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X5 G05 (2018 - Current)
G05 BMW X5 produced between 2018 to Current. Discuss the G05 X5 with other BMW owners here.

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  #1  
Old 03-23-2020, 07:35 PM
WBisel WBisel is offline
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Mein Auto: X5 40i
Tire Size Question

Hi All,

I have a 2020 X5 xdrive 40i. The current tires are Bridgestones 275/45-20 run flats on all four wheels.

I really do not like the run flats. To that end, I ordered the X5 with the optional spare tire (which BTW is a bargain when you order from factory). I intend to replace the run flats with standard tires and have a question for you all.

First, info I have been able to find says that the BMW wheels can accept standard tires just fine. So, there is not problem on that front.

I have seen a couple of different options for the tires ...
  1. 275/45-20 all four wheels
  2. 275/45-20 on front and 305/40-20 on rear.

The wheels are stock 20" wheels. BMW calls them 20" V-Spoke wheels. Not sure the width ... I believe it is 9" wide.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Steve
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  #2  
Old 03-24-2020, 07:24 PM
jadnashuanh jadnashuanh is offline
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Check www.realoem.com. My guess is that the rear wheels are wider to accept the wider tires. FWIW, I didn't see that tire size option listed for any of the X5 models.
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  #3  
Old 03-24-2020, 07:54 PM
WBisel WBisel is offline
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Mein Auto: X5 40i
On the 2020 X5 it is not an option. But in prior years I believe it was. If you go to sites like Discount Tire or Tire Rack, and then select the X5 xdrive 40i as the model car, it comes up as an option for tire sizes. In Tire Rack for example, if you click on "Optional Tire Sizes" ...
  • 4x - 265/50-19
  • front 265/50-19; rear 295/45-19
  • 4x 275/45-20 (this is mine)
  • front 275/45-20; rear 305/40-20
  • 4x 275/40/21

I don't know that there would any difference in handling, etc to have rear tires wider than front, and then there is the disadvantage of not being able to rotate tires. But, it does look cool.

Steve
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Old 03-24-2020, 08:00 PM
WBisel WBisel is offline
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Location: Arizona
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 24
Mein Auto: X5 40i
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadnashuanh View Post
Check www.realoem.com. My guess is that the rear wheels are wider to accept the wider tires. FWIW, I didn't see that tire size option listed for any of the X5 models.
I checked that link for BMW parts for wheels and 9" wide wheels are listed for the 20" diameter and also 10.5" wide wheels for the rear axle. Not clear which ones on my X5, but I expect that all four are 9.5" wide as four tires are same size.

So still not sure if one can put 305mm wide tires on 9" wide wheels

Steve
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  #5  
Old 03-24-2020, 08:03 PM
Autoputzer Autoputzer is offline
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Mein Auto: 2014 535i + 2018 X3 30i
Google "2020 BMW G05 X5 ordering guide."

The ordering guide shows two 20" wheels, both 20" x 9" with 275/45-20 tires.

305/40-20 seems to be a size used on a Porsche Cayenne. Looking on TireRack.com, there's a very limited selection, mostly either summer or winter tires. The couple of those tires I looked at required a 10" to 12" wide rim in that size.

By sticking to the same size tires all around, you would be able to rotate them and get some extra miles out of a set of tires.

Front and rear tire wear rates are more similar with xDrive than sDrive. The rear tire wear rate on my 535i is about 50% more than the front tire wear rate. But, on Frau Putzer's X3 xDrive 30i, the rear tire wear rate is only about 25% more than the front tire wear rate. By rotating the tires, you can have them wear down evenly. Having the same rolling diameter front and back also prevents a steady grind on the clutches in the xDrive's transfer case. That staggered set-up you mentioned has a 0.15" smaller rear rolling diameter than the front when new, and that would increase as the rear tires wear down faster.

The all-season tires on BMW SUV's are relatively wide for the rims. That's good, because when Muffy the soccer mom rubs a curb she scuffs the tire instead of scraping the rim. But, that makes up-sizing the tires without changing the rims a problem.

I think you're running into "If it ain't broke, don't fix (break) it."

If you're leasing your X5, you'll have to turn it in with run-flats since it came with run-flats. You'll also have to have 4/32" of remaining tread to avoid an excess tire wear fee. A lot of people who lease BMW's take the OE run-flats off, install non-run-flats, and then put the run-flats back on for lease turn-in.
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Old 03-24-2020, 08:08 PM
WBisel WBisel is offline
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Location: Arizona
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
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Mein Auto: X5 40i
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autoputzer View Post
Google "2020 BMW G05 X5 ordering guide."

The ordering guide shows two 20" wheels, both 20" x 9" with 275/45-20 tires.

305/40-20 seems to be a size used on a Porsche Cayenne. Looking on TireRack.com, there's a very limited selection, mostly either summer or winter tires. The couple of those tires I looked at required a 10" to 12" wide rim in that size.

By sticking to the same size tires all around, you would be able to rotate them and get some extra miles out of a set of tires.

Front and rear tire wear rates are more similar with xDrive than sDrive. The rear tire wear rate on my 535i is about 50% more than the front tire wear rate. But, on Frau Putzer's X3 xDrive 30i, the rear tire wear rate is only about 25% more than the front tire wear rate. By rotating the tires, you can have them wear down evenly. Having the same rolling diameter front and back also prevents a steady grind on the clutches in the xDrive's transfer case. That staggered set-up you mentioned has a 0.15" smaller rear rolling diameter than the front when new, and that would increase as the rear tires wear down faster.

The all-season tires on BMW SUV's are relatively wide for the rims. That's good, because when Muffy the soccer mom rubs a curb she scuffs the tire instead of scraping the rim. But, that makes up-sizing the tires without changing the rims a problem.

I think you're running into "If it ain't broke, don't fix (break) it."

If you're leasing your X5, you'll have to turn it in with run-flats since it came with run-flats. You'll also have to have 4/32" of remaining tread to avoid an excess tire wear fee. A lot of people who lease BMW's take the OE run-flats off, install non-run-flats, and then put the run-flats back on for lease turn-in.
I've come to same conclusion as far as replacement tires ... i.e., stay with 4 tires, 275/45-20 but I will go with standard tires and not the run flats, which I hate.

Steve
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  #7  
Old 03-24-2020, 08:15 PM
Autoputzer Autoputzer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WBisel View Post
I've come to same conclusion as far as replacement tires ... i.e., stay with 4 tires, 275/45-20 but I will go with standard tires and not the run flats, which I hate.

Steve
I tolerated the RFT's on my 535i for 31k miles. The non-RFT's improved the ride so much that I wish I'd swapped them out at 31 miles. Fortunately, the G01 X3 30i offered non-RFT all-season tires as an option, and with non-RFT's the spare is free.

We balked at getting an F25 X3 because it didn't offer non-RFT's or a spare. If the G01 didn't offer a spare, we would have bought an Audi and sent a picture of it and our previous three BMW's to BMW NA. But, BMW's adding spares to most of their cars and SUV's as they redesign them.

Non-RFT's tend to last longer, too. The spec'd tire pressures for BMW's are lower than what is ideal for even tire wear. I've dialed in my pressures for even wear. The X3's door jamb decal says 32 PSI in the front and 35 PSI in the rear. But, the ideal pressures for even wear seems to be about four PSI over those. But, with non-RFT's the ride is still acceptable. We should get at least 55k miles out of the OE tires.

Last edited by Autoputzer; 03-24-2020 at 08:19 PM.
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  #8  
Old 03-26-2020, 09:44 AM
jadnashuanh jadnashuanh is offline
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There's a potential 'suitable' option to a RFT that still offers at least some 'protection'. I know that Michelin makes what they call run-on-flat tires. Unlike a RFT which is 'guaranteed' to go 50-miles while flat at a specified speed up to the full GVW of the vehicle, a ROF tire's distance traveled is based on what the gross vehicle weight is while it is happening. As a result, they tend to be a bit more compliant. SItting in there alone, and you should get at least that 50-miles...have the family and luggage, and it will be less, but still allow you to get off the road to a safe place, and park it, or maybe get home.
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