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Old 01-12-2020, 01:11 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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2012 X5 Diesel (x5d) New Owner Experience & Tips

I'm going on three months now with a 2012 X5d. I’m at 101k mikes. It has the rear air suspension, regular steering, no adaptive drive, but has the comfort seats and 4 zone climate and some other minor goodies. It’s blue on tan, which is ok, but not my favorite. The tan shows a lot of dirt. I do like the weather tech floor mats in place of the tan carpet mats. The paint is ok; needs a correction in the summer. Most of the suspension rubber parts are ok. The sway links will need replacement in a couple years due to pretty cracked boots. The previous owner just had both DEF tanks replaced under warrantee, in addition to having the deflection pulley recall performed. Most of the rubber trim is ok and will get some gummi love, soon. Anyway, I thought I would give new owners a summary of what I've had to do and add in some tips from my perspective.

Thank you to all the contributors on this and other forums for all you insights!

I bought the vehicle with a check engine light for a discount. There were a ton of codes. The previous owner had a dealer estimate of 7 G’s to fix most everything, but not the thermostat, which had been missed in the diagnosis.

The main problems:

-The Low pressure EGR valve was not working: I cut the vacuum line at the top of the engine between the LPEGR mechanical actuator and the pressure converter (electronic valve that modulates vacuum to the actuator) and used the ISTA pressure converter test and a vacuum gauge to confirm vacuum control. The vacuum pressure converter was toast- so removed the intake and replaced the pressure converter, along with all the vacuum lines under the intake, plus the glow plugs and glow plug module. I put fiberglass heat tubing over all the new vacuum lines. Thanks to BMW for placing the pressure converter under the intake manifold! The vacuum lines under the manifold were baked pretty good. Then I used GM style plastic wiring loom in areas of high abrasion. In those areas the old hoses had worn through about half way into the tubing wall. Moral of the story: check vacuum lines first. Most of the problems on my German cars have been vacuum related.

-Glow plugs and the glow plug module were shot: replaced them all when the intake was off. Don't snap off the glow plug tops on removal. Use WD40 or something and let it soak for 10 minutes if they won't budge- super bummer if you snap them off! Also, use a good torque wrench that is the correct size to torque them down. It's not a lot of torque. Don't use a huge torque wrench on the lowest setting where it's not accurate. Experts, do what you do!

-Intake removal wasn’t too bad: There are some good videos out there, especially by Tunemyeuro. Upon removal I did a little carbon build up removal, but my X5 didn’t have a lot. It had maybe a mm coating on the intake manifold, but there were some clumps on the manifold to block transition. The intake valves probably had some clumps. Anyway, it wasn’t enough to justify walnut blasting. This X5 had used the BMW LL04 oil while in warrantee, but there was a jiffy lube sticker on the front window, probably from after scheduled maintenance ran out. I doubt Jiffy Lube had LL04 oil- most likely used some cheap big truck “diesel” oil. I scraped off the bits around the block intake ports and doused the intake ports and valves with EGR cleaner, let it sit, then sucked out all the excess fluid from each cylinder using my fluid extractor while the glow plugs were out. I also scraped and doused the HP EGR valve and sprayed inside the intake manifold. The HP EGR had a good caking. I also sprayed down into the HP EGR cooler and did an oil change soon after I got the X5 running. Oh, and I cleaned the swirl flap system which was marginally gunked up. After reading about Seafoam and all these other DPF/EGR cleaners, they all seem to work by lowering the burning temperature of carbon. Most likely they are all similar. I’m curious how well all these chemicals work and will take a note the next time I can inspect the areas I treated. I also continued to replace vacuum lines as I worked.

Tip- as you reinstalling the intake manifold, be careful that the round seals don’t fall off the intake manifold and go into the engine intake ports. One of mine fell off and I was freaking out to find it. Somehow it came to rest on top of the engine bell housing, thank god. If you can’t find it, better ensure the intake tracks are clear! Maybe a dab of rtv to keep them set in the intake manifold is a good idea. Also, cover the engine intake ports with tape while you are working.

-High Pressure EGR cooler was complaining: the coil return spring for the HPEGR cooler shutoff flap was broken. ****. As a stop-gap, I used a linear spring from ACE Hardware hooked professionally to the chassis. I might actually leave it- should never break. I suspect the coil spring on a new EGR cooler will snap again because it sucks. In the process, I replaced more vacuum hoses and covered with fiberglass heat sleeve and plastic loom.

-Engine thermostat: a broken engine thermostat usually kills the glow plug system because the glow plugs are deactivated by normal coolant temperature and the thermostat breaks open. If the thermostat isn’t working properly, the glow plug system stays on all the time. My 2005 Chevy Astro van told me when the thermostat was broken, but not the BMW X5d! There are lots of DIYs for this job. All is well now.

-Water pump & transmission thermostat: since I had to crack the cooling system for the thermostat I replaced the water pump and transmission thermostat, plus swapped in new coolant. I put the front wheels on ramps and used one of those funnels that you keep full to burp my baby- also cranked the front and rear heat during the process. There are DIY procedures all over the internet for this.

-CCV Hose: As I was replacing vacuum lines I noticed the intake CCV hose had a tear in it. It seems the originals get baked pretty good and crack over time. I used a replacement from TunemyEuro: CCV Hose and it seems like a good part. The owner warrantees it for life.

Additional work:

-Transmission flush & mechatronic sleeve/seal replacement: My transmission wasn't acting weird or bad, but it wasn't perfect, either. Based on my experience, it seemed like the fluid could use a replacement. Plus, lots of forum posts recommend it by at least 100km or 8 years. I decided to do a full 10L replacement by pumping out the torque converter using the the transmission cooler return line. Wear old clothes and use floor protection if you care because you will get wet.

This is the best general overview, in my opinion:

The CTSC Mechatronic Replacement Hints

Removing the transmission pan wasn't too bad using the shortened T40 bit with 1/4 wrench method- just took time. I might try lifting up the transfer case a bit if I was to do it again. There was not an obscene amount of metal on the pan magnets, so that was good. At least it didn't seem bad. Maybe a 1 or 2mm coating. Seemed acceptable.

Page 3 of the referenced guide looked different compared to what I saw. My vehicle has the 6HP28X (verified on the casting) and I used a hex bolt between the lever stop and lever arm to put the emergency release fork in a vertical position, which makes putting the mechatronics unit back on a little easier. You need to put the “fork” back into the mechatronics actuator arm. It’s shown in the guide on page 6.

Disconnect the transmission wiring connector and pull the wiring connector sleeve out, then unbolt the mechatronics unit, otherwise the sleeve holds the mechatronic unit in place. I guess you could pull the mechatronics unit horizontally off at that point, but the parts are plastic and it’s not work risking it. I just loosely re-secured the mechatronics unit with bolts 1 and 4, then removed the sleeve, then the mechatronic unit. The bolts holding the mechatronic unit to the transmission were flat tops on my transmission. The others were "curved" tops (forget the technical name right now). Double check with the chart! The different bolt head shapes make bolt removal a lot easier.

To remove the sleeve, I used a hook tool and pry bar to push/pull and wiggle the sleeve out. Note the Orientation of the sleeve features compared to the “key” in the sleeve. This is shown on page 8- it will make insertion easier.

With the mechatronic unit gently put aside, I pulled off the adaptor seal, and pulled out the rubber cylinder clutch seals with a hook tool. The guide referenced above doesn't show the replacement of the rubber cylinders that lead to the transmission clutches. With the mechatronic unit off, you will see four black rubber seals on the bottom of the transmission. The 4 removed seals were compressed and baked hard for sure. In my opinion, if you remove the mechatronics unit, you need to replace these parts, along with the mechatronic adapter seal. The new parts extended a couple mm out from the bottom surface and will for sure seal more effectively when compressed. There are Youtube videos showing most of this. You can buy kits with all the parts you need and I recommend CTSC because their guide is helpful. Thanks guys! I should have read the guide much more carefully before I started, but you know how that goes.

I then attached the mechatronic unit with bolts 1 and 4, loosely, and gently wiggled the mechatronic unit a bit to make sure the adaptor seal was seated correctly- it’s “keyed” so you can’t install it incorrectly. Or, at least most can’t. Torque the bolts as described in the guide with a properly sized torque wrench. This is very important.

Now install the new connector sleeve, spinning it back and forth a bit while pushing in to engage the key. You don’t need a lot of force while searching for the key engagement. It will be obvious when you have it engaged. At that point you just push it in evenly, then re-engage the lock, and plug in the connector- just like in the guide.

I then installed the new transmission pan and filled with new fluid until it dripped from the fill hole. Torque it like specified in the guide.

Now for the fun part. I unbolted the transmission cooler line clamp and slipped a tube from this kit (Hyper Tough Multi-Use Pump Universal 36200WD) in the end of the top metal line, then fed the other side of the tube to a graduated pan. While a friend held the lower transmission cooler line in the transmission outlet port (lower port), I started the engine and pumped out 2L at a time through the cooler and into the graduated pan, refilling the transmission sump until it overflowed each time. The first couple iterations I let the engine run only a couple seconds, then refilled the sump. I did this until fluid started to come out of the cooler return pipe and into the pan. From then on out I pumped out 2L at a time so the transmission pump would not starve. The fluid was very dark and a smelled a little bit burned. It was good to have changed it.

At this point it was late and I was pretty tired. You guys now the feeling. I should have stopped for the night, because this is when mistakes happen. During final level checking I did not have the engine running, so my fill was 2L low. Oops. On the test drive, as fluid sloshed around on hard stops, the pump would lose its prime and gears spontaneously changed as the clutch pressures fluctuated. It was actually cool to experience a low fluid condition. Now I know what it’s like. I was lucky nothing was damaged.

With the engine running and ISTA indicating 39C, I had a slow trickle. I read a ZF document stating a "trickle" is a series of drops. ISTA says get to a trickle between 30C and 40C, and if you check at over 50C, the fluid level is too low. This says to me a slow trickle anywhere between 30C and 40C is fine. If I was to do over, I would shoot for 35C. At 30C you will have the highest "in-spec" fluid volume. You make your own call. : )

All buttoned up, with the correct fluid level, new seals, and reset adaptions, the transmission shifts great. A real improvement for me. If I recall correctly, there is also a transmission oil aging reset in ISTA (on top of the transfer case oil age reset). Previously, I was getting slam shifts when cold and in sport mode, plus other little gremlins. I did follow the ZF adaption drive cycle for the most part, but not with nearly as many specified iterations. After a couple adaption resets, it seems the initial gradual acceleration runs through the gears are the most important. After that, the transmission seems to continue to learn as you drive around, logging the values it needs as you hit the driving profile it needs. You make the call on this using your own judgement. It's been a couple days and my 6HP28X is shifting great- well worth the effort.

Now for some controversy: I used Mercon SP fluid. I will do a regular drain and fill at 150k miles. For me, the evidence is clear Mercon SP is the same or very close to the BMW fluid. You do you!

-Water intrusion: Of course it rains a lot while I’m out of town for two weeks! Upon return, I learned the the rear hatch wiring grommet design is dumb. The grommet seals the wiring from the body to the rear hatch near the top hatch hinges. Why not just use the same design as all other auto makers for 50 year? The standard bulkhead style seal is proven! Nien! Use a grommet/ring clip! I noticed the problem when condensation built up in the driver rear tail light as the car sat in the sun. There was also a 1/4" pool of water down in that storage area below the tail light. Water had seeped past the seals from the wiring grommet into the rear trunk and rear hatch, then vaporized when warm, finally condensing on everything in that area, including the ECU modules. I had to remove the tail light and put it over a house heating register to dry it. In the process a couple tail light bulbs went out. I don’t know why. It might be the shock from clipping the bulb carrier back into the tail light. I just replaced all the bulbs on both sides.

Anyway, the BMW grommet design using an interior clip ring was clearly going to fail over time- pretty sure an intern designed it. I started by peeling the rubber "grommet" off the white clip ring its seated on, then used a pick tool to remove the plastic ring from the body. If you pull the tabs at the ends of the white clip ring you can get that side out, then the opposite side easily pulls out from the body. I cleaned the body and grommet mating surfaces with alcohol, reinserted the white ring into the grommet, then put down a bead of silicone and snapped the grommet/clip assembly back into the body. I did this for all four connection points and let it dry overnight.

A couple days later I noticed water seeping down the bottom of a rear door between the interior door panel and the metal door. It left a pool of water on the door sill that wicked into the carpet and foam backing pad. After some forum searches, I learned the door vapor barriers can come unglued. I took a tip and used butyl rain gutter adhesive to reattach it- seems fine now. There are DIYs on Youtube about how to remove the interior door panel. There are also little slits at the bottom of the door for water to escape. These need to be clear so water that drips through the window glass seal can escape. When the vapor barrier comes loose, water finds its way into the car and not down through these slits. I had to pull up the carpet and ventilate for quite a while. I also had to bleach and steam the driver seatbelt as some mildew started forming. I think vapor from the floor rose through the B pillar and moistened the belt. The headliner doesn't seem to be getting wet, but I will keep checking. If it does, I will check the sunroof drain.

-Fuel filter: pretty easy- nothing else to say about this. If you are doing it the first time you will need an approximately 1/2” hose clamp to replace a factory hose crimp band you cut off.

-Rear differential oil: also easy, but you need a fluid extractor. No drain plug. A set of hex adapters would be helpful.

-Transfer case oil: the clearance between the drain plug and transfer case support is tight. You need hex adapters, a low profile 14mm hex bit, low profile Allen key, or you will need to make an adapter with a 14mm bolt and two nuts. Crack the fill plug, first, in case you can’t open the drain. The fill plug is easy to get to with a socket extension after the plastic underbody cover is removed. After the refill, ISTA was used to reset the transfer case adaptions.

-Front differential oil: on the list! Will update later. Seems a little tricky and a cover that technically should be removed under the engine for access requires six $5 dollar stretch bolts to re-attach. Plus, I don’t feel like getting under the car for a while.

-Battery: the car was on its second battery, but it had never been registered and the Ah rating was incorrect, so I re-coded that. The original coding was for 105Ah, but the installed Bosch battery is 95Ah. I suspect some of the poor battery life problems I have read about in BMWs is related to improper battery replacement. You could also blame BMW for the complicated battery replacement procedure. In my opinion, coding the correct Ah rating and battery type is very important. In the early 2010’s, a lot of automakers rolled out “smart” alternator charging systems that charge on deceleration, etc, to save fuel. If the battery system thinks you have a 105Ah battery and you have a 90Ah battery, it may not charge thinking there is some reserve. Maybe it chronically runs your 90Ah battery to a high state of discharge, which would be bad. I may not have the particulars 100% correct here, but the bottom line is you have to take care when a battery is replaced in these cars. Use the same Ah rating and make sure the ISTA procedure is followed to register it. Registering a replacement does not recode the Ah setting in the car. I could not find a way to code Ah’s in in ISTA, so I used NCS expert. If you know how, please let us know. ISTA also wants the car to sit for 3 hours after registration. I suspect this is to calibrate the resting voltage of the connected battery for the charging system. Bottom line: you need to be on top of any hired help that swaps in a new battery for you. Walmart has AGMs in our group sizes for a good price.

-Oil changes: I like the top mounted oil filter. Using an oil extractor makes the task easy. I will change the oil filter every other oil change. Oil change at 5k miles. Walmart sells Pennzoil Euro L 0w30 BMW LL04 low SAPS oil for around $25/4Q. I found the Nav oil level indication matches the dip stick when: the engine is at operating temperature, the engine is off, and you have driven a couple trips. The engine oil level sensor may use the level on engine shutdown or other times to calibrate itself.

-Intake muffler / air box: somebody, most likely the dealer tech based on maintenance records, crunched the clamshell cover tabs on the air filter cover. The air filter was marginally sealed because the tabs were broken off and the cover was not sealed 100%. I wound up using JB Weld “steel” and a piece of aluminum strip filed down to rebuild the tabs. JB Weld “steel” is amazing.

-Power steering: used the turkey blaster method to refresh the Pentosin CHF power steering. Steering seemed lighter afterwards. Pentosin makes a less expensive mineral based replacement for “high milage” vehicles, so I would not over analyze what fluid to use. Anything “CHF” compatible is probably fine.

-Random re-coding: enabled quadruple turn signal flash, third brake light flash, euro active headlight programming, adjusted auto lock and unlock conditions, enabled weather band, enabled nav programmable hot key, rear hatch close with console button, plus other random minor features. Also, will disable TPMS tire sensors if I can’t get pressures to be displayed on the nav screen. In that case will enable TPMS by ABS.

Future:

Alternator rebuild, serpentine belts, tensioner, and whatever else breaks!

Also, one air spring is leaking- debating to replace both for around $300, or buying the Bilstein B12 kit with 4 shocks and four 2” lowering springs for around $1100.

The passenger side lower control arm main bushing is starting to crack. I’ll probably push both out and replace them with the power flex poly bushings just for fun.

I’ll add fender flares and maybe mud flaps. Might look cool with being 2” lower.

Active steering looks to be a possible retrofit if I ever have any power steering issues. ACC could also be possible from what I have seen on the E90 forums. Of course, I would use junk yard parts for all this. Otherwise, not cost effective, but this is just pie in the sky right now.

When I had the vehicle on the lift I forgot to check wheel bearing runout. Seems fine, but it’s a heavy vehicle with over 100k.


STILL AWAKE? Hope this helps somebody!
Thanks again to all the forum contributors!
Comments and corrections, appreciated.

Last edited by robinasu; 01-12-2020 at 08:28 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:25 PM
FredoinSF FredoinSF is offline
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Wow. Impressive list of work and very detailed post.
You should be ready to drive it another 100k miles with little outside of maintenance with what you”be done.


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Old 01-13-2020, 08:24 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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Thank you, I hope so!
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Old 01-14-2020, 06:48 AM
stevieg58 stevieg58 is offline
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Amazing post!! You really have done a remarkable job.

I'm curious about the spring on the EGR cooler. Do you have a picture? My son now has my old 35d and we just replaced his EGR cooler due to the spring breaking. Using a spring sure would have saved some dollars. Does one need to worry about the tension of the spring, or is the EGR cooler an "all or none" device (where I assume an accurate spring tension would be less necessary)?

Again - well done and thanks for posting.
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Old 01-14-2020, 07:53 AM
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Doug Huffman Doug Huffman is offline
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https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/e...lation/QCRcKJ8
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Scepticism and Animal Faith (1923)
Scepticism is the chastity of the intellect, and it is shameful to surrender it too soon or to the first comer: there is nobility in preserving it coolly and proudly through long youth, until at last, in the ripeness of instinct and discretion, it can be safely exchanged for fidelity and happiness.
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Eschew eristical argumentation. I am responsible for what I write, not for your understanding of it.
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Old 01-17-2020, 04:18 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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More tips

Ok, I was thinking about some other tips I forgot to mention- wish I could still edit the original post. Anyway:

-High pressure EGR cooler removal/installation: do yourself a big favor and remove both intake pipes between the air intake muffler (air filter housing) and the turbo. The lower pipe is the key part to remove. You remove one screw attaching the lower pipe, a couple connectors, and maybe the CCV hose depending on how you want to undo those parts. With the lower pipe removed, access to the two EGR cooler exhaust header bolts is a piece of cake. There is a specific procedure for tightening the HP EGR cooler. Make sure you do that, too, or it will break faster.

-When installing a new transmission cooler thermostat, make sure the old rubber sealing rings come off with the old part. You might freak out because transmission fluid and coolant will start leaking out. The trans thermostat has a temperature sensing element that needs contact with the trans fluid, so that's why trans fluid seeps out. The trans fluid doesn't gush, so you have some time, assuming you drained the cooling system or clamped the coolant hoses- but work quickly. Anyway, I didn't notice the old seal for the trans side had stayed stuck on the aluminum cooler while I started wrenching. I wasn't too tired, so I noticed something was up as the bolts where taking a long time to torque. I then removed the 2nd seal and the bolts torqued to 9Nm within a turn after seated. I did't find the official torque value, so I just checked it on removal of the original trans thermostat- it was about 9nm.

-Getting the radiator fan off isn't too bad, but you need to get everything out of the way and be patient with the tabs. It's amazing how much resistance can be caused by a small part dragging on the fan assembly, so getting both coolant hoses out of the fan assembly clips and getting all the wiring and intake pipe out of the way is key. BMW says to replace the 4 bolts for the cross member above the fan. The bolts looked perfect to me and upon removal the torque was 20nm, so I can't see them stretching. I have new bolts and will install them after I rebuild the alternator, install the free running alternator pulley, and install a new tensioner.

-The water pump was pretty straight forward. Getting the old gasket off was a pain due to access. BMW says to use a chisel, but it's awkward. I wound up gripping as close to the block on the little tabs as possible, then bent the tab back and forth about 50 times until it snapped off. The water pump I removed had about ~0.5 to 1mm of runout and the bearing was scratchy, but was not obviously leaking (maybe steaming as the records I have from the dealer mentioned low coolant). Maybe it could have gone a little while longer, but not much. The new pump had zero runout and was butter smooth. Oh yeah.

-When replacing all the air pipes and quick connect coolant hoses, use some silicone lube or a dab of coolant to slip on the fittings- much easier and pretty critical for the air pipes.

-To repair the door vapor barrier, the interior door panels have to come off. The panels are actually pretty well made, and should last a handful of removals if you are careful. Somebody had been there before me and snapped one clip mount, which is pretty hard to do with this design. Just follow the official BMW removal instructions using a plastic pry tool and it will be ok. I would up "fixing" the broken clip mount by installing the clip and putting a huge glob of silicone in the clip mount. Worked fine and made me feel better cuz I'm emo like that. If I ever open the doors again I'll make a new mount using scrap plastic and "JB weld steel," which still continues to amaze me. I also used JB weld to fix a couple plastic welds here and there. A couple accent lighting "light bars" in the doors had broken LED connectors from the previous hack- had to silicone them on since they had a marginal mechanical connections. Oh, and all four doors had various stages of vapor barrier decay and bug ecosystems at the bottom of the interior door panels. They better not leak again or I'll get emo, again. The hose test was successful. Overall, there were only a couple minor self inflicted injuries in the form of nicks/scratches. I saw alibaba express has the door clips for pretty cheap. Hopefully Bob the BMW is water tight for many years to come.

-Front differential: After I bought the stretch bolts, yesterday, for the lower stiffening plate that BMW says must be removed, I noticed there is a plastic access cover not mentioned in the BMW procedure for said plate. Hopefully I can get to the fill plug through the wheel well and not remove the lower structural member because I'm tired of going under the car. Apparently there might be non-reusable plastic rivets holding on some covers behind the wheel well. I bought a pack of 200 rivets on Alibaba express for like $4. lol

I will take a picture of my super professional EGR cooler flap return spring, soon, for you.

Last edited by robinasu; 01-17-2020 at 04:20 PM.
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Old 01-17-2020, 04:38 PM
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Doug Huffman Doug Huffman is offline
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All mechanical pumps' seals are cooled and lubricated by leaked-weeped pumped fluid. third generation BMW mechanical water pumps have a collection chamber for the weepage-leakage that is STEAMED off invisibly. Visible liquid from a third generation pump is evidence of failure of the seal.
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Scepticism is the chastity of the intellect, and it is shameful to surrender it too soon or to the first comer: there is nobility in preserving it coolly and proudly through long youth, until at last, in the ripeness of instinct and discretion, it can be safely exchanged for fidelity and happiness.
(The Works of George Santayana p. 65)

Eschew eristical argumentation. I am responsible for what I write, not for your understanding of it.
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Old 01-17-2020, 08:22 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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Here you go- I put GM style plastic wiring loom over the nearby vacuum hose to avoid abrasion from the spring.
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Old 01-18-2020, 12:57 PM
Kostyan Kostyan is offline
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nice job on getting all that work done. That work would have cost some $$$ . I had to pay about a grand for low pressure EGR valve and controller replacement. One of my rear airbags had a slow leak for a few months, and after the 2nd one started leaking, I spent $460 to replace both with Arnotts. All the work is done @ Indy shops. Also a 2012 and getting up there in miles at 96k.
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Old 02-02-2020, 12:26 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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Air Bags

I replaced the air bags recently, so the X5d is officially ready for long range service.

Also, I check the front and rear suspension and wheel bearings- both sets of wheel bearings were tight. There was evidence of oil leaking from both front shocks, which doesn't surprise me at 102k miles. The performance was also pretty suspect, but I had never driven the car new. The front strut isolation pads are also shot, which explains some clunking. All the ball joints and bushings were acceptable, except for the cracked front bushing I mentioned in a previous post. I wound up buying the power flex front bushings to replace them.

I also bought some new shocks.
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Old 02-02-2020, 12:42 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kostyan View Post
nice job on getting all that work done. That work would have cost some $$$ . I had to pay about a grand for low pressure EGR valve and controller replacement. One of my rear airbags had a slow leak for a few months, and after the 2nd one started leaking, I spent $460 to replace both with Arnotts. All the work is done @ Indy shops. Also a 2012 and getting up there in miles at 96k.
Labor is a killer these days. The previous owner showed me the estimate for the glow plug work, bushing replacement, and some other small stuff: $7000.00. The quote said more time would be needed to investigate the EGR codes. Insane-O. They know the common problems of the vehicle- pretty sure they would have come back later for the thermostat replacement for another $2000.00. They then got an indy quote for $4000.00 or something. I can't imagine what they would charge to fix the water intrusion problems I had. It would have been insane and given to a low end tech who probably would have F'd up the interior door panels.

Until I bought the shocks, I was under $1500 in parts for all the above work and I do the work in my spare time late at night. I like to wrench, so that helps. The shocks will be worth it. Nothing makes a car drive better than new shocks and a good suspension.
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  #12  
Old 02-03-2020, 09:58 AM
Badsmerf Badsmerf is offline
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Location: Washington
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 180
Mein Auto: 2010 X5 35d
What shocks did you go with? I'm @ 160,000 and have been considering doing mine.
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  #13  
Old 02-03-2020, 12:59 PM
robinasu robinasu is offline
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Location: CA
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 98
Mein Auto: M5
Shocks

I bought the Bilstein B12 kit. It comes with the Bilstein B8 shocks and four lowering springs. I'm 6'3" and still have to jump up a little to get in the driver seat the way I like it, plus around a 2" drop in the car will help the CG. Plus plus, I needed new shocks anyway, and why leave well enough alone!?

My vehicle won't be off pavement much, if at all. There may be a way to integrate the B8's in the rear and retain my air suspension with the 2" drop. I hope my plan works. The B12 kit arrives in a couple weeks.
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  #14  
Old 02-03-2020, 04:11 PM
Badsmerf Badsmerf is offline
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Location: Washington
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 180
Mein Auto: 2010 X5 35d
Hmmm. I don't think I'll go down that route. I hate the halfassed trim piece that I get a muddy leg from, but do take the X5 to the beach and trails, so don't want it dropped at all. Take some pics and start a thread when they come in!
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