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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys,

My 2011 128i (74K miles) recently started leaking radiator coolant from the cylinder hose (11-53-7-545-890). In an attempt to temporarly stop the leak I mistakenly over torqued and broke one of the bolts. Does anyone know whats involved fixing and if this could be done as a DIY project ? If not, how much would it normally cost to have it fixed by a mechanic? Also if anyone would happen to know a mechanic in the southern Maryland, or northern Virginia area that can extract the broken bolt I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks so much
Shawn

Ps Please see attached photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Update : Got the broken bolt out by a professional mechanic at S2 Dynamics located in rockville MD. No drilling was used, only heat was applied to get the bolt out for $135. I highly recommend S2 Dynamics for anyone living in the DC, MD, VA area. Very resonable price and well trained staff.
 

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What I would do is the following:

- remove the hose
- if you are lucky, you can use a vise grip (I use the original, as imitation are often disapointing)
- if not so lucky, I would punch with a center punch in the bulls eye center of the broken bolt).
Punching lightly at first and stretching it toward the center if off center (stretching by hiting
your punch diagonally
- drill smaller than the bolt (1/8" as an example). Be carefull to watch the depth (check on the
other hole, and put tape on your drill bit at the proper depth you want to go; you can stop at
about 1/8 from the end of the bolt)
- I like to use those kind of extractor below (tapping them a bit with a hammer so they grip in the hole you made)
- use loose nut around (between hole and bolt)
- try to unscrew with the extractor, be aware if it is too hard. Don't break the extractor.
- if it doesn't work, drill slightly bigger (make sure to stay smaller than the thread inner diameter)

Drilling at the exact center is key (and along the axis of the broken bolt obviously; check that you are 90deg from the surface in 2 perpendicular plan looking sideways at your drill bit).

Taking your time is the other key. You are already into it, take the time to don't dig yourself deeper into it. It is doable without a doubt.

As you drill bigger, the wall of the broken bolt become thinner and weaker. This should make it easier to remove (be careful of the hole thread though)

I like this type of extractor (not necessiraly this brand). It feels to me that they bite into the broken bolt strongly.
https://www.jumia.co.ke/generic-3x-...ide-broken-damaged-bolt-remover-11141576.html


I dont' like this kind of extractor. It feels to me they can't bite strongly, feels like it's rolling and slipping (from my experience).
https://www.engineersedge.com/manufacturing/screw_extractor_size_and_drill_13412.htm


Hoping this helps
 
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