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Discussion Starter #1
Folks - Looks like I'm in need of new rotors and pads on all 4 corners :(

Where are you folks ordering from ? I looked at FCP Euro but they don't have the front rotors ? Only 4 options for the rear :dunno:
 

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I buy Brembo rotors at Canadian Tire. They sometimes have a buy one get the other one 50% off deals. Then I get the pads at either Bavauto.com or the stealership. I don’t put wear sensors on. I “shorted” the ones on the car right now to fool the computer that they’re new. I just feel that I don’t need them as I have my own lift at my workplace and I check the brakes often.


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Discussion Starter #6
I buy Brembo rotors at Canadian Tire. They sometimes have a buy one get the other one 50% off deals. Then I get the pads at either Bavauto.com or the stealership. I don’t put wear sensors on. I “shorted” the ones on the car right now to fool the computer that they’re new. I just feel that I don’t need them as I have my own lift at my workplace and I check the brakes often.
So the rotors from CTire are $104.99 each, on sale right now. Even if I do that and buy the pads elsewhere (which will then generate a shipping charge), I'm only looking at saving MAYBE $80.00 on the whole package, as opposed to ordering a complete kit (pads, rotors, senors) from RockAuto (Z23 Evolution Geomet kit).

..... Sigh. lol
 

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Back when brake drums and expanding shoes were king, the Europeans came up with the disk brake idea (Rotors and pads) It was heavily promoted in the US motor press that with disk brakes, all you needed to do was flip the calipers out of the way, pop in a new set of pads and be on your way. Cheap date. In practice, you can't get away with just new pads. They want to replace rotors no matter how good they might be.

In 1986, I had a 1986 Volvo 240DL wagon. Before the pads started scratching the rotors, I went to the dealer and asked to have just the pads replaced. They were barely worn. You'd think that I asked them to give up their first born son child, They refused to do the job if they couldn't replace the rotors with new ones unless I signed my life away. Which I did and never had any problems. I owned many Ford E-150 work vans for my business. Those rotors had a tendency to overheat and create hot spots and iron nodules on the rotors. They had to be replaced.

So after all of the hype over the savings advantages of disk brakes and just changing pads, what happened? Is this just another example of there should be a requirement for the jar of Vaseline and the trousers with the whole in the back? With my Ford vans, anything over 25,000 miles was a rotor and pad replacement job. It needed it. My 2014 X-1 has plenty of pads left. No warning lights, no grinding rotors. Not even the pulsating of the brake pedal you get when the pad linings are almost gone. But the shop I went to says they only replace the whole works.

I'm not going back to the dealer because they seem to always forget to reset the service counter and I get warning about every 3 or 4 thousand miles that I need more service. At 75 years old, I don't drive this car like I might have at age 20. I don't use my left foot to use the brakes. My brake lights aren't constantly flashing like I see some drivers do. If someone wants to beat me to the next light, I just laugh at them. With the price of gasoline, knock thine self out.

Just curious.
 

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I'm with you. I had F150 that ran tight calipers and by time you got to it it was scoring rotor some. No problem, just put in new pads, and cleaned it up.

As to X1 s28i I caught rears half worn, and put $32 Centric ceramic Posi-quiet.

Works great, and less grabby.
 

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Rock Auto has stop tech parts on sale now.

Of course when one finds the part numbers Googling them will give many sellers and prices.
 

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Makes sense to me. If the rotors are "true" and not crooked or have iron hot spots, why grind them and resurface them? There's instructions now all over on how to break in just pads to existing rotors. Some of these Auto repair places are just licenses to steal from the public.

Anyone have any idea about what BMW says about the subject? I mean, anyone careful enough to change pads before they are grinding the rotors with the steel backing plates for the pads should be rewarded. Not penalized. I might have to go back to Fords. At least they give you the jar of Vaseline and the trousers with the hole in the back.
 

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My first E-150 Ford Van, 2004 ran tight pads on the rear. The first car I ever owned that wore out the back brakes first. And it wasn't from forgetting to take the E-Brake off. Just a ****ty proportioning valve.

Buying car is just another way for the crooks to get their hands in your pockets.
 

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I just picked up pads from the stealership for $264 CAD .... which is still cheaper than the shipping these sites have lol.

My replace front pads light came on which I found odd as when I inspected this thing just a few months prior it still had 7mm of pads. I did a quick visual and it still looks like 7mm ... until I took the tires off under suspicion that the sensor broke off when I drove it in a snow storm. Turns out the pads on the INSIDE were worn. So it’s a full brake service for me sometime this week.


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It was always my experience with my Ford disk brakes that it was the inside that had the wear. It had something todo with the location of the piston on the caliper and how it pushes against the rotor. But the inside always gets the most wear.

Interesting that your fronts went first. My 2004 Ford van was the first with disks on the rears. The proportioning valve was putting more pressure on the the rear pads went way sooner because the brake proportioning valve was putting way more pressure on the rear than the front.
 

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It was always my experience with my Ford disk brakes that it was the inside that had the wear. It had something todo with the location of the piston on the caliper and how it pushes against the rotor. But the inside always gets the most wear.

Interesting that your fronts went first. My 2004 Ford van was the first with disks on the rears. The proportioning valve was putting more pressure on the the rear pads went way sooner because the brake proportioning valve was putting way more pressure on the rear than the front.


This is actually my 2nd brake change. The first ones wore a bit more evenly. My rear brakes are due soon as they’re at 5mm and they actually wore evenly. Perhaps I just had a warped rotor.


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It was always my experience with my Ford disk brakes that it was the inside that had the wear. It had something todo with the location of the piston on the caliper and how it pushes against the rotor. But the inside always gets the most wear.

Interesting that your fronts went first. My 2004 Ford van was the first with disks on the rears. The proportioning valve was putting more pressure on the the rear pads went way sooner because the brake proportioning valve was putting way more pressure on the rear than the front.
Inside gets wear because the caliper pins hold caliper tight, and inside pads push, but caliper has to slide to equalize piston force on outside pad.
 

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That's why you need to keep the surface that the caliper slide in and out on clean. If you don't, it might not retract fully and leave the pad to rub on the disk. I've seen some just push the piston back, flip the caliper over so they can get the assembly off, slap new pads in and put it all back together. There are no retractor springs like there were on drum brakes. Especially the rear ones that get the most road wash.

JMO.
 

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5MM left on the pads when you replaced them? That's barely worn. That's a 1/2 a CM. If you had 5 mm of pad left, you certainly didn't need new rotors. No wonder these Stealerships are roiling in money. Do you have any idea how thick the wear surface is on a new set of pads? I don't. And I don't have a set to compare using my inch/metric rule.
 

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5MM left on the pads when you replaced them? That's barely worn. That's a 1/2 a CM. If you had 5 mm of pad left, you certainly didn't need new rotors. No wonder these Stealerships are roiling in money. Do you have any idea how thick the wear surface is on a new set of pads? I don't. And I don't have a set to compare using my inch/metric rule.


I change mine at 4-3mm. Pad thickness depends on the brand. I work as a Toyota dealer mechanic and brand new Toyota pads are at 10-11mm new, then we call for replacement at 4mm and lower as they don’t have wear sensors. BMWs are slightly thicker at 11-12mm new. The biggest pads I’ve dealt with were on a Bentley Continental flying spur. They were also 12mm but the surface area of it! They make the Toyota Tundra ones look tiny. And the rotors had a bigger diameter than wheels of my then-Honda.


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