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I found a 2015 535i and a 2015 528i I like. The 535 is a little over $5k more. $29.8k vs. $35k. They are both loaded. Msport, Lighting Package, Driver Asistance Package, Premium Package, and Aerodynamic Kit. The 535i has about 33k miles and the 528i has about 24k miles. I know the 535 has the 6 cylinder and thus more power. But other than that, the vehicles look identical. Right Down to the color. The are both CPO BMW cars.

Car Gurus say the 535i is about $2,900 above market, even though it was already reduced by $2k, and says the $528i is about $750 above market. the 528 had also been reduced by $2k. I really want the extra power of the 535, but don't think it's worth the $5k + premium.

Can you really feel the difference in the power of the 535? I've driven the 528 but not the 535.

What do you guys think? Should I wait till the new year when the cars will technically be another year older and the dealers have to drop the prices even more? I have the Links to the cars below...

https://www.centerbmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-535i-c37e86010a0d0c1475f75c7b3e3b6560.htm


https://www.southbaybmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-528i+Sedan-for-sale-in-Torrance-CA-c423fda60a0d0c1475f75c7bb070a71a.htm
 

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Glfbggy
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For me the concern will always be whether or not the I6 engine will be more durable. We tend to keep our cars for 10+ years. That said, if the pricing is that much higher than market, make them a market based offer and put the ball in their court.


Many people don't like negotiating for cars. Since we never 'need' a car when we shop, it is actually a fun game for me. I always work to get market or better pricing based on my research through Kelly Blue Book, Edmunds.com and other sources of car prices based on the options available.
 

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I would go 6 cylinder if I were you. The I6 is fairly reliable IMO but it depends on how you ride the turbos too and both cars are turbo charged. Plus I feel like with the weight of the car, the 4 cylinder might be under powered.
 

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The early model-year 2015 528i's have a problem with the timing chains. That was supposedly corrected with engines made starting in January 2015, and therefore cars made in February 2015. But, there are a lot of model year 2015 cars with the engines made in 2014. It the 528i is one of them... run to the 535i. There's an upgrade for the early engines, but it's about $5k for the low-emission N26 version of the engine.

The 528i has almost 10k fewer miles. My ownership cost (depreciation and maintenance) for my 2014 is now about $0.50 to $0.60 per mile. Another way of looking at it is that the 535i you're looking at has an extra $5k of wear and tear on it, in addition to being $5k more to buy.

If you really like romping around in your car, the 535i is great. If you like driving gently and maximizing your MPG, the 538i's are amazing at that. The only really annoying thing is the four-cylinder drone. But, you only hear that when the windows are down or the sunroof is open.

Paint and tires should be considerations.

Since they're CPO's, they should have new or near new tires.

If you really want to be a twerp, get an independent, high-end detailer to electronically measure the thickness of the clear coat, especially on the horizontal surfaces. Clear coats have UV blockers, but they migrate to the top when the clear coat dries. "Reconditioning" at used car dealers polishes away whatever amount of the clear coat necessary to make the car look new again. But, that also gets rid of the UV blockers. High-end detailers have a gadget that costs several thousand dollars that measures the thicknesses of the various layer of paint (clear, color, primer) using ultrasonics.

I found a unicorn 328i for sale in California, six years old with only 9k miles. I need a cheap road trip car for the next 18 to 24 months, for a project that will cause me to put about 50k miles on a car. The unicorn had the early engine with the timing chain problem. If the price of the car were to come down, I would have come out to look at it, but I'd have a detailer come by and electronically measure the clear coat.

Look down the oil fill holes in the top of the engines with a flashlight. The metal parts should be spotless. The plastic parts will be brown from absorbing oil, and the plastic fill cap might have some crud on the bottom of it. If either of the engines have a brown "varnish" on the metal parts, run! If there's sludge (black chunks), punch the salesman in the nose and then run.

The 528i is a super-duper low emission vehicle, where the 535i is just low emissions. That makes a difference on the warranties in California. I don't know the details, because we don't bother with emission testing in Floriduh. All of our smog just blows over to Africa and Europe.
 

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2015 528i
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Yes just traded my 2015 528i to a 2016 535i due to potential timing chain issue. Very pleased. Big difference in power, no more worry abut the timing chain thing.
 

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Can you really feel the difference in the power of the 535? I've driven the 528 but not the 535.
Yes, yes you can.

Not that the 528i is a slow car, my wife has one and it drives very nicely. Just don't expect much excitement when you get on the gas. The question is: how much does that matter to you?

Go drive both, you'll know right away if it's worth it to you.

In 2012 I wanted a hard-top convertible. Told myself that it was for cruising, who cares about how fast it is? Test drove the E93 328i. It was nice. Sales guy could tell I wasn't loving it, insisted I drive a 335i. It was NICE. A personal and subjective choice.
 

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I found a 2015 535i and a 2015 528i I like. The 535 is a little over $5k more. $29.8k vs. $35k. They are both loaded. Msport, Lighting Package, Driver Asistance Package, Premium Package, and Aerodynamic Kit. The 535i has about 33k miles and the 528i has about 24k miles. I know the 535 has the 6 cylinder and thus more power. But other than that, the vehicles look identical. Right Down to the color. The are both CPO BMW cars.

Car Gurus say the 535i is about $2,900 above market, even though it was already reduced by $2k, and says the $528i is about $750 above market. the 528 had also been reduced by $2k. I really want the extra power of the 535, but don't think it's worth the $5k + premium.

Can you really feel the difference in the power of the 535? I've driven the 528 but not the 535.

What do you guys think? Should I wait till the new year when the cars will technically be another year older and the dealers have to drop the prices even more? I have the Links to the cars below...

https://www.centerbmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-535i-c37e86010a0d0c1475f75c7b3e3b6560.htm


https://www.southbaybmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-528i+Sedan-for-sale-in-Torrance-CA-c423fda60a0d0c1475f75c7bb070a71a.htm
First, I'd say that both cars are significantly over-priced. One of my co-workers just traded in a 2015 535xi and got less than $20k for it. It was high mileage, but still. In terms of which one, you need to drive both to be sure, but from where I sit, you only buy the 528 version if you don't care about performance and just want the looks. The 528i isn't embarrassingly slow, but the power difference between the two is astounding. The 528i is an adequate car and would have been a top shelf performance sedan 15-20 years ago, but it is not that today. The truth is that the 535i is only slightly ahead of the lower level competition these days when it comes to performance.

As far as waiting to buy it after it's had more time to depreciate, all I can say is that you'll be hard pressed to find quality cars that depreciate as quickly as German performance sedans and just like every sedan on the market, there's less demand now than there was five years ago. Back in early 2014, I bought a 3 year old 328xi for $24,500 because I couldn't find a 3 year old 535i for less than $38,000 within a reasonable driving distance. When I bought my current car in mid 2016, I got a mildly high mileage 3 year old 5 series for $32,000. Right now, a 3 year old car that's roughly the same as mine is available locally for $26,000. So, as I mentioned to start with, those cars are overpriced, because I don't know that I'd pay an extra $9,000 to get a car with 20,000 miles less on it, but that's up to you. Certainly, if those cars sit on the lot, the prices will drop quickly.

Before I bought my car in 2016, I had looked at a base level 535i xDrive that had almost no features. It was a little high in miles but they were only asking $24,000. Because it wasn't what I wanted as a whole, I offered them $21,000. They refused the offer. That car sat on their lot for 9 more months before they sold it for $19,000 to just get rid of the damned thing. So, if you don't mind the risk of losing the car you are looking at, waiting isn't bad.
 

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I found a 2015 535i and a 2015 528i I like. The 535 is a little over $5k more. $29.8k vs. $35k. They are both loaded. Msport, Lighting Package, Driver Asistance Package, Premium Package, and Aerodynamic Kit. The 535i has about 33k miles and the 528i has about 24k miles. I know the 535 has the 6 cylinder and thus more power. But other than that, the vehicles look identical. Right Down to the color. The are both CPO BMW cars.

Car Gurus say the 535i is about $2,900 above market, even though it was already reduced by $2k, and says the $528i is about $750 above market. the 528 had also been reduced by $2k. I really want the extra power of the 535, but don't think it's worth the $5k + premium.

Can you really feel the difference in the power of the 535? I've driven the 528 but not the 535.

What do you guys think? Should I wait till the new year when the cars will technically be another year older and the dealers have to drop the prices even more? I have the Links to the cars below...

https://www.centerbmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-535i-c37e86010a0d0c1475f75c7b3e3b6560.htm


https://www.southbaybmw.com/certified/BMW/2015-BMW-528i+Sedan-for-sale-in-Torrance-CA-c423fda60a0d0c1475f75c7bb070a71a.htm
CarGurus' price evaluation should only be a very small part of your buying process. The deciding factors are what are the 535i's and 528i's going for in your buying area? Are you willing to expand your buying area by buying out-of-state?

Also, as has already been stated a few times, only you can decide whether a 528i is good enough. I wanted a 550i but I would have had very little opportunity (if any) to use the power in my daily commutes, so the extra money spent would be just a waste.
 

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I would go for the 535i for the extra power. The 5 series is a heavy car and performance is enhanced with the larger engine. It all comes down to your preferences for performance versus economy.
 

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+1 for the 535. The passing power is really sweet. Plus, this is a long time motor, not a new design. Do drive both.

Good luck.
:thumbup:
 

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Like everyone said really based on what you like. I bought a 2015 528i. I liked the way it looked. And didn't care for the extra power. I live in San Francisco and going up steep hills is still a breeze. BMWs have great gas mileage so either or your not really saving that much more gas if you go with a 528i. I think it was only a 2-4 mpg difference for the 535i and if you cared that much for 4mpg I don't think you should be driving a BMW haha. I also preferred the dual exhaust on the 528i instead of the dual exhaust on the 535i, those two pipe holes are small for such a wide car on the 535i.

I would also suggest your income and goals in life. Don't put all your money onto one vehicle. Cars and especially BMWs depreciate very fast and better stuff come out every year. Especially the next 5 years a lot of great cars are coming out. If your young start off with something smaller and grudually upgrade as you grow and income grows.

Also I believe bmw CPO cars can only be 4 years old or newer. So technically if you want a cpo car but wait till next year you can only buy 2016 models and newer. But because the 2015 will be unavailable as cpo cars the closer you get to the new year the better chance the dealership would probably give you a discount.
 

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My ownership cost (depreciation and maintenance) for my 2014 is now about $0.50 to $0.60 per mile.
Uhm, Obviously I make no effort to calculate depreciation cost of my 14' 535, as it is a mute point since it is my intention to drive the car until the bottom falls out. Still, keeping a rather accurate tally, and for now my total cost of ownership comes down to $1.21, or twice what you are reporting. Have you bought yours new?
 

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Uhm, Obviously I make no effort to calculate depreciation cost of my 14' 535, as it is a mute point since it is my intention to drive the car until the bottom falls out. Still, keeping a rather accurate tally, and for now my total cost of ownership comes down to $1.21, or twice what you are reporting. Have you bought yours new?
The only person I trust enough to buy a used BMW from is... me. So, I buy them new. I learned my lesson about keeping them until they're run into the ground. My current strategery is to keep them 100k miles.

I took two years of bookkeeping in high school. Decades ago, I decided that the best way to quantify the ownership cost of cars was to consider them as assets, but assets that depreciate. That makes the annual depreciation an expense. Quantifying that annual expense is part of making financial decisions: What cars to buy? How long to keep them?

I look up the KBB values of my cars on the anniversaries of their purchases, and at the end of the calendar year. This allows me to quantify the annual depreciation I incur.

I also calculate the "interest" I incur on my vehicles: loan interest if applicable, and what is known as "opportunity cost" which is the interest I would have earned if the equity I have in my cars would have instead been in an interest bearing account.

I spent the first half of my life in Virginia. They had a significant personal property tax on cars there. They've since reduced it, and enacted exemptions where you don't pay tax on a certain amount of a car's value. So, I include property taxes as part of the cost of ownership. Here in Floriduh, personal property taxes are zero, nada, nicht, zip, goose egg.

I track what I spend maintaining my cars.

I've combined all of these costs into what I call "MDI&P," Maintenance, Depreciation, Interest, Property Tax.

Tracking the annual depreciation of my vehicles for literally decades, I've come up with a reasonably accurate rule of thumb for depreciation for cars driven about 12k miles per year: 25% the first year; 20% the years the cars go out of warranty, become seven model years old, and go over 100k miles; and 15% the remaining years. Lower annual mileage would result in lower annual depreciation.

Based on my first BMW, which I kept twelve years, I'm predicting that I will spend about $0.20/miles for maintenance and repairs in the out years, the fifth year and beyond.

Yep, all of the above goes into a spreadsheet, one where predicted data gradually gets replaced with actual data over time. The pertinent data is annual MDI&P/mile, and MDI&P/mile since new.

At the end of the fourth year (50.5k miles) my MDI&P since new was $0.99/mile. The fifth year is going to be great, MDI&P of maybe $0.46/mile. For the out years, barring any maintenance catastrophes, my annual MDI&P should average around $0.55/mile.

I don't include fuel and insurance as part of ownership cost, since they are mostly independent of the age of the car, but are dependent on other factors. These cost are part of "operating costs."

After seeing the same pattern in literally decades of cost data, I've become militant about keeping cars to somewhere around 100k miles. My lifetime average mileage on a car is around 110k miles, and my average period of ownership for cars bought new of somewhere around 8.5 years.

Combining my ownership costs (MDI&P), and my operating costs (fuel, insurance, and miscellaneous costs), at the end of my fifth year, my 2014 535i six-speed... :thumbup: ***8230;........ will be about... wait for it... $1.25/mile.

I've lowered my projected annual mileage on my car for the fifth year and beyond, from 12.5k miles to 10k miles. We're putting more miles on Frau Putzer's new X3 than on my old 535i. Lower annual mileage results in higher costs/mile, since part of the depreciation and maintenance costs are based on elapsed time. When I was predicting 12.5k miles in the fifth year, my estimated total cost since new after five years was $1.21/mile, as shown on the second spreadsheet.
 

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I found a 2015 535i and a 2015 528i I like. The 535 is a little over $5k more. $29.8k vs. $35k. They are both loaded. Msport, Lighting Package, Driver Asistance Package, Premium Package, and Aerodynamic Kit. The 535i has about 33k miles and the 528i has about 24k miles. I know the 535 has the 6 cylinder and thus more power. But other than that, the vehicles look identical.
Have you DECODED both VINs to verify they truly are equipped nearly the same. There are some pricey options (like DHP at $3500) that don't always show up in dealer's advertisements; and it's difficult to tell it's there unless you know what to look for in the cabin, under the hood or under the car.. Also dealers often list things in their ads that are NOT actually on the car-- tho not usually intentionally.

I'm with most others here in saying get the 535i. If you'd show the dealer with 535 the listing for the 528 and mention you'd pay $1500-2000 more for a six, but not $5k.

Like others have mentioned, both are priced a bit high-- there is room to wiggle on both.
 

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..Decades ago, I decided that the best way to quantify the ownership cost of cars was to consider them as assets, but assets that depreciate. That makes the annual depreciation an expense. Quantifying that annual expense is part of making financial decisions: What cars to buy? How long to keep them?
While perhaps an entertaining exercise in itself, I don't see how the ends justify the needs: If it was a business and one were writing off depreciating asset for tax purposes - sure. But for me, the instant I hand over cash (I don't buy on credit) the deal is done and the money is gone off my books forever. From that moment onward all that matters as far as the decision to keep the car is the $/mile trend line. Dollar amount being total cost including gas, insurance, speeding tickets, carnauba wax... As long as the trend line goes down I am a happy camper. My previous cars arrived into a sub $0.25/mile plateau where it became just unsustainable to operate them reliably, calling for a replacement.
 

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While perhaps an entertaining exercise in itself, I don't see how the ends justify the needs: If it was a business and one were writing off depreciating asset for tax purposes - sure. But for me, the instant I hand over cash (I don't buy on credit) the deal is done and the money is gone off my books forever. From that moment onward all that matters as far as the decision to keep the car is the $/mile trend line. Dollar amount being total cost including gas, insurance, speeding tickets, carnauba wax... As long as the trend line goes down I am a happy camper. My previous cars arrived into a sub $0.25/mile plateau where it became just unsustainable to operate them reliably, calling for a replacement.
So, if a tree fell on you six month old BMW, you wouldn't file an insurance claim because the car is "off your books?"

The more realistic and accurate the accounting method is, the better decisions will be that are made based on the data produced by the accounting method. My tracking of annual depreciation gives me a more realistic picture of what cars cost to own, year by year.

Vehicles and real estate are the only tangible items I consider financial assets. When I buy toys, furniture, consumer electronics, clothing, consumables, etc., I just consider them spending. I currently have a year's supply of cat litter, bought on sale a Sam's Club. But, it will not be listed as an asset on my December 31st spending sheet. Instead, it will just go on the books as 2018 spending.

Frau Putzer's 2018 BMW, however, will be on the December 31st balance sheet. It will only be worth about 80% of the MSRP though, because of nine month's of deprecation. When I consider how much it cost us to maintain our current lifestyle in 2018, the $11k or so that her car depreciated will be part of that total.

My beater, a 2007 Chevy Cobalt, with 118k miles on it, is now in the sub-$0.25/mile for current-year total costs (depreciation, maintenance, gas, insurance, tags). The since-new total costs have been around $0.40/mile. When the current-year costs per mile exceed the since-new costs per mile, yeah it's time to consider replacing the car. An exception is when you expect future current-year costs per mile to again be below the since-new costs per mile.
 

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So, if a tree fell on you six month old BMW, you wouldn't file an insurance claim because the car is "off your books?"
...
Vehicles and real estate are the only tangible items I consider financial assets. ...
Of course I will file the claim. If any money were to come in from the insurance settlement, they will be filed as an inflow in the overall transportation cost and subtracted from the cost of the replacement vehicle. This is a zero sum game at the end.

However the decision to include some but not other item categories among financial assets (aside from cash and precious metals) seems frivolous and emotional.
 

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I like Autoputzer's approach to vehicle cost analysis. I keep spreadsheets but only to keep track of the mileage when maintenance items are performed so I know when service is required. I don't include costs on the spreadsheet and I find Autoputzers analysis entertaining and educational.
 
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