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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, has any one had trouble with Bridgestone tiers?
I had fitted 18" 255 35 RE050 90Y to both rear wheels on my sport tourer. The problem I am having is a swaying effect when changing lanes on good roads at 60 to 70 MPH.
This happened last time I had new tiers fitted and it did calm down a bit. In fact the less tread the better they were!

I am not sure it is tiers having more tread causing side play, over inflation of rear tiers (40 to 41PSI) or rear tracking causing issues!

When it sways it makes you feel unsafe and having both hands on wheel is advised.

The RE050 90Y is meant to be a better tier than the RE040 although RE050 are not recommended by BMW because the car was not tested on RE050 (Probably because they came out after the car had its testing done!)

The main difference is the RE050 is asymmetrical and not directional so you can s*** them side to side.

Personally I believe a good tier should drive well what ever car it is on! May be I am wrong!

Any advice is welcome! (I am sure some will say why did you get them for! But not being a tier expert and these were a good price for what I thought to be a sensible choice!)

cheers,
Paul.
 

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Rambling Wreck
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We have been quite satisfied with the several sets of Bridgestone S-03 and RE050A tires (or tyres, since you're across the pond) we've used on our cars over the years.

The RE050A RFTs and S-03s, as well as many other high performance tires, can have a tendency to follow the ruts/grooves in the road. This behavior is known as tramlining.
 

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Mod the driver
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Tramline

It is a known issue that these run flats do this. I have the same tires and it is annoying but I get used to it. It is most noticeable after switching off the snows. A poor alignment will make it worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi, thanks for your response. This is not like tramlining as that normally seems to be felt through the steering but this is rear end swaying! the tyres are RE050A 90Y Potenza and not the run flat tyre.

I did mean tyres! Sorry for the spelling!

The place I had them fitted is a quality place and I am sure if the tyres were not good for the car they would have refused to fit them!
Not sure if you know Jemery Clarkson from the program Top Gear out in the US but he popped in to the tyre place a few weeks back in Mercedes Diplomate for a laser track!! So a good place.

I think I will have the rear tracking checked to see if there are any problems but first lower the presures to see if that reduces it.

Cheers,
Paul.
 

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rear end sway

I too have experienced this "rear end swaying" which I'm attributing more to tramlining than anything else. The backend seems to move from side to side on the freeway which makes the car feel very nervous. I only noticed this issue when I switched from stock Bridgestone Potenza RE040 to Dunlop SP Sport Maxx tires on my '03 ZHP. I'm on my 2nd set of Dunlop rears and the sensation is still there. I haven't had the alignment checked yet though treadwear is even across the tread at all 4 corners and the car doesn't pull to one side. Rear tire life is dismal, only 13k miles (about average for most ZHPs?), fronts still with 60% tread at 15k miles.

I have to say, the straightline instability is very unsettling on the highway especially when there are longitudinal grooves in the road. However, I think it's tramlining from the increased grip and responsiveness of max performance tires. This effect isn't present on smooth uncambered roads.
 

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It's likely tread height from a new tire that you feel. The Blocks are much taller on a new tire and will have some squirm until the wear down a bit. Not uncommon on a lot of brands.
 

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straightline instability

Yes, the rear end squirm was definitely worse when the tire was new, but even worn down to 2/32", the sensation was still present.
 

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rear end "swaying"

I experienced the rear end swaying issue on my Acura TL - took it to the dealer and they installed a "bump stop" on the strut component to limit the sway phenomena - they had a TSB on it apparently. But I also noticed it most severely under "tramlining" conditions.
Hope this helps.:)
 

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.
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Hi, has any one had trouble with Bridgestone tiers?
I had fitted 18" 255 35 RE050 90Y to both rear wheels on my sport tourer. The problem I am having is a swaying effect when changing lanes on good roads at 60 to 70 MPH.
This happened last time I had new tiers fitted and it did calm down a bit. In fact the less tread the better they were!

I am not sure it is tiers having more tread causing side play, over inflation of rear tiers (40 to 41PSI) or rear tracking causing issues!

When it sways it makes you feel unsafe and having both hands on wheel is advised.

The RE050 90Y is meant to be a better tier than the RE040 although RE050 are not recommended by BMW because the car was not tested on RE050 (Probably because they came out after the car had its testing done!)

The main difference is the RE050 is asymmetrical and not directional so you can s*** them side to side.

Personally I believe a good tier should drive well what ever car it is on! May be I am wrong!

Any advice is welcome! (I am sure some will say why did you get them for! But not being a tier expert and these were a good price for what I thought to be a sensible choice!)

cheers,
Paul.
Your problem is that you bought a tier intead of a tire, or as y'all call it over there, tyre.
Tiers are inheritently unsafe, especially when they're overinflated (41psi? WTF, have you read the manual?) and driven with one hand.
If you must have a tier, then at least get the top one. Bridgestone does make top tier tires. :thumbup:
 

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Your problem is that you bought a tier intead of a tire, or as y'all call it over there, tyre.
Tiers are inheritently unsafe, especially when they're overinflated (41psi? WTF, have you read the manual?) and driven with one hand.
If you must have a tier, then at least get the top one. Bridgestone does make top tier tires. :thumbup:
That's tierrible.
 

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That's tierrible.
Yeah, my delivery wasn't that good. Timing sucked, as the OP had already realized his typo. :p:rofl:
 

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Have there been any further developments with this or other similar instances?

My rear tires are shot so I went to replace them. First set gave me a drastic uneasy feeling. Same rear swaying as mentioned above. The rear was swaying so bad it was downright dangerous. My DSC has come on TWICE recently at speeds above 70mph. It's almost like the rear tires are fighting each other for grip. Very strange.

Within days I returned to the tire joint to have a set of Bridgestone Potenza RE760 Sports mounted. Same sensation.

Three weeks ago my car tracked straight as an arrow with even wear across the rears, so I'm confident the alignment is still good. The only commonality here is that both of these new sets of tires I've tried are an asymmetrical tread. Until now I've only ran symmetrical tread patterns on the rear. At this point, I plan to return these RE760's to get a tire with symmetrical tread. Perhaps the Yokohama S.drive. Suggestions?
 

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I'm a DlCK! So what?
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I've used Yokohama Avid ENVigors and am currently using General GMAX AS-03's, both of which are budget-friendly all-season performance tires.

The Yokohamas saved my ass one morning (I made a thread about it on E46Fanatics) when a hairy situation popped up requiring some fast maneuvering. They were very fun to toss around in the twisties, but they aren't a PS2 or anything. For the money, they were extremely great tires.

The Generals are definitely better in the wet and are comparable in the dry. Tread life is extremely high and, after several thousand miles, I really haven't even seen the first signs of wear. They're pretty responsive as well, so that's always a plus. I also drove them through a snow/slush mix when we had that mess and they did better than I anticipated (deep treads are to thank for that). Hell... just a couple weeks ago, I started hydroplaning at 70 MPH, but I could "feel" the tires trying to channel the water through and I managed to keep control of the car.

[Sent from my Android Touchpad.]
 

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No, I'm not replacing all 4 tires at once. Obviously, it's RWD, so the rears experience far greater frictional forces than the fronts. As a result, the rears wear far more rapidly than the fronts. So here I am in a situation with Michelin PS2's on the front with >50% tread remaining. Time to replace the rears.

The ZHP was originally supplied with Michelin Pilot Sports (symmetrical tread). The second set of tires were Pilot Sports (both front and rear). I'm now running a set of PS2's on the front (asymmetrical tread) with a set of Nexen 3000's on the rear (symetrical tread). No problems at all.

Today: Still running the PS2's on the front. And I replaced the Nexen 3000's (symmetrical) on the rear with a set of Nitto Motivo's (asymmetrical) on the rear. Suddenly I'm experiencing a radical issue with the handling in the rear. It's downright dangerous at high speeds. I then replaced the Motivo's with the aforementioned Bridgestone Potenza RE760's (another asymmetrical tread). And I'm still experiencing the identical wayward rear end I had with the Motivo's.

The guys at Discount Tire swear I need an alignment... which is understandable. ...But not logical, given the summary I just explained. The tread wear on the Nexen's I just took off was even across all 4 blocks.

The only REAL difference here is that I attempted to swap out symmetrical tires for asymmetrical tires. I can't be the only one who has experienced this.
 

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I can't be the only one who has experienced this.
You're not. Mixing tires is the reason for your woes. There are so many variables at play here it's only logical the car would behave this way.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=136

Paragraph 1:

Drivers should avoid mixing tires with different tread patterns, internal constructions or sizes, and use identical tires on all of their vehicle's wheel positions in order to maintain the best control and stability.
 

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Mixing tires = Bad Juju.....:tsk:
 
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