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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi folks,

I just had my F15 (diesel) come back from a first service. When I open the engine hood just to inspect how "clean" it would be but guess what I saw? Ad blue fluid are everywhere from top to bottom.

I called the SM and he ask me to email him those pictures but he is not getting back to me. I am planning to a worst case scenario to clean them by myself. How can I clean the adblue (urea) completely and not damaging the parts inside the engine bay.

Another question is, was it just me or you too have the same experience? Should I never go back to this dealer?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Remind them that Ad Blue /urea is highly corrosive. And if their technicians don't know that, they need training. If you have the time, just drive in, and pop up the hood in front of everyone. That will get attention.

When the engine is cool, I would use water and for now, and remove as much as possible, especially if on painted surfaces. If that does not work, consider a spoonful of dishwashing liquid to a about a gallon, and a soft brush. Runs of with a gentle spay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Matt, I figure that urea (ammonium) is highly corrosive and I hate that the SA is arguing with me saying adblue is not corrosive! Moreover he says every time adding adblue will have spill out like this. Why tying to talk me down with non-sense, I was really frustrated that he treated me like I was 12 year old.

I don't want to accuse him if it is true that every adblue process will end up like this? So please share with me your experience with me? Thank you.
 

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I'd talk to the service manager, because your SA is talking nonsense. Urea is even corrosive for some stainless steel, let alone carbon steel. In fact, it is even corrosive on aluminum, copper and zinc (a component of stainless steel alloys). Non-painted surfaces are most at risk, and any wire connectors that don't have waterproof seals.

The service person must have been very incompetant because the bottles sold by MB and BMW come a spring loaded value to avoid spilling. If you want to make a stink and a point, go to the parts dept first, buy a bottle of BMW ad blue, unscrew the top and turn it over on the SA's desk. Not a drop will drop. It is designed to avoid a single drop of spill for the very reason that it is corrosive. You can keep the bottle in your garage...also read on below for reusing the bottle in the future.

For now, I would hose off the crystal build up.

As you are in Nor Cal, I am afraid to ask which dealer, but a PM would be great.

This guy has a nice trick for reusing the BMW Adblue bottle by turning into a spill proof funnel...just buy the cheapest ISO-22241 certified fluid and a bottle of BMW ad blue and you are good.

p.s. I would edit your original post in the advanced editor and rename the title to include ad blue...it will be more informative for other forum members.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2G8wXLtPzTI&spfreload=10
 

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Wow, spooky!
 

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Returned home after first service today.
Popped the hood and ad-blue around caps and a small amount splashed just next to caps.
Filled a 16 oz bottle with WARM water and it just melted away, no problem.
 

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returned home after first service today.
Popped the hood and ad-blue around caps and a small amount splashed just next to caps.
Filled a 16 oz bottle with warm water and it just melted away, no problem.
+1.
 

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While the mess the dealer left is inexcusable, it will wash off readily with water as urea is highly soluble in water. A light spray from a hose will completely remove it. And, while it is corrosive, it won't be a problem if removed in any kind of reasonable time period (and even then, one exposure would have negligible effect).

The tech's don't use the 1/2 gallon DEF bottles with shut-off valves, instead using 2-1/2 gallon bottles, with no valve, filling through a funnel. Since the only way one can see if the tank is full is when the DEF backs up into the funnel, there is invariably some degree of overfilling. The small overflow trays surrounding the fill ports drain to their respective tank. This has its limits, of course.
 

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While the mess the dealer left is inexcusable, it will wash off readily with water as urea is highly soluble in water. A light spray from a hose will completely remove it. And, while it is corrosive, it won't be a problem if removed in any kind of reasonable time period (and even then, one exposure would have negligible effect).

The tech's don't use the 1/2 gallon DEF bottles with shut-off valves, instead using 2-1/2 gallon bottles, with no valve, filling through a funnel. Since the only way one can see if the tank is full is when the DEF backs up into the funnel, there is invariably some degree of overfilling. The small overflow trays surrounding the fill ports drain to their respective tank. This has its limits, of course.
Exactly!
 

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Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) is a non-hazardous solution, which is 32.5% urea and 67.5% de-ionized water. DEF is sprayed into the exhaust stream of diesel vehicles to break down dangerous NOx emissions into harmless nitrogen and water.

The easiest way to spot bad DEF is by looking at it. DEF is naturally clear, so if the solution looks cloudy or colored in any way, it's probable that it's old or has been contaminated.

AdBlue is a diesel exhaust fluid used in vehicles with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology to reduce harmful gases being released into the atmosphere. AdBlue is a 32,5 % solution of high-purity, synthetically manufactured urea in de-mineralized water. It is a safe-to-use fluid.

Garages should refill AdBlue as part of a diesel car's routine servicing. However, it's possible to refill a tank of AdBlue yourself. Some service stations have AdBlue dispensing pumps.

Finding out whether you have an adequate amount of AdBlue® in your tank is usually straightforward enough – an amber dashboard warning light will typically alert you when your tank needs a refill.

Also, if you are looking to buy AdBlue in South Africa, then you must visit Airnox Pty Ltd, they are one of the best AdBlue suppliers in South Africa.
 
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