BimmerFest BMW Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Car ingested water & hydrolocked. Drained most of the water from the block. I am now able to rotate the crank pulley, but crank pulley will not rotate a full 360 degrees, something is obviously broken/bent internally. Would love to take it to a guru / specialist who has wet dreams of rebuilding BMW engines. Preferably in the South East but willing to deliver/ship the car for it to be in the right hands...

The second part to my question is do you think a standard 750 motor from 2013 and up will work rather easily as a replacement engine? If it does not makes sense to rebuild my original engine, I would wait for a wrecked Alpina engine to show up for sale somewhere... In the meantime, I would be happy with the standard 750 engine in order to get the car back on the road. I'm thinking it would work since the engines are so similar and its mostly the internals that are different. Obviously the engine management would be the tricky part, or maybe not?

Any help/thoughts are appreciated.... thank you. If there are any BMW Techs or Service Advisors reading this, please message me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
2013 Alpina B7L - Can anyone recommend an indy capable of rebuilding this eng...

Any N63Tu block will work. So it will have to be from a MY13 or newer car.
Personally If it were me I would find an engine builder that really knows this engine and have them build a fully built, balanced, blueprinted, ported/polished, bulletproof motor.

Then Pure upgraded turbos and intercoolers from an M5. You could easily tune a built motor on 93 octane to 750hp without breaking a sweat!

There are M5's without built motors, only stage 2 turbos, race gas, making 1000hp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
Car ingested water & hydrolocked. Drained most of the water from the block. I am now able to rotate the crank pulley, but crank pulley will not rotate a full 360 degrees, something is obviously broken/bent internally. Would love to take it to a guru / specialist who has wet dreams of rebuilding BMW engines. Preferably in the South East but willing to deliver/ship the car for it to be in the right hands...

The second part to my question is do you think a standard 750 motor from 2013 and up will work rather easily as a replacement engine? If it does not makes sense to rebuild my original engine, I would wait for a wrecked Alpina engine to show up for sale somewhere... In the meantime, I would be happy with the standard 750 engine in order to get the car back on the road. I'm thinking it would work since the engines are so similar and its mostly the internals that are different. Obviously the engine management would be the tricky part, or maybe not?

Any help/thoughts are appreciated.... thank you. If there are any BMW Techs or Service Advisors reading this, please message me.
If you had comprehensive insurance they cover this kind of stuff. You should of had a BMW check it out with the insurance before you messed with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Any N63Tu block will work. So it will have to be from a MY13 or newer car.
Personally If it were me I would find an engine builder that really knows this engine and have them build a fully built, balanced, blueprinted, ported/polished, bulletproof motor.

Then Pure upgraded turbos and intercoolers from an M5. You could easily tune a built motor on 93 octane to 750hp without breaking a sweat!

There are M5's without built motors, only stage 2 turbos, race gas, making 1000hp.
I'm sure... finding someone you can trust is easier said than done though. I'm pretty anal/particular about anyone touching my vehicles... with anyone I hire to perform a service for me... I try to find someone passionate about what they are doing, and not just someone out to get a check... I plan to keep this car for a long time so I am in no hurry (that's part of the reason I want to just throw a regular 50 motor in for the time being)... do you have any idea about the electronics side of things? I was pretty certain the motor would fit just fine... but I have to take into account exhaust, DME's, intercoolers, etc. Alpina has some slightly different parts... I really didn't buy the car because it was fast, my wife has a 650 Grand Coupe with the standard motor and that is plenty fast for me... car will be more of a highway cruiser/tourer anyway...

If you had comprehensive insurance they cover this kind of stuff. You should of had a BMW check it out with the insurance before you messed with it.
I purchased the vehicle knowing it needed an engine, was hydrolocked, and/or possibly needed a rebuild... BMW & insurance companies have nothing to do with my situation. I really didn't "mess with" anything yet... drained the oil, replaced the plugs, turned the engine over by hand... that's it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
I'm sure... finding someone you can trust is easier said than done though. I'm pretty anal/particular about anyone touching my vehicles... with anyone I hire to perform a service for me... I try to find someone passionate about what they are doing, and not just someone out to get a check... I plan to keep this car for a long time so I am in no hurry (that's part of the reason I want to just throw a regular 50 motor in for the time being)... do you have any idea about the electronics side of things? I was pretty certain the motor would fit just fine... but I have to take into account exhaust, DME's, intercoolers, etc. Alpina has some slightly different parts... I really didn't buy the car because it was fast, my wife has a 650 Grand Coupe with the standard motor and that is plenty fast for me... car will be more of a highway cruiser/tourer anyway...

I purchased the vehicle knowing it needed an engine, was hydrolocked, and/or possibly needed a rebuild... BMW & insurance companies have nothing to do with my situation. I really didn't "mess with" anything yet... drained the oil, replaced the plugs, turned the engine over by hand... that's it.
How much did you pay for it??

Also how did you remove the airbox and can a non-Angular socket work to remove the plugs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
2013 Alpina B7L - Can anyone recommend an indy capable of rebuilding this eng...

All of the electronics are the same on the N63Tu and Alpina motor. Alpina has some hardware differences.
DME'a, exhaust, intercoolers, are all the same to my knowledge.
Alpina turbos are slightly different. The housing is the same but I believe the internals are different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,118 Posts
Where are you located beside on Earth? it would help to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How much did you pay for it??

Also how did you remove the airbox and can a non-Angular socket work to remove the plugs?
Cheap enough that I had to pull the trigger, expensive enough that I need to be careful with how I go about repairing it so I don't break the bank. Socket I purchased online... pointless in trying a regular socket... its 12 point I believe, thin wall, and swivel all at the same time... too much can go wrong trying to cut corners with the wrong socket... airbox pretty much pops off after you disconnect some hose clamps...

All of the electronics are the same on the N63Tu and Alpina motor. Alpina has some hardware differences.
DME'a, exhaust, intercoolers, are all the same to my knowledge.
Alpina turbos are slightly different. The housing is the same but I believe the internals are different.
I read the Alpina has larger turbos... not sure if the are physically larger or just the internals, also I heard the exhaust is bigger as well as the intercoolers... I understand my question is a loaded one, not too many B7's around and definitely not too many people trying to put the less powerful engine in it even though it will be temporary...

Where are you located beside on Earth? it would help to know.
Sorry about that... I updated my profile... Atlanta...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Regular engine plus a tune would get you closer. I think you should try and locate a good builder. See what is if any are laying on ebay. I think after its all said and done retrofitting a n63tu in the alpima without all the necessary goodies you will be in it pretty deep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
Cheap enough that I had to pull the trigger, expensive enough that I need to be careful with how I go about repairing it so I don't break the bank. Socket I purchased online... pointless in trying a regular socket... its 12 point I believe, thin wall, and swivel all at the same time... too much can go wrong trying to cut corners with the wrong socket... airbox pretty much pops off after you disconnect some hose clamps...

I read the Alpina has larger turbos... not sure if the are physically larger or just the internals, also I heard the exhaust is bigger as well as the intercoolers... I understand my question is a loaded one, not too many B7's around and definitely not too many people trying to put the less powerful engine in it even though it will be temporary...

Sorry about that... I updated my profile... Atlanta...
can you show me the link of what the socket looks like exactly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Car ingested water & hydrolocked. Drained most of the water from the block. I am now able to rotate the crank pulley, but crank pulley will not rotate a full 360 degrees, something is obviously broken/bent internally. Would love to take it to a guru / specialist who has wet dreams of rebuilding BMW engines. Preferably in the South East but willing to deliver/ship the car for it to be in the right hands...

The second part to my question is do you think a standard 750 motor from 2013 and up will work rather easily as a replacement engine? If it does not makes sense to rebuild my original engine, I would wait for a wrecked Alpina engine to show up for sale somewhere... In the meantime, I would be happy with the standard 750 engine in order to get the car back on the road. I'm thinking it would work since the engines are so similar and its mostly the internals that are different. Obviously the engine management would be the tricky part, or maybe not?

Any help/thoughts are appreciated.... thank you. If there are any BMW Techs or Service Advisors reading this, please message me.
If you're willing to ship, reach out to BMWOEM1 who is a master technician & does a lot of work for people on this forum. He's located in NY.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
can you show me the link of what the socket looks like exactly?
Not affiliated with the site in any way but the one I have looks like this and works perfectly:

https://www.toolsource.com/individu...IMhP2uBaRPjoitQEM7la87LKuUm54iwEgzBoCRvHw_wcB

If you're willing to ship, reach out to BMWOEM1 who is a master technician & does a lot of work for people on this forum. He's located in NY.
I spoke with him a few months ago, he couldn't handle it... thanks though... I believe it was too big of a job and would tie him up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
2013 Alpina B7L - Can anyone recommend an indy capable of rebuilding this eng...

Car ingested water & hydrolocked. Drained most of the water from the block. I am now able to rotate the crank pulley, but crank pulley will not rotate a full 360 degrees, something is obviously broken/bent internally. Would love to take it to a guru / specialist who has wet dreams of rebuilding BMW engines. Preferably in the South East but willing to deliver/ship the car for it to be in the right hands...

The second part to my question is do you think a standard 750 motor from 2013 and up will work rather easily as a replacement engine? If it does not makes sense to rebuild my original engine, I would wait for a wrecked Alpina engine to show up for sale somewhere... In the meantime, I would be happy with the standard 750 engine in order to get the car back on the road. I'm thinking it would work since the engines are so similar and its mostly the internals that are different. Obviously the engine management would be the tricky part, or maybe not?

Any help/thoughts are appreciated.... thank you. If there are any BMW Techs or Service Advisors reading this, please message me.
There was a great Indy in Augusta, RS Augusta, but I don't know if they're still running the shop side anymore. Still worth a shot as they're active on forums with a different successful automotive business. Worst case they may have a recommendation. I know 2 companies on the east coast that are very capable and could do a rebuild if it's feasible, but it will be a very expensive job no matter what.

I enjoy a good challenge, but this is one I wouldn't tackle. As similar as the Alpina Variant is to the N63 and S63, it's also quite different as well.

If the car can still activate the ignition terminal and the DME's read out, I'd use Rheingold to read the fault codes. If the ingestion event is still present, the conditions will be included. If it was above idle speed when the hydrolock occurred, it probably won't be financially worthwhile to explore a rebuild. If this isn't possible now, how far has it been torn down? If it was a catastrophic failure, the block tends to blow out inside the V, frequently at the #1 and/or #8 cylinder. Removing the exhaust manifolds will give a clear view.

Sourcing good condition used parts is also a difficult task. NA Market Alpina's are unique in a very important way. They are imported as BMW 750Li/LiX; not as Alpina B7/X. There is no distinction federally for the paperwork to distinguish an Alpina so it's common to see 750 M Sport salvage cars being advertised as Alpina B7's and it's completely within the law to do so.

I've yet to see an N63 or Variant rebuilt after a hydrolock. In Miami Beach, this occurs on a daily basis so it's a regular sight to see. Usually they're totaled out of more than 18mos old or a complete motor installed if it's relatively new. The short motor alone is over $20k new with discount. The block itself comes with the matched pistons pre-seated to the walls. A new block cannot be acquired without them and it's a 5 figure price tag. If the intake, exhaust and ancillaries need replacement as well, it's approaching $40k for the job with labor. Unless you're in the car for under $10k, you'll probably end up investing more than a clean car would have been IMO. There is a 2014 in Atlanta with 23k miles, minor body/paint history, and is missing the Alpina wheels but the price is in the very low $40's. I think that changes the viability quite a bit.

Swapping in a standard N63 is going to need some custom work to run, even temporarily. It's a lot to consider, but would make for an interesting read if documented. More than happy to provide as much insight as possible if this is really something you want to proceed with.

What would be an interesting and likely easier alternative would be to swap in an S63TU. It's been done, 2 by M GmbH, but none have ever been revealed publicly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
hi
not got any links to this company but thought id post it just in case its usefull. there sa salvage yard in the u.k that's breaking an alpine b6. I think the engine supposed to be the same so if the price is right might be a simple case of just changing them over
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2013-BMW-...336755?hash=item543a4c6033:g:L74AAOSwLF1X8hl2
Thanks for the link... I saw that car as well... and i am even going to the UK next week... I am assuming that motor is different because my motor has the dual water cooled DME's behind each headlight...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There was a great Indy in Augusta, RS Augusta, but I don't know if they're still running the shop side anymore. Still worth a shot as they're active on forums with a different successful automotive business. Worst case they may have a recommendation. I know 2 companies on the east coast that are very capable and could do a rebuild if it's feasible, but it will be a very expensive job no matter what.

Appreciate that... please message me the other 2 shops and I will reach out to RS Augusta.


I enjoy a good challenge, but this is one I wouldn't tackle. As similar as the Alpina Variant is to the N63 and S63, it's also quite different as well.

Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you tackle it? Are you a BMW tech or indy? In life I've usually found the guys that are reluctant to do a particular job are usually the guys you want doing the job...


If the car can still activate the ignition terminal and the DME's read out, I'd use Rheingold to read the fault codes. If the ingestion event is still present, the conditions will be included. If it was above idle speed when the hydrolock occurred, it probably won't be financially worthwhile to explore a rebuild. If this isn't possible now, how far has it been torn down? If it was a catastrophic failure, the block tends to blow out inside the V, frequently at the #1 and/or #8 cylinder. Removing the exhaust manifolds will give a clear view.

Car does not have a single scratch on it with the exception of the water ingestion, car is flawless. Everything works. All I have right now is an Autel DS708. Not sure if it can go as in depth as the Rheingold to read the codes. Engine has not been torn down at all. Intake removed, spark plugs and coil packs removed... that's it.


Sourcing good condition used parts is also a difficult task. NA Market Alpina's are unique in a very important way. They are imported as BMW 750Li/LiX; not as Alpina B7/X. There is no distinction federally for the paperwork to distinguish an Alpina so it's common to see 750 M Sport salvage cars being advertised as Alpina B7's and it's completely within the law to do so.

I always wondered what the hell was going on with that! I've been looking for a wrecked B7 with a good motor that I could just replace mine with (easiest route to go). I would always see vehicles registered as Alpinas that were standard 7's. Sounds strange that it was done that way... I wonder if that is the reason the cars are not individually numbered on the Alpina plaque attached to the headliner?

I've yet to see an N63 or Variant rebuilt after a hydrolock. In Miami Beach, this occurs on a daily basis so it's a regular sight to see. Usually they're totaled out of more than 18mos old or a complete motor installed if it's relatively new. The short motor alone is over $20k new with discount. The block itself comes with the matched pistons pre-seated to the walls. A new block cannot be acquired without them and it's a 5 figure price tag. If the intake, exhaust and ancillaries need replacement as well, it's approaching $40k for the job with labor. Unless you're in the car for under $10k, you'll probably end up investing more than a clean car would have been IMO. There is a 2014 in Atlanta with 23k miles, minor body/paint history, and is missing the Alpina wheels but the price is in the very low $40's. I think that changes the viability quite a bit.

Yep... very well aware of the numbers involved... its not for the faint of heart but I've done this same exact thing with a few cars I own... the main key really is just time and patience... and to get it done right the first time... whichever route i choose to go...

Swapping in a standard N63 is going to need some custom work to run, even temporarily. It's a lot to consider, but would make for an interesting read if documented. More than happy to provide as much insight as possible if this is really something you want to proceed with.

What would be an interesting and likely easier alternative would be to swap in an S63TU. It's been done, 2 by M GmbH, but none have ever been revealed publicly.
I definitely appreciate the knowledge you've shared thus far and the time you've taken to respond... Putting in the S63TU is my dream actually... I asked a few people about the possibility of doing so and they basically laughed at me. To me that would make for the ultimate car... the crazy thing is the S63TU variant is actually an easier engine for me to find compared to the Alpina variant... Why do you think the S63TU would be easier than the N63? What custom work do you think would be needed with either engine? Whatever engine I decide to go with (if it's not an identical B7 engine), I plan on picking up a complete parts car to make life easier. Thank you again for your time...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
2013 Alpina B7L - Can anyone recommend an indy capable of rebuilding this eng...

Appreciate that... please message me the other 2 shops and I will reach out to RS Augusta.

Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you tackle it? Are you a BMW tech or indy? In life I've usually found the guys that are reluctant to do a particular job are usually the guys you want doing the job...

Car does not have a single scratch on it with the exception of the water ingestion, car is flawless. Everything works. All I have right now is an Autel DS708. Not sure if it can go as in depth as the Rheingold to read the codes. Engine has not been torn down at all. Intake removed, spark plugs and coil packs removed... that's it.

I always wondered what the hell was going on with that! I've been looking for a wrecked B7 with a good motor that I could just replace mine with (easiest route to go). I would always see vehicles registered as Alpinas that were standard 7's. Sounds strange that it was done that way... I wonder if that is the reason the cars are not individually numbered on the Alpina plaque attached to the headliner?

Yep... very well aware of the numbers involved... its not for the faint of heart but I've done this same exact thing with a few cars I own... the main key really is just time and patience... and to get it done right the first time... whichever route i choose to go...

I definitely appreciate the knowledge you've shared thus far and the time you've taken to respond... Putting in the S63TU is my dream actually... I asked a few people about the possibility of doing so and they basically laughed at me. To me that would make for the ultimate car... the crazy thing is the S63TU variant is actually an easier engine for me to find compared to the Alpina variant... Why do you think the S63TU would be easier than the N63? What custom work do you think would be needed with either engine? Whatever engine I decide to go with (if it's not an identical B7 engine), I plan on picking up a complete parts car to make life easier. Thank you again for your time...
Will send as soon as I can clear out enough space in my PM box faster than it fills up again.

Rheingold - ISTA/D is BMW's software and will provide far more information than the Autel ever could as long as it wasn't it erased. It's easy to obtain, use, and a good place to begin before tearing it down physically. It also will be good to have later on. Pulling the exhaust manifold isn't difficult and provides easy visual access to the weak spots in the block. Can look down into the turbines also. If it ingested water all the way to the turbos, or backwards from the exhaust, the cats probably exploded inside as well so there may be ceramic debris all over.

Alpina is not registered as a new vehicle manufacturer with US DOT. Even if they were, the cost of certifying the very small volume of cars is beyond their financial ability. Even if they could sell every B7 for $300k, they still would lose 6 figure on each car. BMW however can self certify the car as a 750Li/X without petition under the "substantially similar to a motor vehicle of the same model year, manufactured for sale in the United States, and certified by the manufacturer as complying with all applicable FMVSS requirements without modification" loophole. No additional safety tests are required saving tens of millions in costs and the EPA certification is rather simple. For this reason, US Alpina's are fully assembled in Dingolfing by BMW AG with a BMW VIN and type designation. They only make a quick stop at Alpina for QC check. They're still very much an Alpina, just with a different assembly process.

I did complete BMW Step a very long time ago but never worked as a tech. I've been in OEM and Aftermarket manufacturing and distribution for a while now and have done some fairly wild builds for myself and clients. My reluctance is purely personal for whatever it's worth for a few reasons. FIrst, it was deemed a total loss for a reason. If the ingestion occurred during an event affecting a large number of claims, the odds are slightly better that the damage may be repairable. If it was an isolated incident, the motor is more likely than not to be toast. Non collision claims have have a higher threshold than collision claims due to labor so the claims adjuster put the repair estimate somewhere in excess of 70% of the value of the car. Not a very good initial impression. Second, if it is possible to rebuild to original spec, an ENORMOUS amount of patience trying to source used and custom components or deep pockets to get new or reman items is required. I definitely don't recommend attempting to import an engine from another country other than Canada. EU and US use different DME's which adds another hurdle to clear. Not to mention it's a complete pain in the ass with no guarantee it will make it through customs even when it's for a legitimate and well documented use. CBP seems to have a lot of bored agents looking for some entertainment in recent years. Third, and something that may be met with a bit of animosity, The Fxx B7 never gave me the fizz and never really felt like an Alpina. For me, the E38 B12 was the last big Alpina with all the character that made it special. The E65 at least had the supercharger whine, but not much else.

Now, if the car really is clean; its inability to propel itself at the moment not withstanding, it would make a good candidate for a unique transplant. Installing a normal N63 seems somewhat insulting, not to mention a waste of funds that can go towards an improvement instead of a downgrade. Without going bonkers, an S63TU is a really good idea. Physically, it fits with very little modification, is OEM+, easily sourced, and can be reliably tuned by a significant amount. The total investment could be less than rebuilding the Alpina motor. The ZF8HP can be mated to the S63 and if you update to a higher torque version, can handle more than the M5/6 DCT ever could. Anyone who laughed at the notion either lacks the skill to try it or cannot think outside the box at all. M GmbH saw fit to build a few in the Skunkwerks program so it can't be that insane of an idea. If you manage to meet the right people, a small string or two could've pulled that may lead to some plausible deniability info.

That's a project I could get exited about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
The S63tu makes way more sense. The ZF 8 speed is a very strong trans like mentioned above, can handle a lot of power. It is not however a DCT and will never shift like one.
The engine bay and layout is also far less cluttered and looks nicer.
 

·
whughes
Joined
·
2,040 Posts
I would be more worried about how the engine ingested water, sounds like a flood victim, if so, there are a ton of problems down the road, every connector, processor, the list just never stops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Will send as soon as I can clear out enough space in my PM box faster than it fills up again.

Rheingold - ISTA/D is BMW's software and will provide far more information than the Autel ever could as long as it wasn't it erased. It's easy to obtain, use, and a good place to begin before tearing it down physically. It also will be good to have later on. Pulling the exhaust manifold isn't difficult and provides easy visual access to the weak spots in the block. Can look down into the turbines also. If it ingested water all the way to the turbos, or backwards from the exhaust, the cats probably exploded inside as well so there may be ceramic debris all over.

Understood...

Alpina is not registered as a new vehicle manufacturer with US DOT. Even if they were, the cost of certifying the very small volume of cars is beyond their financial ability. Even if they could sell every B7 for $300k, they still would lose 6 figure on each car. BMW however can self certify the car as a 750Li/X without petition under the "substantially similar to a motor vehicle of the same model year, manufactured for sale in the United States, and certified by the manufacturer as complying with all applicable FMVSS requirements without modification" loophole. No additional safety tests are required saving tens of millions in costs and the EPA certification is rather simple. For this reason, US Alpina's are fully assembled in Dingolfing by BMW AG with a BMW VIN and type designation. They only make a quick stop at Alpina for QC check. They're still very much an Alpina, just with a different assembly process.

Got it...

I did complete BMW Step a very long time ago but never worked as a tech. I've been in OEM and Aftermarket manufacturing and distribution for a while now and have done some fairly wild builds for myself and clients. My reluctance is purely personal for whatever it's worth for a few reasons. FIrst, it was deemed a total loss for a reason. If the ingestion occurred during an event affecting a large number of claims, the odds are slightly better that the damage may be repairable. If it was an isolated incident, the motor is more likely than not to be toast. Non collision claims have have a higher threshold than collision claims due to labor so the claims adjuster put the repair estimate somewhere in excess of 70% of the value of the car. Not a very good initial impression. Second, if it is possible to rebuild to original spec, an ENORMOUS amount of patience trying to source used and custom components or deep pockets to get new or reman items is required. I definitely don't recommend attempting to import an engine from another country other than Canada. EU and US use different DME's which adds another hurdle to clear. Not to mention it's a complete pain in the ass with no guarantee it will make it through customs even when it's for a legitimate and well documented use. CBP seems to have a lot of bored agents looking for some entertainment in recent years. Third, and something that may be met with a bit of animosity, The Fxx B7 never gave me the fizz and never really felt like an Alpina. For me, the E38 B12 was the last big Alpina with all the character that made it special. The E65 at least had the supercharger whine, but not much else.

I hear you... it doesn't take much to total out a hydrolocked B7 though... the price tag on just the engine alone is silly... labor, storage, towing, rental car... once you factor all that in, it's quite an easy decision for an insurer... I feel the current B7 has a good foundation to build upon... whatever it may be lacking, wouldn't take much more to make right in my opinion... every person is different though... the E38 sport is still one of my favorite BMW's till this day, so I'm sure the Alpina version is even better...

Now, if the car really is clean; its inability to propel itself at the moment not withstanding, it would make a good candidate for a unique transplant. Installing a normal N63 seems somewhat insulting, not to mention a waste of funds that can go towards an improvement instead of a downgrade. Without going bonkers, an S63TU is a really good idea. Physically, it fits with very little modification, is OEM+, easily sourced, and can be reliably tuned by a significant amount. The total investment could be less than rebuilding the Alpina motor. The ZF8HP can be mated to the S63 and if you update to a higher torque version, can handle more than the M5/6 DCT ever could. Anyone who laughed at the notion either lacks the skill to try it or cannot think outside the box at all. M GmbH saw fit to build a few in the Skunkwerks program so it can't be that insane of an idea. If you manage to meet the right people, a small string or two could've pulled that may lead to some plausible deniability info.

That's a project I could get exited about.
Installing a N63 is definitely insulting, but I would have done it moreso for the exercise/learning experience... I know I would learn a ton about the car & engine if I did it and it would get my feet wet. Combine that with the fact that I can basically get a low mileage N63 for free... As I said earlier... I'm keeping this car for a while so eventually the correct engine would work its way back in there someday... or the S63 if things work out. If the S63 makes its way into the car, I just want EVERYTHING to work properly (electronics & features)... as if the car was built with that engine from the factory... I need to meet the right people...

The S63tu makes way more sense. The ZF 8 speed is a very strong trans like mentioned above, can handle a lot of power. It is not however a DCT and will never shift like one.
The engine bay and layout is also far less cluttered and looks nicer.
It's looking that way... I just want to dot all the I's and cross all the T's before I pull the trigger...

I would be more worried about how the engine ingested water, sounds like a flood victim, if so, there are a ton of problems down the road, every connector, processor, the list just never stops.
Thanks, but I'm not worried... so I don't want you to worry... car is white glove clean... there will be no issues that I can't handle, if any relating to water...
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top