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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. First post on this forum. I have a 08 Bmw 3351 twin turbo that brought back 30ff boost pressure too low code and 2ca8 02 sensor code. 162k miles on it. I had a euro car specialist look at it and here is what he told me what it would take to fix it after he diagonosed it to be an issue with the wastegate flaps? He said ''$295.00 each turbo to repair(wastegates), plus $1,800.00 for labor to remove exhaust manifolds,(Both turbo's) plus exhaust gaskets $110.00. that's if no bolts brake on the manifolds, or at the flange bolts. If bolts brake there may be an additional expense." Is this accurate or should I just take it to someone else.
Thanks in advance!
 

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Did he boost leak test the intake system? Did he vacuum test the boost control system?
If the turbos do in fact need to be pulled, that is indeed a very labor-intensive (expensive) job. I would consider replacing the turbos rather than repairing the wastegates.
 

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No he did not. He just cleared the codes and test drove it to see if the codes came back. What usually happens is the check engine light comes on after I accelerate rapidly and I get to a high speed. It goes away when I turn off the car. I haven't heard any rattle myself or maybe I don't know exactly how that would sound.
 

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Breaking in the Pony
2019 Mustang GT / 2005 Toyota Tacoma
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30FF is the inlet manifold pressure not reaching that being requested from the turbocharger. I had a randomly occurring one on my 335. It sets a half-engine light for that run cycle, and stores a shadow code. It may or may not result in actual reduced power operation of the engine.

There are a number of possible causes. In increasing level of costs to resolve:
  • Leaking vacuum line
  • Bad pressure converter(s) (side note: stupid name for a vacuum solenoid)
  • Inlet system leak after the turbos
  • Bad turbocharger/turbo actuators (which is where your mechanic is at the moment)
I'd work through in the order shown above.

Pull the engine cover. Hand trace the vacuum lines from (looking rearward) the left side of the engine to make sure none are cracked or loose. If they seem solid, you can check if the pressure converters are holding vacuum (search on the site - I've seen a description around here somewhere). If the pressure converters are holding vacuum and operating properly, do a search here on the site for how to do a smoke check for intake system leaks.

If you cover the first three items with no results, then your mechanic may be right. You should ask how he got where he is in the diagnostic tree.
 

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No he did not. He just cleared the codes and test drove it to see if the codes came back. What usually happens is the check engine light comes on after I accelerate rapidly and I get to a high speed. It goes away when I turn off the car. I haven't heard any rattle myself or maybe I don't know exactly how that would sound.
Myself, I'd want more before I dropped that much money. Unless of course, if it doesn't fix the issue, you get your money back. Yeah right! Good luck. N4S
 

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Myself, I'd want more before I dropped that much money. Unless of course, if it doesn't fix the issue, you get your money back. Yeah right! Good luck. N4S
Actually, the issue would be fixed, because in the process of the unecessary $3000 turbo repair, the mechanic would take the 5 minutes to replace the little rotten vacuum hose that's actually causing the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. I am not in a rush in fixing it until I get all my options clear. I will also get 2nd or third opinions from other mechanics.
 

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Actually, the issue would be fixed, because in the process of the unecessary $3000 turbo repair, the mechanic would take the 5 minutes to replace the little rotten vacuum hose that's actually causing the problem.
You think it could be just the vacuum? He did mention that to be one of the possible causes.
 

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Vacuum (on N54 turbos) is used to activate waste gates.

On mine, it is the 2nd time I have to replace the bushings of the waste gate axles. Bushing wear and allows waste gate to shift sideways while they are suppose to be closed. This allows exhaust back pressure to bypass the turbo (loss of power). My guess is that this is what you are experiencing (according to your description).
 
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