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Discussion Starter #1
If so, I'd like to discuss certain career-related things...certifications, skills, etc.. I'm one but I definitely think I need to gain some more skills, maybe get certified (but don't know of any certifications for systems analysts in particular). Also wanna know if you know of any good forums out there targeted towards analysts.

Please reply or send me a PM and we'll get started...
:)
 

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Parking Spot Maven
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I don't know where you plan on going with certifications, but anyone in the position of hiring/promoting people in the field that even looks at certifications anymore is a cluebie. I've known people who have basically memorized books in different areas and been certified without ever even touching the equipment they were being tested on.

Real knowledge from actual experience is worth infinately more than even 50 certifications. If you interview for a job and the person hiring you asks for such credentials, you're probably in the wrong place. Granted, there are a handful of certifications that are worth their weight in gold (CCIE for example), but these are exceptions IMHO.

Just my two cents. Sorry I can't offer anything on the other stuff you are asking for, but I couldn't stop myself from saying something about the value (or lack thereof) of certifications these days. heh

Good luck. :D

--SONET
 

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SONET said:
I don't know where you plan on going with certifications, but anyone in the position of hiring/promoting people in the field that even looks at certifications anymore is a cluebie. I've known people who have basically memorized books in different areas and been certified without ever even touching the equipment they were being tested on.

Real knowledge from actual experience is worth infinately more than even 50 certifications. If you interview for a job and the person hiring you asks for such credentials, you're probably in the wrong place. Granted, there are a handful of certifications that are worth their weight in gold (CCIE for example), but these are exceptions IMHO.

Just my two cents. Sorry I can't offer anything on the other stuff you are asking for, but I couldn't stop myself from saying something about the value (or lack thereof) of certifications these days. heh

Good luck. :D

--SONET

I've been interviewing the last 2 weeks, and companies are still stuck on MCSE/MCSD certifications. It's hard not to get a frown on my face when they ask, because these are the phoniest, nonsense certs out there. A scam to earn Microsoft even more billions of $$. Anyone can memorize brain dumps, and pass the tests. It made for millions of "paper MCSE's". They flooded the market, and destroyed the image of the people that actually gained their position through experience and hard work.
 

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TMS
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What do you mean by systems analysis? Are you talking about the design of network plumbing, or constructing software applications? Certs might have more relevance for the former activity, but for the latter there is no substitute for experience. A certification for a software developer may be useful if (s)he is moving into a new technology and needs the cert to bolster a proven track record in other technologies.

In terms of software development, certs tend to be tool or vendor specific. I don't believe there are any certifying bodies for analysis and design techniques.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
SONET said:
I don't know where you plan on going with certifications, but anyone in the position of hiring/promoting people in the field that even looks at certifications anymore is a cluebie. I've known people who have basically memorized books in different areas and been certified without ever even touching the equipment they were being tested on.

Real knowledge from actual experience is worth infinately more than even 50 certifications. If you interview for a job and the person hiring you asks for such credentials, you're probably in the wrong place. Granted, there are a handful of certifications that are worth their weight in gold (CCIE for example), but these are exceptions IMHO.

Just my two cents. Sorry I can't offer anything on the other stuff you are asking for, but I couldn't stop myself from saying something about the value (or lack thereof) of certifications these days. heh

Good luck. :D

--SONET
You're probably right. I was just wondering if any kind of certification even exists for justifying at least a knowledge of OOA/D skills, UML, etc... maybe looking at the requirements, recommended material would at least point me in the right direction in terms of what else I should be learning, etc..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cliff3 said:
What do you mean by systems analysis? Are you talking about the design of network plumbing, or constructing software applications? Certs might have more relevance for the former activity, but for the latter there is no substitute for experience. A certification for a software developer may be useful if (s)he is moving into a new technology and needs the cert to bolster a proven track record in other technologies.

In terms of software development, certs tend to be tool or vendor specific. I don't believe there are any certifying bodies for analysis and design techniques.
Yea, I dont think there are certifications just for analysis and design. They are usually part of other certifications. One example I found was the jCert certification from IBM. It has a prerequisite test that needs to be passed: Test 486: Object Oriented Analysis and Design with UML. This is good enough. I can at least look at what it requires to pass this test and compare it with what I know and have experience in, and try to fill in the gaps...hopefully with more experience if I can get on the right projects, or at least by reading.
 

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TMS
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Teej said:


You're probably right. I was just wondering if any kind of certification even exists for justifying at least a knowledge of OOA/D skills, UML, etc... maybe looking at the requirements, recommended material would at least point me in the right direction in terms of what else I should be learning, etc..
None that I know of. Check Cetus Links for OO related links. In terms of reading, there's a book by Craig Larman that I like a lot: Applying UML and Patterns. That's an excellent place to start. Your next challenge is fiinding a job with an organization that embraces OO design techniques because there is nothing like direct experience.

I have a reading list that I put togeter for our VP of Info Systems a few years ago but it's on a network server somewhere and my VPN connection does not let me browse.

[EDIT]
Duh...I'll look for it when I'm in the office tomorrow. Send an email to my profile and I'll forward it to you. It's a Word doc.
[/EDIT]
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cliff3 said:


None that I know of. Check Cetus Links for OO related links. In terms of reading, there's a book by Craig Larman that I like a lot: Applying UML and Patterns. That's an excellent place to start. Your next challenge is fiinding a job with an organization that embraces OO design techniques because there is nothing like direct experience.

I have a reading list that I put togeter for our VP of Info Systems a few years ago but it's on a network server somewhere and my VPN connection does not let me browse.
That is the exact book I was looking at today!! In fact, it is one of the main recommended books for the IBM test I mentioned earlier. And you are right, its very hard to find an organization that really does follow a process when it comes to analysis and design. Sheesh I remember my first project at my old company...had to go to Boston to work with my bosses day and night to generate some design docs for the client. And this was after the freakin system was pretty much developed! They didn't have any sort of design docs before I joined the project...have no idea how the client went ahead with the project without actually seeing what they were getting!!! And since it was my first project and I was fresh out of college, I took my analysis and design books from my CIS classes back in Michigan...thank god I did!! My managers had no idea how to do the models, they were more or less drawing boxes and diamonds and circles wherever they looked good. If something didn't fit right, they just created their own symbol and stuck it in. I showed them some stuff from my books and boy were they impressed! In the end the design doc at least made some sense...

Obviously its much harder these days to find the kind of organizations I'm looking for, where I actually get some UML experience, follow a proper Unified Process or whatever....

Hey thanks for the info! :thumb:
 
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