BimmerFest BMW Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First Post here,
Just a informational post on what happened to my E46.
Started the car and started to drive. It was about 25 degrees out. I live in upstate NY. Got about a mile down the road and it started to surge at 55 mph. I figured I maybe got some bad gas or something.( not likely) I put the car in sport mode and gave it some gas. It smoothed out and I put it back in regular mode. Started surging again. Then I noticed in my rear view mirror that I was making a massive smoke cloud behind me. I immediately thought of a frozen CCV and turned the engine off. I coasted and pulled into someones driveway, Luckily I was in a rural setting. I checked the oil and antifreeze. All looked OK. I tried to start it and it turned about 1/4 revolution and stopped. I remember reading about CCV causing hydrolocked or seized engines.
Had it towed to the dealer and told him my story. He said he's heard it before and that my diagnosis was probably right. Told me that the engine could be toast. Well, I was lucky. He said my quick thinking probably saved the engine...but not my pocketbook.
$750 labor and $400 parts including the cold weather CCV kit.
Service Tech wrote "118525 R&R Spark Plugs, extracted built up oil from cylinders, Replaced failed/frozen oil separator/CCV and all CCV hoses and dipstick tube with new style insulated parts for cold weather. Old valve had moisture in it and froze., causing crankcase pressure to push oil into the intake system, and hydrolock the engine."

I do lots of short drives and will probably add another oil change in the middle of winter. Usually do it every 6 months...spring and fall.
Reading this forum definitely informs e46 owners of potential problems.
 

·
Keeping it surreal
Joined
·
43,097 Posts
You actually did have another choice, you could have replaced that CVV with a catch-can....take a look at the Sticky Threads, it`s in there....
 

·
Kostspieliger Spaß Quandt
Joined
·
879 Posts
We the North - Don't lose an engine this Winter to the CCV
Every winter we lose many BMW's in the North due to the frozen CCV Oil Separator


Edit:
Hey Bobtrub - I've been collecting data on frozen CCV incidences for a number of years on BMW models prior to the move to the integrated oil separator diaphragm. Can you answer a couple of questions about your occurrence that I'll add to the data bank:

Year, model:
How long had the vehicle sat without starting (days or hours):
What were the approx ambient temps during that period (not just when you started to drive):
How long after starting the engine did you experience the vacuum relief:
 

·
Kostspieliger Spaß Quandt
Joined
·
879 Posts
You actually did have another choice, you could have replaced that CVV with a catch-can....take a look at the Sticky Threads, it`s in there....
The thread referenced in the sticky asks more questions than answers - it does have a particular good post however:

The problem with the CCV system is that it has to be calibrated for a certain Hg pressure value to work correctly with the engine. Point in case is the link in the very first post of this thread - to e46 Fanatics. The guy who did the homemade CCV system ended up recognizing quite a few shortcomings of his system. A BMW tech jumped in and mentioned it. In the end one of the MAJOR issues is the fact that the M54 engine is using low tension piston rings. He ended up disacrding the project. His system robbed the engine of low end power and the running values were off. Replaced the OEM CCV and and everything went back to normal. Due to the use of low tension piston rings.
A better design of the CCV system which can be easy serviced - yes. Removing it and replacing with a home brewed system - prolly doesn't work well. Sometimes BMW engineers Do know WTF they're doing.
The best permanent solution for an M54 engine is to replace the valve cover with the M56 and it's integrated CCV.
https://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=1120102

Alternately, use an oil pan heater pad.

What do you think happens to the vacuum in the CCV system when the gunk in the "separate" and "isolated catch can" freezes?
 

·
Keeping it surreal
Joined
·
43,097 Posts
What do you think happens to the vacuum in the CCV system when the gunk in the "separate" and "isolated catch can" freezes?
C`mon, man....you`re a pro, you know the routine....ANY system is only as "foolproof" as the "fool" who owns the car. Like most things of a mechanical nature, attention must be paid to that catch can, making sure it is reasonably clean at all times.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top