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Sandlapper Chapter
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How do you know the diffrence? if it is cold or hot weather version. i did mine less than a year ago and it seen to be going bad again i live in the Bahamas and it is mostly hot here but i don't what version i installed.
The cold weather one is encased in a removable relatively smooth foam covering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
I can not edit my original post so here's an update. Someone else tried this and found it made the job much easier. Instead of removing the intake manifold and distribution piece, he removed the oil filter housing only. This is a lot less work and gave him much better access to the CCV. Plus it allows you to replace the OFH gasket, which is prone to leakage. I haven't done this but it made sense to me.
 

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i used fudmans technique on the ccv replacement, took me two hours in my garage, very helpful especially the return line on the manifold, did the practice on the bench and did exactly as explained . one of the best DIY !
 

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I just got this done thanks to the various DIYs here and elsewhere.

One problem.. I found a mystery o-ring under my car while everything was apart.



Its dimensions are 12mm outer diameter, 8mm inner diameter, 2mm thick. It's not the dipstick o-ring because that is about the same diameter as the nickel. I looked through some realoem diagrams which didn't help. It was clean and dry when I found it, so it was either in a non-dirty location or it fell off the new CCV.
 

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In case anyone has trouble on realoem.com finding WHERE to look for their car's CCV info:

Engine-->Cylinder Head
 

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12. Installing the connecting line is the most difficult. It requires you to rotate the line about 1/3 turn to lock the line onto the CCV (practice this connection process on the bench). The other hoses use the locking snap connectors that just insert and snap to lock. After trying for over 2 hours to assemble these parts in their location :mad:, I was unsuccessful and decided to modify the locking mechanism. Use a Dremel tool and a sanding cylinder to sand the two retaining ridges on the CCV nozzle smooth from about 1" long to about 1/3 inch long (see photo). This simply reduces the rotation required to lock the connecting line to about 1/8 turn (~45 degrees). Mark the spots with paint where the connecting line aligns with the CCV nozzle to aid in assembly (see photo). Insert the connecting line into the original position from above the intake manifold. Much wiggling and bending of the line is required to get it into place. Once the lower connection is in place, insert the CCV into place. Align the marks, insert the hose into the CCV and rotate the 1/8 turn. This whole process took 10 minutes (vs. over 2 hrs!) with a minimum of effort after modifying the parts! Insert the upper connection line to the engine nozzle until you hear a click. Insert the CCV screws and tighten.
I finished the installation tonight on the crankcase ventilation/oil separator and it wasn't too bad on my 2001 530i.

I quoted the above step because I was able to rotate the connecting line (#3 in the part blow-up) and get it connected without too much trouble and with no modification.

Playing around a bit, I found I was able to insert the top of the connecting line (the section with the right-angle snap connector and smaller offshoot) from under the engine and kind of rotate it in place. When you play with how this connects on the bench, you'll see why this is important as fudman alluded to above: it connects to the CV/OS and then to lock it into place, one rotates the line.

So with the connecting line in place ready to be rotated into proper position, I inserted the CV/OS into its spot. I then pushed the connecting line into the CV/OS and then rotated it up through the available hole and into position.

To the best of my ability and triple-checking, that connecting line was indeed locked snugly onto the CV/OS. I then bolted down the CV/OS and snapped on the other lines.

Funny thing, I think trying to get the vent pipe (#2 on the diagram) snapped onto the CV/OS was tougher than the connecting line for me. It probably took me 15 minutes but eventually I got the click.

My car has been in California since day one and I did see that dreaded "mayo" in some of the lines. My M54 engine also uses about a quart of oil per oil change (~7500 miles).

Anyway, thanks for a great write-up...everything did go smoothly. My engine is still apart as I'm now going to tackle the VANOS seal replacement next.
 

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Successful CCV repair on 2002 530i E39/M54

I successfully removed and replaced the CCV and all hoses using the DIY procedure posted by Fudman. This job was a royal pain and took about 12 hours; 1/2 day saturday and full day sunday. I had two areas of difficulty. One, removal of the hidden 10mm nut behind the intake throttle body securing the electrical junction box. I bought a 10mm socket w/swivel and was able to final get in a remove. Second was the re-attachment of the connector-line hose to the top port of the CCV. I had to modify the new CCV component as described by Fudman-- reduced the stab/twist locking detent from 1 inch to about .3 inches work for me as well. I used a 1/8 inch diameter endmill type cutting tool in my Dremel instead of a sanding stone. I labeled all of the electrical cable assemblies with file folder labels- worked great. Great write up by Fudman-. Thanks, BMW657.
 

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I changed my CCV today using Fudman's DIY in & found it worked very well. I have two suggestions to make.

I found that I didn't have to disconnect the 3 plugs to the top of the engine over toward the exhaust side which allows the harness to be pulled across. Actually, I couldn't get one of the plugs undone & in desperation tried leaving them connected. I had a little less freedom to move the wiring box but found it to be no big problem.

Best though, I have some pictures to describe a solution to that @#%^& connection tube that everyone complains about. I think some others may have tried to describe this method without pictures, but the sequence of steps was never clear for me.

I spent over an hour feeding it down into position & then trying to rotate the lock on the joint to CCV without coming even close. With this method it became a 1 minute job - just the connection tube that is, not the entire job. :D
Also, I didn't have to modify the locking connection as Fudman describes.

The trick was to detach the evap valve on the front of the manifold so the hard plastic vacuum hose to it could be flexed down out of the way. Here is what worked for me:
1 place new CCV in position
2 remove evap valve bracket from manifold and drop down out of the way
3 from under the manifold, push the connection tube onto the CCV. Picture01
4 rotate the connection tube around the joint to the CCV, the end going up to the distribution piece will swing easily up between the manifold runners. This locks the connection tube onto the CCV. Picture02 from top and Picture03 under the manifold
5 reattach evap valve bracket. Picuture04. I had to twist the valve on its rubber mount to get a screwdriver on one of the two the torx screws but there is lots of compliance, no damage done.

You will see from that pictures that I was doing my oil filter housing gasket so I had easier access than otherwise, I think though that this method would work with the oil filter housing in place.

Regards
RDL
 

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Seek to understand,^Value
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I'm trying to get a handle on the parts that are typically replaced during a CCV system overhaul as per this thread (see post #4):
- How to test the BMW E39 pressure-controlled crankcase ventilation system (CCV)?

I'm also confused about the part number for the M54 guide tube as per this thread (see post #29):
- E39 (1997 - 2003) > CCV replacement tips

Q1: Is this the right list of parts that are needed for the M54?

Total $220 to $235 for the following 7 to 8 items:

  1. Pressure regulating valve (cold weather version, 11617533400 = $66)
  2. Vent pipe (cold weather version, 11617533398 = $28)
  3. Connecting line (cold weather version, 11617533399 = $34)
  4. Vent hose (cold weather version, 11157532629 = $15)
  5. Return pipe (stock version is already insulated, 11617504536 = $34)
  6. Dipstick guide tube (redesigned version sans concentric rings, 11437531258 = $41)
  7. Dipstick guide tube lower o-ring (19.5x3mm, 11431740045 = $2)
  8. Vacuum hose black (not on all E39s = $15, e.g., not on the M54)
 

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Registered
2003 530i
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2,280 Posts
I'm trying to get a handle on the parts that are typically replaced during a CCV system overhaul as per this thread (see post #4):
- How to test the BMW E39 pressure-controlled crankcase ventilation system (CCV)?

I'm also confused about the part number for the M54 guide tube as per this thread (see post #29):
- E39 (1997 - 2003) > CCV replacement tips

Q1: Is this the right list of parts that are needed for the M54?

Total $220 to $235 for the following 7 to 8 items:

  1. Pressure regulating valve (cold weather version, 11617533400 = $66)
  2. Vent pipe (cold weather version, 11617533398 = $28)
  3. Connecting line (cold weather version, 11617533399 = $34)
  4. Vent hose (cold weather version, 11157532629 = $15)
  5. Return pipe (stock version is already insulated, 11617504536 = $34)
  6. Dipstick guide tube (redesigned version sans concentric rings, 11437531258 = $41)
  7. Dipstick guide tube lower o-ring (19.5x3mm, 11431740045 = $2)
  8. Vacuum hose black (not on all E39s = $15, e.g., not on the M54)
There is a kit available that combines a few parts
CCV repair kit 11 61 7 534 237
(includes)
vent valve 11 61 7 533 400
vent hose 12 61 7 533 398
connecting line 13 61 7 533 399

This past February, I paid $91 for the kit at
http://bmwpartssource.com/partlocator/index.cfm?siteid=216042

Regards
RDL
 

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Constantly Learning
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Ha, always save receipts! Blue, here's the list of parts I purchased from EAC late last year:

11617533400 Crankcase Vent Valve GENUINE BMW 65.42 1 65.42
11617533399 Crankcase Vent Hose GENUINE BMW 33.65 1 33.65
11617504536 Crankcase Vent Pipe GENUINE BMW 29.81 1 29.81
11431740045 O-Ring D P H 0.84 1 0.84
11157532629 Crankcase Vent Hose GENUINE BMW 15.19 1 15.19
11617533398 Crankcase Vent Pipe GENUINE BMW 27.85 1 27.85

If anything else was needed, Gary at Martin Motorsports never told me.
 
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