1998 528I Oil Filter Housing Gasket & “Freeze Plugs” Repair (E39) - Page 4 - Bimmerfest - BMW Forums



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  #76  
Old 04-25-2014, 04:57 PM
Yazied Yazied is offline
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Getting this tomorrow ! Wish me luck guys


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  #77  
Old 04-26-2014, 12:26 PM
Yazied Yazied is offline
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ID:	435884 I got lucky with those freeze plugs


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  #78  
Old 04-26-2014, 02:18 PM
Yazied Yazied is offline
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The whole job wasn't bad , 2.5 hours to complete the whole job including a 2 trips to autozone to get degreaser , the leak was very intense , Click image for larger version

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Hopefully this will do it for the leak , I didn't have a torque wrench so I snug the VANOS bolt tightly without over doing it and the same for the six bolts on the OHF ... Glad I got this done as I was worried the some oil might get on the exhaust manifold and catch on fire .. Thanks to this post that made the whole thing very easy .


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  #79  
Old 07-12-2014, 06:48 PM
MPDano MPDano is offline
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Thanks for this write up as there wasn't one for the X5. The only difference in instructions is there is a 13mm short bolt holding the PS Pump on the bottom (accessible from under car).

Since I've removed my Alternator plenty of times, the disassemble/assembly went quickly. I used black rtv to verify a good seal, I made sure to use only a very small bit. I also did an oil change and filter. I used a couple cans of engine degreaser to clean up my engine so I can troubleshoot easier. Took the X5 for a quick drive around the block and still got a leak. I am hoping it was just residual from the original leak since a lot of clear water also was draining out. This is from the water hose cleanup from the degreaser cleaning.

The oil spot on the ground looks dark so I am hoping this is the old oil that was sitting on the larger of the two pans. I probably should have left off the smaller front pan while I monitored the repair.
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  #80  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:27 AM
MPDano MPDano is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPDano View Post
Thanks for this write up as there wasn't one for the X5. The only difference in instructions is there is a 13mm short bolt holding the PS Pump on the bottom (accessible from under car).

Since I've removed my Alternator plenty of times, the disassemble/assembly went quickly. I used black rtv to verify a good seal, I made sure to use only a very small bit. I also did an oil change and filter. I used a couple cans of engine degreaser to clean up my engine so I can troubleshoot easier. Took the X5 for a quick drive around the block and still got a leak. I am hoping it was just residual from the original leak since a lot of clear water also was draining out. This is from the water hose cleanup from the degreaser cleaning.

The oil spot on the ground looks dark so I am hoping this is the old oil that was sitting on the larger of the two pans. I probably should have left off the smaller front pan while I monitored the repair.
So far so good. Got a drop or two which seems to be residual (hopefully) stuff. It's only been a couple days.
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  #81  
Old 08-06-2014, 11:30 AM
endgrain endgrain is offline
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Talking e36 Oil filter housing leak

Using your write-up I was able to repair my leaking welch plug(s) on the 97 328is with success. I did however deviate slightly from your process with the following changes.

1. Tapped the holes using a 7mm tap.
2. Cut the 7mm bolt down so that the washer would sit flush against the housing.
3. Cleaned the surface with emery cloth before applying gasket maker.
4. Used Permatex Ultra copper gasket maker.

Once I applied a liberal amount of gasket maker I immediately installed the washer and bolt. I let the application cure for 17 hours (had to have the car back on the road) and reassembled.

No leaks after 2000 miles!

Thanks for posting this ingenious under $20 repair (including new housing gasket)
  #82  
Old 08-07-2014, 07:28 PM
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dwonda dwonda is offline
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First of all, thank you for this fantastic idea!

I just did this to my car, and I feel I must voice some discrepancies, first of all the inner diameter of 5/16" is much too large for a 7mm bolt. Secondly, 6mm bolts don't work period. They slide right in and out of the holes before they are even tapped. 7mm bolts are the way to go, and I don't really understand using a 7mm bolt to tap a hole for a 6mm bolt anyways, if you use a 7mm bolt to tap, you are tapping for a 7mm bolt.
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  #83  
Old 12-18-2014, 05:06 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Good news from Poolman on the OFH gasket material change at BMW ...
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > Valve Cover Gaskets
Quote:
Originally Posted by poolman View Post
From what Ragaie told me, it's across the board,,all gaskets that come in contact with oil ,are now made from Vinton. That includes the OFH.
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  #84  
Old 12-26-2014, 05:02 PM
MJB9 MJB9 is offline
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Hi CN90. Thanks! I found this after leaving a post on another OFH thread you had. The one I followed elsewhere only mentioned the 6 bolts! I was trying to remove PS UNTIL I saw everything move. Yikes. I hope I didn't damage the rigid PS hoses by pump. Anyway, I am going to remove the bolts 7 and 8 now. However, did you have to support the PS pump or just let it hang?
  #85  
Old 12-27-2014, 10:52 AM
MJB9 MJB9 is offline
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Finished the OFH gasket R&R along with my 2nd CCV R&R.

Couple of things along the way (pics to follow):

1. CCV was much easier the 2nd time around by removing the OFH. However, if you don't need the OFH, I don't know if I'd do it again--just because. It's a lot of work.
2. Alternator re-install was harder than the CCV (to me). Darn bolts were difficult to line up. ONe would, one wouldn't and vice versa
3. There was a radiator hose connected (clamp/screw) to my OFH near the PS that had to be undone before I could remove the OFH.
4. I got a code P0198 (oil temp sensor - high circuit) up starting up for first time. Not sure if because I did so much at once and oil was low maybe, initially. I reset it and let it run 10 minutes and no code, but have not driven it yet.
5. Car ran a little rough at first. Could be because I cleaned out the ICV and maybe there was some brake cleaner in it still. Still need to take for a ride.
6. Noticed a LOT of caked oil on CCV at top and bottom of vent pipe (that connects to the VC). This is the one generic (URO) part I had from previous CCV install (rest was OEM BMW). I believe it was leaking at the VC connection and dripped down to the bottom part of the banjo connector (other end of Vanos). I could have a bad banjos connector too. I noticed it swiveled freely--not sure if that's normal?
7. There was a LOT of debris in the intake to the alternator (vents and all the way up to/inside the alternator (took a while to clean out).
8. For me, it was easiest to hook up the swivel pipe to the CCV first (there are 2 snap-on connections and one swivel--the swivel one is what I'm referring to). With that one done first, the snap-on ones are much easier to work with.
9. Had to replace the hose clamps on PS reservoir as it was dripping ( I used crimp on connectors )
10. I noticed that my PS reservoir cap was missing the oring and now explains why the mess every week or so caked on. Not sure when it was lost, if on there at all. Been doing that from when I first got the ZF reservoir. for reference for others if they need to get one 32411128333 http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts...22&hg=32&fg=20

I did a lot of maintenance along the way; anything I touched I did some preventive maint on it.
  #86  
Old 12-27-2014, 01:25 PM
MJB9 MJB9 is offline
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UPDATE. Was loose connection on the Oil Pressure sensor (but odd that it threw an oil temp sensor code P0198)?
  #87  
Old 04-23-2015, 07:34 PM
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MUSCLEBOY MUSCLEBOY is offline
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The top left bolt, or the longest one for that matter of the six that screw the oil filter housing into the block striped while trying to tighten...i did not even tighten too much or maybe i did. The other five are torqued at 22NM and are tight. What can i do about the one bolt that is now stripped and will not grab in the top left position, or the longest one for that matter? . I took off the aluminum shaving on that bottom half that was around the thread. Please help? Should i get a larger bolt of the same length and screw it in? Help. Help.
  #88  
Old 04-23-2015, 08:01 PM
MJB9 MJB9 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUSCLEBOY View Post
The top left bolt, or the longest one for that matter of the six that screw the oil filter housing into the block striped while trying to tighten...i did not even tighten too much or maybe i did. The other five are torqued at 22NM and are tight. What can i do about the one bolt that is now stripped and will not grab in the top left position, or the longest one for that matter? . I took off the aluminum shaving on that bottom half that was around the thread. Please help? Should i get a larger bolt of the same length and screw it in? Help. Help.
Helicoil 5543-10 M10 x 1.25 Metric Fine Thread Repair Kit https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002SRG34/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_VmAovb1J3GFV4
  #89  
Old 04-24-2015, 07:18 AM
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MUSCLEBOY MUSCLEBOY is offline
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Smile

Thank you for the website and tool suggestion mjbennet...Val.
  #90  
Old 04-24-2015, 08:05 AM
MJB9 MJB9 is offline
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im not sure on exact thread size etc but there are similar products.
  #91  
Old 06-14-2015, 02:47 PM
cn90 cn90 is offline
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Some interesting tricks to prevent leak during install.

Thanks to Jason5driver for heads-up on how to prevent bolt galling.

Just did my 2006 X5 3.0i M54 OFH gasket.

1- The oil leak helps prevent bolt galling LOL.

2- I tightened the bolt a tiny bit to hopefully prevent galling LOL, then undo the bolts slowly, a bit at a time.
Fortunately, no galling for me.

3- Bolts #1, #2, #3, #4 are responsible for holding the gasket down.
Bolts #5-#6 for structural support, mostly for the PS Pump.
I was lazy, so I did not undo the PS Pump bolts, I left the OFH in place and simply replaced the gasket.
Again, use only BMW gasket, only $5 or so.

4- Now this is the trick and I verified with the seasoned BMw mechanic.
Torque the bolts slowly in criss-cross pattern.

Bolts #1, #2, #3, #4 are tricky. Once they are torqued down, the gasket is slowly squeezed into place.
Wait 5 min, gently torque Bolts #1, #2, #3, #4 down again.
Do this for about 3 cycles, the bolts should bottom out soon.
Do NOT strip the threads, it is aluminum engine block!

People who have oil leak after OFH Gasket: this is because they torque Bolts #1, #2, #3, #4 only once!
Remember the gasket is like rubber, it is deformed as you squeeze it.
Once the 2 mating surfaces (the OFH and the engine) are touching each other, you are good.
  #92  
Old 01-09-2016, 10:07 AM
BMW4RE BMW4RE is offline
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I just did this job on my '98 528i. I wish I had known about it back about 5 years ago (but only around 10k miles.), when I rebuilt my Vanos, and had my intake manifold off for another job. I looked at a picture I took of my engine (see image) with the intake manifold removed, and there was obvious evidence of the leak at that time.

Yes, it would be simpler if I had the back of a twenty-year-old, but alas... Like others who have done this job, I found one of the frustrating parts of it to be the alternator. I used the big pry-bar to get it out the first time, but it was still a bit of a swine to get out. Before reassembling, I saw a post somewhere, where they mentioned adjusting the depth of the nut in the bottom bracket of the alternator before installing. Unfortunately, I didn't bookmark the page so I couldn't find it to verify the technique. Eventually I found a video on that big video site that constantly finds ways to "disallow" me to watch their videos without my allowing them newer varieties of intrusion. But that's another rant for another story.

I was able to glean just enough from the video to reinforce the technique that I'd read about earlier. This is after I levered the alternator out for the second time, as the best I could get the lower alternator hole aligned was "almost". The bottom-line is: I'd recommend adjusting that nut depth before attempting to line up the alternator holes. I'd also recommend removing the plastic cover from the back of the alternator, as it allows for freer movement while maneuvering it into place with the plastic cooling duct not working against you. (Although, be a bit more cautious, as there are more parts to break exposed.)

To adjust the nut, I sprayed a bit of PB Blaster on both sides, as it showed some rust that was probably going to make it more of a fight. I threaded the longer (top) bolt into the nut, from the front, and set the flange on a 2x4, with a flare-nut wrench between the 2x4 and the case so there was a bit of a recess for the nut to drop. I then gave the bolt a few pretty good smacks with a fair-sized ball-pein. Eventually, I saw a bit of movement, then it became easier. Soon the nut was flush on the inside of the housing flange. After that it was a fairly easy install. Of course setting the belt back in place wasn't a walk in the park, but that's only because I did the job without removing the fan, fan-shroud, or radiator hose. If I had it to do over again (Which I might, but fingers crossed.), I'd probably do it the same way.

Note: I used Victor Reinz gasket for the job. I also changed the Vanos oil-line, using a Continental-brand hose (evidence of seepage), with new copper (rather than aluminum) sealing washers. I also re-torqued the OFH bolts to approximately 16 ft. lbs., 2-3 times, using 1/2" beam-torque type wrench. I even gave them an extra try when I removed the alternator the second time to adjust the nut. The bolts felt like they may have bottomed-out at about that torque. Again, fingers crossed, as this leak has gone on for too long.

Key Points:
  1. I did the job w/o removing shroud, fan, or radiator hose, so it is possible on '99 528i.
  2. Take the time to adjust the stubborn nut at the alternator flange.
  3. Consider removing plastic cover on alternator before setting back in place.
  4. Many thanks to the OP, for the write-up, as well as to those who added commentary..
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  #93  
Old 07-21-2016, 10:49 AM
dvdlkd dvdlkd is offline
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Two things to consider if you are taking this job on yourself:
1) This job can be done without removing the fan. You spend more time getting the alternator/tensioner bolt out and slipping through the fan blades. But I preferred this to taking the fan and shroud out. Actually threading the fan back on is a royal PIA for me for the 3-4 times I have done that. You could try getting that bolt out and pull the fan if you just can't make it work.
2) Be careful getting your OFH bolts out and in. Your block is aluminum and there are threads on this forum where folks have stripped one or more of the bolt holes on the block.
  #94  
Old 01-03-2017, 08:37 AM
rswapp rswapp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cn90 View Post
DIY: 1998 528I Oil Filter Housing Gasket & "Freeze Plugs" Repair

- I have what seems to be an oil leak along the Oil Pan Gasket. To replace the Oil Pan Gasket, it is a massive job on the 6-cylinder engine!!! So I went to the BWM dealer and they say that they virtually never sell an Oil Pan Gasket!
But they fix quite a bit of Oil Filter Housing Gasket, actually they have a whole bunch of these gaskets in stock!

- I did a little more research and apparently the Oil Pan Gasket is made out of some very tough material with a steel re-enforcement and should last into 180-200K miles. So I figure out common things are common and rare things are rare!

- As it turns out, I have leak at both Oil Filter Housing Gasket and "Freeze Plugs". It is an easy DIY, roughly 3-4h job.

- To my pleasant surprise, I have no more oil leak after one week, so those who think you have a leak at Oil Pan Gasket, think again, it is likely the Oil Filter Housing Gasket and "Freeze Plugs" Leak!!!

* The issue of "Freeze Plugs" leak was discussed here:
https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho....php?p=4701933
Instead of removing the "Freeze Plugs" and tap threads for an "NPT Thread" Plug, I decided to use an M7 bolts + washer for repair, and it works great (see below).

To check for a Freeze Plug Leak, use a mirror and flashlight:



* Info on drive belt layout and belt tensioner (32-mm thin wrench for Fan Clutch Nut and 5/16" Allen wrench for tensioner):
http://www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/199986

* Info on how to remove Air Filter Housing is part of my DIY for ICV, CCV etc.:
https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=379225

NOTE:
- Check realoem.com for your PN.
- Check your belt layout and make a diagram before taking it off.
- The PN for my 1998 528I Oil Filter Housing Gasket is 11421719855 ($5.00 at BMW dealer).
- Observe Torque Values (look it up) for different bolts.
M8 bolts = 22 Nm (Oil Filter Housing)
M10 bolts = 33 Nm


---------------------------------------
PART I: OIL FILTER HOUSING, ALTERNATOR REMOVAL

1. Disconnect Battery Positive Terminal in the trunk (10-mm wrench, be careful not to short with the ground bar!)

2. Remove Fan Clutch: 32-mm wrench. Note it is REVERSE thread!
During re-installation if you have difficult threading the Fan Clutch Nut back on the Water Pump bolt, you can use my "Poultry Cord" trick:
https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho....php?p=2758628

Use 5/16" Allen wrench for tensioner to remove belt.

3. Disconnect the DSC System Connector.

4. Remove the Air Filter Housing/Air Mass Meter as a Unit. Remove the 10-mm bolt and clamps and wiggle the whole thing out watching not to damage the Intake Rubber Elbow.

5. Remove the 13-mm Bolts the PS Reservoir and set it aside:



6. Alternator is mounted by two (2) 16-mm bolts. The UPPER Bolt holds the Pulley.
The positive cable connection is a 13-mm Nut.
- D/C connector
- D/C Cooling Air Intake
- Then Alternator comes out (It swivels on the LOWER bolt).
- During re-installation, use a smaller rod or screwdriver to help guide the Alternator back on the slot.



7. To remove the Oil Filter Housing:
- Disconnect VANOS Banjo-style Oil Line attachment to the VANOS using 19-mm wrench.
Do NOT lose the 2 aluminum washers, I re-use these washers. Torque for this 19-mm Banjo Bolts: 32 Nm.
- Optional: Remove Tensioner (Yellow Arrows) using 13-mm sockets. You don't have to do this step as it can be left attached to the O.F. Housing.
- The O.F. Housing is held by a total of 8 bolts.
- The six (6) 13-mm bolts have different lengths: mark them #1-6 to avoid confusion. In the event that you forgot to mark them, no worry, I laid them out in order as shown.
- Remove two (2) 13-mm bolts (# 7-8) on top of the PS Pump.



8. Now the O.F. Housing comes out easily. Remove old gasket and clean the mating surfaces to make sure it is spotless for re-installation.

9. If you decide to de-grease this area, go slowly!!! Stuff a rag inside the Engine Housing to prevent dirt or water from coming in. Avoid garden hose or pressure washer for obvious reasons!!!
- Wipe it clean with a rag and Q-tips so no oil is left behind.



10. Have a look at the O.F. Housing:
- Note the Oil Pressure Sensor on the back side.
- Note the Engine Oil Anti-Drain Back Valve.
- When installing new gasket, I use a thin smear of grease to seal any imperfection (this is just my way, you don't have to do it).
- Check both the mating surfaces to be sure it is spotless before re-installation:



- The Gasket barely sticks out (maybe 0.2 mm), so avoid using additional gasket maker here because it can potentially affect the Factory Gasket sealing:



Re-installation:
- Straightforward.
- Note all connectors and re-install them.
- Watch torque values.
- Wipe all oil leak in engine compartment and along oil pan gasket area so you can monitor these areas later.
- Re-connect Battery Positive Terminal.
- Start engine and check for any oil leaks at Housing or Banjo connection.

Congrats, you just spent $5.00 and saved some 4h of labor charge at dealer or indy! Now let's move on to fixing the Oil Filter Housing Leak itself.

---------------------------------------
PART II: OIL FILTER HOUSING "FREEZE PLUGS" LEAK REPAIR

- After the following repair of "Freeze Plug" Leak, my car is bone dry, not a single drop of oil leak!

Parts List (All of these can be obtained at Ace Hardware Store) for about $12.00:
- Stainless Steel M7 x 10 mm bolts; qty = 2.
- Optional: M6 x 10 mm bolts; qty = 2 for "dry fit".
- Stainless Steel Washers O.D. = 1-1/4"; I.D. = 5/16" (5/16" = 8 mm to accept the 7 mm bolt).
- Red LocTite, small tube
- Permatex Black RTV Gasket Maker
- Roofing Black Asphalt Caulk




- The "Freeze Plugs" are actually not "Freeze Plugs" but basically Welch Plugs that are stake-punched in from factory to close off holes from casting. It should have been plugged with bolts and washer (later models use bolts and washers). But this design of "Freeze Plugs" is known to cause oil leak in different BMW models.
- A new O.F. Housing is $330!!!
- The leak from my "Freeze Plugs" is about 4-5 drops on the driveway every night. But there is more leak than that (oil blown off on the road and collecting under the oil sump).

1. The hole in the "Freeze Plugs" is made from Aluminum and has a diameter of 6 mm and the M7 bolt fits perfectly.
- Do a search on tap and die of bolts and nuts, but as a rule, the hole to be threaded is always a bit smaller than the new bolt. This is because the M7 bolt has a diameter of 7 mm measured at the tip of the pitches but the measurement at the valley of the pitches is about 6 mm.
- To tap new threads, you can use a tap and die set but if you don't have a tap/die set, no problems. Use the M7 bolt to tap it with 1/4" ratchet. Keep steady pressure and maintain perpendicular path. The bolt is Stainless Steel and the Plug is Aluminum, so the bolts makes new threads with no problem (this is what I did).
- Tap a few turns at a time while removing the metal fragments. The hole is about 5 mm deep.
- Clean the hole from any debris:



2. Now use the smaller M6 x 10 mm bolt to make sure it fits nicely. The idea is: the washer should be 1mm from the housing. This is because this space will be occupied by Permatex RTV Gasket Maker, which will cure into a rubber-like material:



3. Now fit the washer and the M7 x 10 mm bolt as a "dry run". When the bolt is completely in, you should see a 1mm gap between the washer and the housing. Do NOT over-torque this M7 bolt, very easy to strip it!
- Now, remove the bolt and washer and proceed with the sealing job.

4. Apply Roofing Black Asphalt Caulk at the edges. This is where the oil leak happens. The Black Asphalt Caulk will seal it nicely and has a wide range of temp tolerance.

5. Now apply Permatex RTV Gasket Maker as shown, leaving the hole alone. Use Q-tips to clean the hole:



6. Place washer then rotate it a bit to spread the RTV sealant. The Permatex procedure calls for letting the sealant cure for about 2h before tightening the bolt. However I install the bolt right away, read on…............

7. The M7 x 10 mm bolt: apply a drop of LocTite on the thread and a very small drop of RTV sealant near the bolt's head. Again, use 1/4" ratchet and do NOT over-torque this M7 bolt, very easy to strip it!

8. When the bolt is fully seated, you should be able to rotate the washer because there is 1 mm gap filled with RTV sealant (but after 24h of cure, the RTV sealant will be rubberized and you should not be able to rotate the washer).
- Clean excess RTV Sealant. This is what it looks like prior to re-install:



9. The key thing: you can install everything back in the car but don't start the engine until 24h later to allow the RTV Sealant 24h to completely cure.

Congrats, you just fixed the most difficult problems of Oil Leak from "Freeze Plugs" faced by many BMW drivers for $12.00!


---
Instead of using a standard tap use a bottoming tap, a bottoming tap won't have the tapered point on the tap.
  #95  
Old 01-03-2017, 08:42 AM
rswapp rswapp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cn90 View Post
#1. I was just being an*l/paranoid by using roofing caulk...LOL. I used both roofing caulk (because that stuff hardens up when cured) and RTV sealant, but I guess you can use RTV sealant ALONE.

#2. I started a thread on "Oil Filter HOUSING: Additional Blue RTV Sealant?" here FYI. The concensus is no need for RTV. However, if you carefully apply a very thin bead as shown in Blue, you may be OK. If you do so, then read the RTV package instruction, apply the seal as shwon in BLUE, then let it sit alone for 1-2h until it feels like rubber, then install the Housing back in the engine.
You may want to post a F/U info in this thread whether your technique works or not:
https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...rtv+additional



My 2 cents: Nothing lasts forever, most car mfg rubber gaskets fail around 80-100K miles anyway. If the OEM gasket lasts 80K miles, then it is fine, if I keep the car another 80K, then I will redo the gasket then.
No on applying rtv in that area, you don't want any hint of rtv to get into the oil passage, this will surely "f" things up. Just rely on the OEM gasket.
  #96  
Old 08-17-2017, 11:28 AM
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azteca azteca is offline
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Question

Great Post! Thanks for sharing...

Does 2001 530iA have the same type plug?
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  #97  
Old 11-20-2019, 09:59 PM
Bmwe39528i Bmwe39528i is offline
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Very nice write up. I took apart mine after 200 000km, no signs of leakage.
  #98  
Old 11-20-2019, 10:01 PM
Bmwe39528i Bmwe39528i is offline
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Plugs surprisingly bone dry
 

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