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Hi All. I am looking for the spare wheel for the X5 E70.. the size is 155/90/R18. I already have the foam wheel kit with the jack and iron. just need the wheel and tire.

I live in North Vancouver BC.. Thx.
 

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I bought the wheel from ECS and the tire from Discounttiredirect.com. That was the lowest cost combo I could find a few months back. Being in Canada may change the economics, though.

While easy to mount if you have decent tire irons, the tire's relaxed position had both beads touching each other. I had a significant struggle getting the beads to push out and seat. If I was to do it over, I'd probably put something between the beads to spread them for a few days before mounting.

AM.
 

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Hi All. I am looking for the spare wheel for the X5 E70.. the size is 155/90/R18. I already have the foam wheel kit with the jack and iron. just need the wheel and tire.

I live in North Vancouver BC.. Thx.
Yeah I also need that wheel plus a roof carrier (and kit to bolt it onto the roof carrier). My E70 is the 7-seat, so this is my only option.

Sent from my SM-A135F using Tapatalk
 

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I bought one a while back but it took quite a bit of hunting as it was a rare factory option so far as I can tell. Ended up finding one on car-part.com and having it shipped to AB from a salvage yard in Nova Scotia. Was like $120 shipped.
 

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Also interested in the same as I currently bought a 5 seater instead of more popular 7 seater so that I would have that spare wheel space available. Mine has 20 inch wheels on it and I couldn't even find a 20 inch version for E70 specifically, it seems to only be available for the newest gen X5s, is it backwards compatible by any chance?

Also on the same subject - how well do the run flats behave in the flat tire situation? Basically what is the likelihood of ever needing the spare wheel?
 

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Also interested in the same as I currently bought a 5 seater instead of more popular 7 seater so that I would have that spare wheel space available. Mine has 20 inch wheels on it and I couldn't even find a 20 inch version for E70 specifically, it seems to only be available for the newest gen X5s, is it backwards compatible by any chance?

Also on the same subject - how well do the run flats behave in the flat tire situation? Basically what is the likelihood of ever needing the spare wheel?
The wheels for the latest BMWs are not compatible with the e70 X5 series without modification of some type. The new "G" generation X5s have a totally different wheel spec.

The e70 X5 has:
  • 5x120 wheel bolt pattern
  • 74.1mm wheel hub
The g05 X5 has:
  • 5x112mm wheel bolt pattern
  • 66.6mm wheel hub

In regard to size of the spare...BMW started using a different size spare mounted to a sometimes different wheel back around the 2003 model year. Prior to that...the spare was always the same style as the other 4 wheels mounted to the car...and if you had a staggered setup...the spare would be the same as the front (smaller) wheels.

Then in 2003 (which was the first time I remember seeing it)...BMW started using the smaller wheel/tire combo mentioned in the owners manual...regardless of which wheels were optioned on the vehicle. Granted, all of the recommended tire sizes (ie 17"/18"/19"/20"/21"/etc) have the same overall circumference/diameter...so even if you have 21" tires on all 4 corners...you can still run the smaller recommended tires sizes if mounted to a comparable wheel of the right width and circumference. (this is what plus sizing & minus sizing is about)
 
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Also interested in the same as I currently bought a 5 seater instead of more popular 7 seater so that I would have that spare wheel space available. Mine has 20 inch wheels on it and I couldn't even find a 20 inch version for E70 specifically, it seems to only be available for the newest gen X5s, is it backwards compatible by any chance?

Also on the same subject - how well do the run flats behave in the flat tire situation? Basically what is the likelihood of ever needing the spare wheel?
Run-flat tires will run flat, but they also self-destruct in the process and they're only safe for about 50 miles. The vast majority of punctures result in slow leaks. TPMS or FTM will warn you when the pressure in one tire goes down about 20% from the baseline pressure. Ideally, you get the warning and find a safe place to install the spare tire.

If you have a spare tire, you're delayed about 30 minutes before continuing on to your destination. Without a spare, you can limp 50 miles and then new a new tire. If you're more than 50 miles from your destination, you're not going to your destination.

Here's what can happen on a weekend road trip with run-flats and no spare tire, the sad tale of the F25 X3 owner and his $1400 flat tire:

(100) The cost of no spare tire! | BimmerFest BMW Forum

Most fast leaks started out as slow leaks that were ignored or undetected. I check and adjust my tire pressures every two or three weeks, and before and after a day on a road trip. I do this in the early morning when the car and tires are completely cooled off, and before sunlight heats any of the tires. I set the pressures in the two tires on an axle to be exactly the same (needle of the gauge right on a hashmark on the dial face). If there's a significant difference in the pressures of the tires on an axle the next tiime I check, I go looking for an embedded foreign object. Doing this, I catch slow leaks when and where it's easy and safe to deal with them (my driveway or a hotel parking lot).
 

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Run-flat tires will run flat, but they also self-destruct in the process and they're only safe for about 50 miles. The vast majority of punctures result in slow leaks. TPMS or FTM will warn you when the pressure in one tire goes down about 20% from the baseline pressure. Ideally, you get the warning and find a safe place to install the spare tire.

If you have a spare tire, you're delayed about 30 minutes before continuing on to your destination. Without a spare, you can limp 50 miles and then new a new tire. If you're more than 50 miles from your destination, you're not going to your destination.

Here's what can happen on a weekend road trip with run-flats and no spare tire, the sad tale of the F25 X3 owner and his $1400 flat tire:

(100) The cost of no spare tire! | BimmerFest BMW Forum

Most fast leaks started out as slow leaks that were ignored or undetected. I check and adjust my tire pressures every two or three weeks, and before and after a day on a road trip. I do this in the early morning when the car and tires are completely cooled off, and before sunlight heats any of the tires. I set the pressures in the two tires on an axle to be exactly the same (needle of the gauge right on a hashmark on the dial face). If there's a significant difference in the pressures of the tires on an axle the next tiime I check, I go looking for an embedded foreign object. Doing this, I catch slow leaks when and where it's easy and safe to deal with them (my driveway or a hotel parking lot).
Makes sense. So all in all it's still better to have the spare, that way at the very least you don't end up destroying the punctured run flat and you are able to get further to fix it.
 

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Makes sense. So all in all it's still better to have the spare, that way at the very least you don't end up destroying the punctured run flat and you are able to get further to fix it.
I'm militant about my vehicles having spares. That's especially true because I use them for road trips. That means no BMW hybrids, i-cars (electrics), M-cars,or 4 Series coupes (2-doors), Teslas, or Porsche Carrera/Carrera S's for me.

The previous 911 offered a spare tire that rode in the back seat. But, the 992's rear tires have a greater rolling diameter than the front tires. The same is true of the current M2 and M3/4. A one-inch difference in rolling diameter on the rear axle (where most punctures occur) would play hell with the limited slip differential, possibly causing permanent damage to the clutches.
 

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I also carry a plug kit and a 12V air compressor which allow me to deal with the common puncture wound without messing with my spare tire. I went many years never needing to use a spare because of this, until a year or so ago when I had two flats on the same 150 mile trip (one was on my jet ski trailer). Neither was "pluggable" and required mounting spare tires. Just when you think you'll never need one!

AM.
 

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I'm militant about my vehicles having spares. That's especially true because I use them for road trips. That means no BMW hybrids, i-cars (electrics), M-cars,or 4 Series coupes (2-doors), Teslas, or Porsche Carrera/Carrera S's for me.

The previous 911 offered a spare tire that rode in the back seat. But, the 992's rear tires have a greater rolling diameter than the front tires. The same is true of the current M2 and M3/4. A one-inch difference in rolling diameter on the rear axle (where most punctures occur) would play hell with the limited slip differential, possibly causing permanent damage to the clutches.
So what about the E70's rolling diameter? Because my front tires are 275/40 R20 and rear 315/35 R20. Does that mean that front and rear rolling diameter differs making the spare tire pointless?
I was looking at this one: BMW X5 (2007-2017) 18" | Space Saver Wheel | The Wheel Shop
 

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So what about the E70's rolling diameter? Because my front tires are 275/40 R20 and rear 315/35 R20. Does that mean that front and rear rolling diameter differs making the spare tire pointless?
I was looking at this one: BMW X5 (2007-2017) 18" | Space Saver Wheel | The Wheel Shop
Your link doesn't say what size the tire is.

Here's a US company's E70 spare tire kit. I comes with a 165/90-18 tire. That's actually a theoretically one-inch larger rolling diameter. But, that spare tire would likely deform more under loa than the outisde tires.

BMW E70 X5 N55 3.0L Wheels Emergency Spare - 3611676886115590 - 18" Emergency Spare Wheel/Tire Set (ecstuning.com)

RealOEM.com lists the E70 spare tire as being a 155/90-18, which would be (theoretically) closer to the outside tires' rolling diameter.

RealOEM.com - Online BMW Parts Catalog

Real OEM shows an aluminum spare wheel that has superseded the stamped steel wheel.

Font Rectangle Parallel Number Screenshot


Frau Putzer's G01 X3's OE spare tire is a significantly smaller rolling diameter than the outside tires. Buried deep in some BMW technician training material, I found a blurb that the G01 X3's xDrive logic can detect when the spare tire is installed and then opens (disconnects) the clutches that send power to the front wheels. I wouldn't assume that's the case with earlier platforms like the E70. If we ever get a flat tire, I'll put the spare on the front for that reason.

Maybe some E70 owners with an OE (factory) spare tire could chime in with their spare tire's actual size. The E70 owners manual might also list the correct spare tire size. BMW owner manuals were more complete back then.

As a guess, I'd say the 155/90-18 is the correct size spare tire.
 

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Your link doesn't say what size the tire is.

Here's a US company's E70 spare tire kit. I comes with a 165/90-18 tire. That's actually a theoretically one-inch larger rolling diameter. But, that spare tire would likely deform more under loa than the outisde tires.

BMW E70 X5 N55 3.0L Wheels Emergency Spare - 3611676886115590 - 18" Emergency Spare Wheel/Tire Set (ecstuning.com)

RealOEM.com lists the E70 spare tire as being a 155/90-18, which would be (theoretically) closer to the outside tires' rolling diameter.

RealOEM.com - Online BMW Parts Catalog

Real OEM shows an aluminum spare wheel that has superseded the stamped steel wheel.

View attachment 1076046

Frau Putzer's G01 X3's OE spare tire is a significantly smaller rolling diameter than the outside tires. Buried deep in some BMW technician training material, I found a blurb that the G01 X3's xDrive logic can detect when the spare tire is installed and then opens (disconnects) the clutches that send power to the front wheels. I wouldn't assume that's the case with earlier platforms like the E70. If we ever get a flat tire, I'll put the spare on the front for that reason.

Maybe some E70 owners with an OE (factory) spare tire could chime in with their spare tire's actual size. The E70 owners manual might also list the correct spare tire size. BMW owner manuals were more complete back then.

As a guess, I'd say the 155/90-18 is the correct size spare tire.
I too found some other sources stating 155/90 R18 as the size. I also found what seems to be the BMW part number for it: 36110007376. But of course it's nowhere to be found to buy. So it looks like it's either nothing or the one I linked which looks generic and measurements are unclear.
 

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TireRack.com, the largest tire retailer in the US, shows one brand, Khumo, in that size and that they have just three in stock.

Tire Size 155/90R18 | Tire Rack

Frau Putzer kept a Honda twelve years, selling it to a friend. I tried to find a new spare tire for it, for safety reasons. The size was no longer made.

I had an eight-year-old spare fail the first time I tried to drive on it. I generally keep cars no longer than twelve years. My practice now is to replace spare tires after six years before they fail and hopefully while they're still being made.
 

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So what about the E70's rolling diameter? Because my front tires are 275/40 R20 and rear 315/35 R20. Does that mean that front and rear rolling diameter differs making the spare tire pointless?
I was looking at this one: BMW X5 (2007-2017) 18" | Space Saver Wheel | The Wheel Shop

Hey man, you're confusing some stuff here.

R stands for the rim diameter and the rim diameter can vary (for example I could run 18in up front and 21in in the rear or swapped) so long as the overall rolling circumference remains the same. You can calculate this by taking the (rim diameter + 2* tire width * aspect ratio) 2 PI. (edited because I gave you area in my stupor lmao)

In your staggered setup, you have different width (275 vs 315) but the overall diameter for the 315 and 275 is 508mm. If I'm not wrong, the transfer case allows for a variance of 1% (basically tread difference, imagine the worse case scenario where one axel is completely worn and the other axel is brand new, the car should still run okay). If it helps, I have both the staggered 20s and square 18s for the winter. Both can be used interchangeable without issue.

The spare is a compact tire meaning that it'll be a portion of the width of the main tire but overall rolling diameter should/need to match the rest.

To answer your other question, can a run flat be repaired: Most places will say no but this is dependent on how far you've run the tire flat. In the case of sudden blowout, your tire is good as gone as it's impossible to stop the tire the moment it pops. If it's a slow leak, then yes, if you can find the leak and it's in a good spot, it's repairable


I do have an OE spare I'll look up in the morning.
 

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Hey man, you're confusing some stuff here.

R stands for the rim diameter and the rim diameter can vary (for example I could run 18in up front and 21in in the rear or swapped) so long as the overall rolling diameter remains the same. You can calculate this by taking the (rim diameter + tire width * aspect ratio) ^2 * PI.

In your staggered setup, you have different width (275 vs 315) but the overall diameter for the 315 and 275 is 508mm. If I'm not wrong, the transfer case allows for a variance of 1% (basically tread difference, imagine the worse case scenario where one axel is completely worn and the other axel is brand new, the car should still run okay). If it helps, I have both the staggered 20s and square 18s for the winter. Both can be used interchangeable without issue.

The spare is a compact tire meaning that it'll be a portion of the width of the main tire but overall rolling diameter should/need to match the rest.

To answer your other question, can a run flat be repaired: Most places will say no but this is dependent on how far you've run the tire flat. In the case of sudden blowout, your tire is good as gone as it's impossible to stop the tire the moment it pops. If it's a slow leak, then yes, if you can find the leak and it's in a good spot, it's repairable


I do have an OE spare I'll look up in the morning.
I just thought that difference in height - 40 vs 35 will mean difference in the outer diameter, but I guess I was wrong. So it looks like that spare tire I was looking at is worth getting, provided it's actually 155/90 R18.
 

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Here's an explanation of what the numbers mean:

View attachment 1076071

There are 25.4mm in one inch. So, the rolling diameter in inches is:

(wheel diameter) (inches) + 2 x (aspect ratio) x (1/100) x (tire width) (mm) / 25.4

= 18 + 2 x 90 x (1/100) x 155 / 25.4 = 28.98 inches
I got in touch with the seller of the spare wheel (BMW X5 (2007-2017) 18" | Space Saver Wheel | The Wheel Shop) and the reply was that the dimensions are 155/85 R18 with outer diameter being 28.4''. So the height is not 90 but 85. Would you say it's still worth getting this one? I couldn't find anything else, not in UK at least.
EDIT: The outer diameter of my tires (according to an online calculator) is 28.7'', so it's close enough?
 

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I'd try to find a 155/90-18 tire if you can. Any difference in the average rolling diameters between the front and back axle will put a slow steady grind on the clutches in the xDrive transfer case. BMW spec's 2mm maximum difference in tread depth (a difference of 4mm in rolling diameter). This is from TIS, BMW's electronic shop manual:

Font Parallel Screenshot Rectangle Number


It's a national holiday today in the US, Thanksgiving. But, you could see it Tire Rack (TireRack.com) will ship a tire to the UK? Tire Rack has two 155/90-18's in stock with more arriving Monday.

You could also try a Kumho dealership in the UK.
 

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I'd try to find a 155/90-18 tire if you can. Any difference in the average rolling diameters between the front and back axle will put a slow steady grind on the clutches in the xDrive transfer case. BMW spec's 2mm maximum difference in tread depth (a difference of 4mm in rolling diameter). This is from TIS, BMW's electronic shop manual:

View attachment 1076129

It's a national holiday today in the US, Thanksgiving. But, you could see it Tire Rack (TireRack.com) will ship a tire to the UK? Tire Rack has two 155/90-18's in stock with more arriving Monday.

You could also try a Kumho dealership in the UK.
OK, I get it now. So I buy the spare wheel with the 155/85 R20 tyre, then buy the 155/90 R20 tyre, replace the original one with it and all good. In that case it's not a problem, there's plenty 155/90 R20 tyres sold without the rim. The rim is still the same anyway, right?
 
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