09-22-2019 at 12:38 AM.
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  #42  
Old 09-22-2019, 12:37 AM
edycol edycol is online now
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Lol. Did you find yourself mint condition X5.
I put 425k km on 525d E61 with M57 single turbo engine in Europe. Changed one EGR, two water pumps and two thermostats. All as preventative.
But, do tell us about those horrible BMWs.


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  #43  
Old 09-22-2019, 12:59 AM
SPL15 SPL15 is offline
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Originally Posted by edycol View Post
Lol. Did you find yourself mint condition X5.
I put 425k km on 525d E61 with M57 single turbo engine in Europe. Changed one EGR, two water pumps and two thermostats. All as preventative.
But, do tell us about those horrible BMW's.


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Neat story... My E46 has 200K miles with only a power steering pump & new tires in the last 75K miles... This is equally as irrelevant as your 525d Euro spec M57 anecdote... Also, I had BBQ boneless chicken thighs for dinner & wore a hat. This is equally as irrelevant...

Never claimed my X5 was "Mint"; my post was stating quite the opposite & that most listings described as "mint", aren't... I could have easily gotten away with just replacing the HP EGR & the slightly noisy wheel bearing on my E70 35d, & then falsely bragged that my bargain 35d only needed a few minor repairs to be top notch reliable (as many do); however, I don't much like driving a car that doesn't perform how it should, hence all the rest of the repairs to fix things that weren't quite right / known to fail / causing slightly reduced engine performance from where it should be. I put up with BMW's maintenance costs & requirements of used high mileage samples, for the performance experience / other subjective intangibles I can enjoy at a fraction of MSRP. Kinda defeats this purpose if I only fix what absolutely has to be fixed in order to start the engine & make it to point A to point B...

I've had two E70 35d's... Similar experience & preventative repairs on both, albeit my 2012 was actually better taken care of. If you simply want a car that "runs", sure you can half-ass repair only the absolutely required items on a high-mileage BMW that is being dumped FOR A REASON; however, it's better to just buy a more reliable / durable car instead in my opinion

If BMW's trend of issues starting at 80K - 100K miles isn't true, I'm a bit confused on why there's so many posts across the entire internet from folks having fairly predictable issues occurring around this mileage? Also confusing for why BMW's depreciate so rapidly once they get to this mileage... Also confusing for why all of the BMW's I've owned, and the ones I still own, have had the same exact commonly reported issues that started at 80K - 100K miles, that everyone else states tends to occur around 80K - 100K miles... Confusing indeed...

Collective consensus & perception isn't a legitimate "proof" of truth; however, there's usually at least some amount of truth / wisdom to be gained from it... I may be way out on a limb here, but I'd speculate that the overwhelming majority of folks in the US who purchase a BMW, whether new or used, aren't buying for reasons of expecting 1990's Toyota & Honda long term reliability, durability, & low maintenance costs...

Last edited by SPL15; 09-22-2019 at 01:43 AM.
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  #44  
Old 09-22-2019, 08:12 AM
edycol edycol is online now
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xDrive35D Pitfalls?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPL15 View Post
Neat story... My E46 has 200K miles with only a power steering pump & new tires in the last 75K miles... This is equally as irrelevant as your 525d Euro spec M57 anecdote... Also, I had BBQ boneless chicken thighs for dinner & wore a hat. This is equally as irrelevant...

Never claimed my X5 was "Mint"; my post was stating quite the opposite & that most listings described as "mint", aren't... I could have easily gotten away with just replacing the HP EGR & the slightly noisy wheel bearing on my E70 35d, & then falsely bragged that my bargain 35d only needed a few minor repairs to be top notch reliable (as many do); however, I don't much like driving a car that doesn't perform how it should, hence all the rest of the repairs to fix things that weren't quite right / known to fail / causing slightly reduced engine performance from where it should be. I put up with BMW's maintenance costs & requirements of used high mileage samples, for the performance experience / other subjective intangibles I can enjoy at a fraction of MSRP. Kinda defeats this purpose if I only fix what absolutely has to be fixed in order to start the engine & make it to point A to point B...

I've had two E70 35d's... Similar experience & preventative repairs on both, albeit my 2012 was actually better taken care of. If you simply want a car that "runs", sure you can half-ass repair only the absolutely required items on a high-mileage BMW that is being dumped FOR A REASON; however, it's better to just buy a more reliable / durable car instead in my opinion

If BMW's trend of issues starting at 80K - 100K miles isn't true, I'm a bit confused on why there's so many posts across the entire internet from folks having fairly predictable issues occurring around this mileage? Also confusing for why BMW's depreciate so rapidly once they get to this mileage... Also confusing for why all of the BMW's I've owned, and the ones I still own, have had the same exact commonly reported issues that started at 80K - 100K miles, that everyone else states tends to occur around 80K - 100K miles... Confusing indeed...

Collective consensus & perception isn't a legitimate "proof" of truth; however, there's usually at least some amount of truth / wisdom to be gained from it... I may be way out on a limb here, but I'd speculate that the overwhelming majority of folks in the US who purchase a BMW, whether new or used, aren't buying for reasons of expecting 1990's Toyota & Honda long term reliability, durability, & low maintenance costs...


I had 2013 X5 35d here in the states. Had to change it for a minivan due to family expansion. Never had issues except dreaded SCR issues. However, that is not confined to X5. Same components are used by other manufacturers (exactly same). I have in Europe currently Toyota Prado 3.0 D-4D. You should see what kind of cluster**** is that.
Maintaining the value is based a lot on the perception. Many people who drive BMWs are buying it for show off, neglecting maintenance etc. Toyota in the last generation of Highlander AWD and Sienna AWD, as well as Lexus AWD with transverse engine, have transmission that literally cannot make 3k without major intervention. My best man has 2018 HL and was in service like 30 times bcs. Toyota doesnt want to admit issues on transmission. If they do, then they would have to issue recall, and people might think Toyota is not bulletproof. I told him: dude, you should get X5 from me, and he was: yeah, God knows what kind of issues I would have.
So, he basically has non-functioning HL, failed transmission and he still thinks it is better than BMW. Sad thing is, he could probably sell it for full value.

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Last edited by edycol; 09-22-2019 at 08:24 AM.
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  #45  
Old 09-22-2019, 08:22 AM
sunny_j's Avatar
sunny_j sunny_j is offline
bmw addiction
Location: Vancouver, Britsh Columbia
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,133
Mein Auto: X5d
I've owned my 2012 since it rolled off the showroom floor and now have 134,000km on her. I've done virtually the same services SPL15 has to his x5d. Are these expensive vehicles to maintain? Yes! If you learn to do the repairs yourself, you'll have a lot of money.

Here's a list of things of I've done once the warranty expired after 80,000km
Charge Pipe O Ring R&R
Water Pump & Thermostat R&R
Empty housing for heater/air condit.unit
Charcoal Cabin Filter R&R
Air Filter
Brake Fluid
Front & Rear Differential Fluids Labor
Transfer & Differential Fluid
Fuel Filter R&R
Drivers Air Bag Recall
EGR, DPF, SCR Delete & Tune
Air Intake Turbo Gasket
Emissions Delete Labor
Oil & Filter Change
Transmission Fluid & Seal Service Labor
Transmission Fluid & Seal Service
Coolant Flush
CCV Intake Hose R&R
Harminic Balacer, Serpintine & AC Belt Labor
Fluidampr, Belts & Vac Lines
Driver Side Intercooler Gasket
MAF Sensor
Vacuum Line and Electronic Vavle R&R
Oil Feed Line 2 & 4 Crush Washers
Powder Coat & Sand Blast Wheels
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Bolt & 2 Crush Washers
Alignment
Windshield Wiper Blade - Valeo
Injector 5&6 R&R
MAP Sensor & Grommet
Partitions
Left Front Turn Signal
Oil & Filter Change Labor
Oil & Mahle Filter
X5m Door Sills
X5m Roof Rails
Android Head Unit
Brake Fluid ATE BF1200 & Throttle Body Gasket
Osram Night Breakers
Ceramic Front Rear Pads
Zimmerman Rotors/Sensors Front Rear
ATM Charged Air Boost Hose
Idler Bolt Recall
BMW Air Filter - Mann
Exhaust Pressure Sensor, Exhaust Pipe & 2 Crush Washers
BRR Tune
Charcoal Cabin Air Filter Corteco
Engine Oil Filter Mahle
Fuel filter
Cabin Air Filter
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  #46  
Old 09-22-2019, 11:27 AM
edycol edycol is online now
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Location: Colorado Springs
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 4,858
Mein Auto: 328i xDrive 6MT
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunny_j View Post
I've owned my 2012 since it rolled off the showroom floor and now have 134,000km on her. I've done virtually the same services SPL15 has to his x5d. Are these expensive vehicles to maintain? Yes! If you learn to do the repairs yourself, you'll have a lot of money.

Here's a list of things of I've done once the warranty expired after 80,000km
Charge Pipe O Ring R&R
Water Pump & Thermostat R&R
Empty housing for heater/air condit.unit
Charcoal Cabin Filter R&R
Air Filter
Brake Fluid
Front & Rear Differential Fluids Labor
Transfer & Differential Fluid
Fuel Filter R&R
Drivers Air Bag Recall
EGR, DPF, SCR Delete & Tune
Air Intake Turbo Gasket
Emissions Delete Labor
Oil & Filter Change
Transmission Fluid & Seal Service Labor
Transmission Fluid & Seal Service
Coolant Flush
CCV Intake Hose R&R
Harminic Balacer, Serpintine & AC Belt Labor
Fluidampr, Belts & Vac Lines
Driver Side Intercooler Gasket
MAF Sensor
Vacuum Line and Electronic Vavle R&R
Oil Feed Line 2 & 4 Crush Washers
Powder Coat & Sand Blast Wheels
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Bolt & 2 Crush Washers
Alignment
Windshield Wiper Blade - Valeo
Injector 5&6 R&R
MAP Sensor & Grommet
Partitions
Left Front Turn Signal
Oil & Filter Change Labor
Oil & Mahle Filter
X5m Door Sills
X5m Roof Rails
Android Head Unit
Brake Fluid ATE BF1200 & Throttle Body Gasket
Osram Night Breakers
Ceramic Front Rear Pads
Zimmerman Rotors/Sensors Front Rear
ATM Charged Air Boost Hose
Idler Bolt Recall
BMW Air Filter - Mann
Exhaust Pressure Sensor, Exhaust Pipe & 2 Crush Washers
BRR Tune
Charcoal Cabin Air Filter Corteco
Engine Oil Filter Mahle
Fuel filter
Cabin Air Filter


How does regular maintenance falls into pitfalls? I have to change transmission fluid, filter, transfer case fluid, rear differential fluid in my Toyota Sienna next week. What does that mean?
If changing transmission fluid is an issue, there is always good Trek bike on sale.


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  #47  
Old 09-23-2019, 06:10 AM
NW-99SS NW-99SS is offline
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Location: Fort Kent - Alberta
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 59
Mein Auto: 2012 X5 35d
Quote:
Originally Posted by edycol View Post
And point is? What will happen to you turbo if EGT is higher? Enlighten us!


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What it means is that your EGTs may still be hot.

Your procedure is great, again I don't have an issue with it - the exception is that is it not a procedure available to most people. Most are driving around the city, or even if highway, end up in the city in stop light traffic. That's where monitoring your actual EGTs is beneficial.

To put it simply, following your cool down method, while also knowing your EGTs is the best case scenario.
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  #48  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:16 AM
edycol edycol is online now
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Location: Colorado Springs
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-99SS View Post
What it means is that your EGTs may still be hot.



Your procedure is great, again I don't have an issue with it - the exception is that is it not a procedure available to most people. Most are driving around the city, or even if highway, end up in the city in stop light traffic. That's where monitoring your actual EGTs is beneficial.



To put it simply, following your cool down method, while also knowing your EGTs is the best case scenario.


So what is excessive EGT?


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  #49  
Old 09-23-2019, 01:30 PM
NW-99SS NW-99SS is offline
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Location: Fort Kent - Alberta
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 59
Mein Auto: 2012 X5 35d
Quote:
Originally Posted by edycol View Post
So what is excessive EGT?


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For shutdown, rule of thumb is to shutdown around 300F, but I would say anything under 325 and you should be fine. 350F would be too high for my own vehicle.

For max power/boost - depends on the engine, but in most diesel applications, especially on a stock diesel, 1300 is quite high, with 1400 being the max I would want to see before reducing engine load and speed to bring the EGTs down.
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  #50  
Old 09-24-2019, 05:56 PM
edycol edycol is online now
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Location: Colorado Springs
 
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Mein Auto: 328i xDrive 6MT
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-99SS View Post
For shutdown, rule of thumb is to shutdown around 300F, but I would say anything under 325 and you should be fine. 350F would be too high for my own vehicle.



For max power/boost - depends on the engine, but in most diesel applications, especially on a stock diesel, 1300 is quite high, with 1400 being the max I would want to see before reducing engine load and speed to bring the EGTs down.


Lol. Whose rule of thumb? And what happens if it is 350f?


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