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”X5e”

If you've been waiting to pick up one of these plug-in hybrid F15 X5 the preliminary pricing info is out. US MSRP will start at $63,095 (including $995 D&H fee), the rest of the pricing details are not out yet, but pricing should be inline with the gasoline offerings listed in the current order and pricing guides.

The BMW X5 xDrive40e, the company’s first plug-in hybrid Sports Activity Vehicle, charts the next chapter of BMW’s ongoing EfficientDynamics initiative. Benefiting from the groundbreaking work by BMW i on electromobility, the X5 xDrive40e combines the company’s award-winning 2.0-liter TwinPower Turbo four-cylinder engine with an electric motor, powered by a lithium-ion battery, integrated into its 8-speed automatic transmission. This newest BMW SAV can travel approximately 13 miles on pure electric power, ideally suited to short commutes and quick trips around town. Working in concert, the gasoline engine and electric motor puts out 308 horsepower and produces 332 lb-ft, enough to propel the X5 xDrive40e from 0-60mph in just 6.5 seconds. As the name implies, it features BMW xDrive, the company’s intelligent all-wheel drive system, for optimal stability and traction under all circumstances and road conditions. Early preliminary estimates put US EPA mileage estimates at 55 MPGe. The 2016 BMW X5 xDrive40e will arrive in US showrooms in the fall of 2015.

Read more about the 2016 BMW X5 xDrive
 

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2 times more epa seems promising, but at a cost of almost $15 more, so to balance that extra cost you may need to run that car for 25 years at least
 

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Total cost of ownership

2 times more epa seems promising, but at a cost of almost $15 more, so to balance that extra cost you may need to run that car for 25 years at least
Even with large "federal allowances" (really just another way the rest of us get to pay for someone else going green) unless the hybrid has lots of options built into that elevated MSRP the pay-back is probably at least a decade or even longer. And then there's the whole question of reliability - since post-warranty costs may be prohibitive what's the benefit to someone who in all probability is going to lease this beast for 24-36 months?

I'm not seein it :dunno:

However, if this is a continuation of test beds for alternative drive trains so in 8-10 years there are solid offerings then BMW should hand these out like penny candy and let BMW drivers run 'em hard and sort out all the (likely) bugs.

I'd volunteer :eek:
 

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2 times more epa seems promising, but at a cost of almost $15 more, so to balance that extra cost you may need to run that car for 25 years at least
A higher cost of $15 would be paid off in the first tank full - perhaps you meant $15,000, but as the base price of an xDrive 35i is $56,200, the stated base of the xDriver40e of $63,095 is $6,895 higher. A better comparison might be to the 35d, which starts at $57,700, so the 40e represents a $5,395 premium.

As for reliability, while hybrids have a number of components the 35i does not, they tend to be very reliable components as evidenced by hybrids in general. Alternatively, in comparison to the 35d, there is likely a reliability benefit to the 40e since it does not have the complexities associated with a diesel.
 

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I really don't get this X5. Electric only is for 13 miles, otherwise you are driving a 4cyl X5 and paying extra for it. Since the gas savings probably will never be seen, I'm not seeing why I would purchase this.
 

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I really don't get this X5. Electric only is for 13 miles, otherwise you are driving a 4cyl X5 and paying extra for it. Since the gas savings probably will never be seen, I'm not seeing why I would purchase this.
You are right you don't understand this X5. If you drive it on full electric power for 13 miles the battery is not dead. It still has a lot of energy left for acceleration. It just needs the engine running to power the car and charge the battery and keep enough charge so you have the electric power when it is needed. The full power from the engine and electric motor is always available when you need it.

Chuck
 

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We live in a small town with local trips of a couple of miles or so common, interspersed with trips of 50 miles or more. For those short trips we could be operating entirely on electric power with the advantages of reduced fuel cost (not really much since we're talking about little fuel being consumed) and no, or greatly reduced, short trip operation of the engine. For the longer trips the engine is there.

As for performance, the combined gas+motor power is considerably greater than our 35d and that breadth of the diesel power band can't compete with that of an electric motor.
 

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A higher cost of $15 would be paid off in the first tank full - perhaps you meant $15,000, but as the base price of an xDrive 35i is $56,200, the stated base of the xDriver40e of $63,095 is $6,895 higher. A better comparison might be to the 35d, which starts at $57,700, so the 40e represents a $5,395 premium.

As for reliability, while hybrids have a number of components the 35i does not, they tend to be very reliable components as evidenced by hybrids in general. Alternatively, in comparison to the 35d, there is likely a reliability benefit to the 40e since it does not have the complexities associated with a diesel.
I hope no one has to replace the battery out of warranty - that will be a very large service bill
 

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I hope no one has to replace the battery out of warranty - that will be a very large service bill
True, however, over the 18 years hybrids have been produced and sold, battery failures or even wearing out have been very rare. The battery replacement market for the largest producer of hybrids, Toyota, has been extremely small, limited mostly to taxis with hundreds of thousands of miles and a more arduous duty cycle than private vehicles.

That said, the 40e does use lithium-ion batteries rather than the nickel metal hydride that comprises most of that experience, but Li batteries have seen increasing use in hybrids for a few years now, indeed, the next generation of Prius is going to offer them as an option (over NMH).
 

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I really don't get this X5. Electric only is for 13 miles, otherwise you are driving a 4cyl X5 and paying extra for it. Since the gas savings probably will never be seen, I'm not seeing why I would purchase this.
The two motors work together to give you more power. Yes, you can drive it on eDrive only but that isn't the main point of the hybrid. Read more about it here -

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=765686

Tim
 

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Has there been any informed speculation out there that the X5e may come in additional color options? I'm assuming what's in the pricing and ordering guides for the non-hybrid X5 will also apply to the hybrid -- but I'm hoping there might be something new to go with the new model.

I have to replace a Lexus RX 450h that's coming off lease this fall, and I've been closely following reports of the X5e and looking forward to detailed reviews of the twin engine performance.
 

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I have to replace a Lexus RX 450h that's coming off lease this fall, and I've been closely following reports of the X5e and looking forward to detailed reviews of the twin engine performance.
We had an RX 450h, trading it in for our first Bimmer after only 2-1/2 years due to a rude surprise regarding their vulnerability due to poor design of a specific component (long story), but prior to that I was very impressed with how well the hybrid system worked. It provided a significant increase in fuel efficiency and a significant boost in power over the engine alone. Put your foot into it and when the motors kicked in at full tilt, the 450h takes off. Yes, only for a limited time, but for most of us maximum or any where near maximum power is only needed for short periods of time.

While the 450h was, in many respects, very good, I find the X5 to be clearly superior in a number of respects, the two most important to me being engaging to drive and that its design better reflects an engineered approach. Best example of the latter is the infotainment system. While that in the 450h worked well in some respects, in many its operation was frustrating and I had to wonder how in the world it ended up like this. By comparison, iDrive seems as if it's been designed from a logical, commonsense approach and is much more usable.
 
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