Bimmerfest BMW banner

1 - 20 of 65 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thanks to Fudman for his expert guidance and extra set of hands (or was I the extra set of hands) this afternoon. We did the Besian VANOS seal upgrade on my M54 four hours ago.
All went well, 100% you need the "special" tool to hold the fan mount in place while you "break" free the fan nut. Fudman's tool broke but we were lucky enough to find a machine shop to make the 12mm hole and 12mmx26mm slot for us on the spot... tool worked like a charm and we were back in business.

What I learned:
- approx. time: 4.5 hours (started at 11am, finished at 5pm including lunch and a 1.5 hour detour to remanufacture Fudman's fan tool)
- buying all the extra parts Besian suggests was not needed, but if you broke one of the plastic parts, you would need them.
- I did not replace the $37 oil feed line, mine was fine and we did not have time to locate the other end.
- the hardest part was the fan shroud (which cracked) and removing the fan blade
- the VANOS seals were not bad to install, mine were plastisized
- my valve cover gasket was like hard plastic, no wonder it seeped!
- seat of the pants, I would describe it as a great knife (my M54) was dull and I never knew it, now it has a sharp edge; feels more snappy from 1800-2600 just in town driving and at 80mph pulling from 3000-3600 feels alot stronger
- I used to have a very very slight "wobble" in my idle when I first started up from 975-1000; now smooth smooth smooth

Again, HUGE thanks to Fudman.
 

·
Conservative Modder
Joined
·
206 Posts
Excellent! Well done Hooray!

It gives instant satisfaction when firing it back up, I know.

:)
 

·
Wrenchin' fool ...
Joined
·
777 Posts
Congrats!

No worries for oscillating idle / jolts when the cold weather gets here.

Did mine 2+ winters ago ... rock solid idle in all temps.

Best thing I did for my touring, right along with rear carrier / subframe bushings.

FWIW, my indy who I mentioned it to a few years ago is now replacing them on every car (customer) he gets showing the symptoms. He was a skeptic, even after I did mine and demonstrated benefits (left at his shop overnight).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
Seth:
Glad you made it home alright! :thumbup: Block party is finally breaking up. Time for some serious shuteye. Let's get together and whack that little ball aroundd.
 

·
Seek to understand,^Value
Joined
·
25,199 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Seth:
Glad you made it home alright! :thumbup: Block party is finally breaking up. Time for some serious shuteye. Let's get together and whack that little ball aroundd.
Yes, no oil spots on the floor either! Fall golf is here, lets do it.

Just curious. Those tools are pretty hefty.

HOW did you break it?
Fudman fabricated his own using the dims posted here on a thread, it was 1.5mm thick stamped steel (pretty light duty), the 2nd revision started life as the hardened steel bar stock from a garage door opener (that part with all the holes drilled in it that the door quick disconnect attaches to), it was much closer to the 4mm thickness of those "beautiful" tools in your photo (need me some of those), have you used them yet for your cooling system or VANOS? ... and yes geezer, us east coast nuts are VERY hard to crack and on the equipment!

It gives instant satisfaction when firing it back up, I know.
You are 100% correct... I intuitively "knew" it should fire back up but I must admit there was a split second as I was about to turn the key waiting for some metal to shear through the front right corner of the hood!

No worries for oscillating idle / jolts when the cold weather gets here.
I had very very slight symptoms, some may not call them symptoms at all, in warm or cold weather, during the first 30 seconds of start up, my initial idle would never get above 1000rpm and there would be a few skipped beats in there. Will have to see what happens this morning, but yesterday I was surprised that the initial start up idle went up to 1300 then settled back down to 650 with no skipped beats (not one)... very very smooth. Driving it, best analogy is going from using a high end dull knife to a sharp one, the dull knife still feels great in your hand and cuts like hell but once you sharpen it you realize another level of performance. Cant wait to get my 9Jx18s on there, Fudman has me thinking about some new Sachs after driving his identical 530i with an all new front suspension... nice and tight.

How many miles are on it?
I bought it in February with 59,000 miles on it, now has 70337, my VANOS was more preventative then due to any issues. Glad I did it, the seals were rock hard like hard plastic vs. rubbery like the new o-rings and flexible like the new teflon seals.

All in all, not a job for the faint of heart, but if you can wrench and oil and coolant dont scare you, not a hard job, just a methodical process. We did not have any parts break coming apart or going back together. I can see how that would be a PITA if any of the 10+ electrical connectors blew apart. My CCV looked mayo free from the top side but we did notice the insulation on the one insulated hose is deteriorating (due to FL heat I suspect). Next is the CCV but Fudman was saying that IS a PITA compared to the VANOS... ahhh, another day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ps. I also popped in a new set of Bosch plugs from my local stealer on the reassembly, this may have helped things a little too, the old plugs looked good with a light tan ash on them but I did notice the cylinder closest to the windshield was almost a white ash vs. the one nearest the radiator with was the darkest tan of the bunch, coincidence?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,976 Posts
Good to hear that you also have taken the plunge--you never new that your car wasn't all it could be until you changed these seals out--best thing I have ever done to mine--hope you many happy miles
Golf is perfect here in Southern Virginia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
Just curious. Those tools are pretty hefty.

HOW did you break it?

My original fan clutch "tool" was jury rigged from the flat metal bar stock that was used to lock my tool chest. It was a few mm thick and of relatively soft steel. I had the shop boys at work drill the holes for me and figured it was strong enough. NOT! :mad: The small section between the curved arc cutout and the oval hole snapped as soon as we torqued the 32mm wrench. Sorry, no picture as I left the "tool" at the machine shop.

Plan B was to borrow Chris' (Neversaynever) tool but he wasn't home. Plan C was to modify an old section of garage door holder I had saved after installing a new garage door opener. This piece of flat stock was about 3X thicker and of harder steel. We were very lucky :banana: to find a machinest willing to do the work on a late SAT AM. The machinest drilled the holes and I carved out the arc using a grinder. Now this one is a TOOL. There is NO WAY this tool will break.
 

·
Seek to understand,^Value
Joined
·
25,199 Posts
it was much closer to the 4mm thickness of those "beautiful" tools in your photo (need me some of those), have you used them yet for your cooling system or VANOS?
Mine are 3/16ths inch thick (0.1875" or 4.8mm). It worked just fine for removing the fan clutch nut.

(The harder part was putting the fan clutch nut back straight. I wasn't able to do that until I was pointed to cn90's rope trick.)

I had contemplated trying to make my own tool but what stymied my imagination was how to connect the 26mm long 12mm wide drilled slot. Yours looks really nice.

How did the machinist make the slot? I assume he drilled two 12mm holes but how did he remove the material between them so very nicely?

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
The machinist used a router-like bit, of the same diameter as the drilled holes, and just took away the material. Took him about 10 seconds. Very impressive.

BTW, getting the fan clutch back on was a snap. Not sure why or what we did differently from anyone else except we put some anti-seize on the fan clutch nut (so it can be easily removed for the next cooling system job). I just lined up the fan by holding the blade and began to turn the nut with the wrench. It engaged easily and was dead straight on the first shot. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than good. :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The machinist used a router-like bit, of the same diameter as the drilled holes, and just took away the material. Took him about 10 seconds. Very impressive.

BTW, getting the fan clutch back on was a snap. Not sure why or what we did differently from anyone else except we put some anti-seize on the fan clutch nut (so it can be easily removed for the next cooling system job). I just lined up the fan by holding the blade and began to turn the nut with the wrench. It engaged easily and was dead straight on the first shot. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than good. :thumbup:
You are right Fudman, getting the fan back on was a non-issue, I was surprised when you said it is screwing back on... I figured that would be PITA! Bluebee, the two holes the machinist drilled was "connected" with what they call an "end mill", took him seconds to make a perfectly clean slot in hardened steel 1/4" thick! Fudman and I could have spent four hours with hand tools and not gotten anything like what he made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
285 Mile Report: at start up, tach goes to 1250 for a second or so, drops to 1050 and idles there for a few minutes, misses ZERO, I turn off the fan and the stereo and really listen, no skips, it used to drop a beat here and there; then settles down to 650'ish smooth as silk. Still amazed at the livliness of the I6 with a working VANOS, keep in mind, nothing like the pull of my trucks hemi (with a borla and K&N) but still pulls strong from 1600-3200 without really pushing it at all. I swear it revs "faster" building rpms quicker but not sure why that would be other then the engine is feeding off its own efficiency improvement. No mileage change to report yet, I'll start tracking after I refill the first time in the next day or two. I would highly recommend this to all VANOS I6 owners with over 59,000 miles on the clock (what I had), I have a few spare parts from the Besian suggested part list for anybody interested in taking them off my hands for a CCA discounted cost (I'll pay shipping). I have to figure out how to reduce the resolution of the pics Fudman took of my "open" engine, pretty cool and the RedLine oil puts just the right tint to the inside of your engine (zero wear showing).
 

·
Seek to understand,^Value
Joined
·
25,199 Posts
the two holes the machinist drilled was "connected" with what they call an "end mill" ... Fudman and I could have spent four hours with hand tools and not gotten anything like what he made.
It does look beautiful. I had a friend who said he'd make it for me but he said that he'd have to drill the two 12mm holes and then jig saw between them. He too said it would be a pain.

I'm glad I bought the tools because, when I used them, at first it didn't work and I was frustrated but then I walked around the yard watering the plants. When I came back, it worked the first time to loosen the nut.

Putting the nut back on was another story altogether. Next time, I'm flying Fudman out to the Silicon Valley so he can help me too! :)
 

·
Seek to understand,^Value
Joined
·
25,199 Posts
I have to figure out how to reduce the resolution of the pics Fudman took of my "open" engine
If you need freeware software to do anything ... ask me as that's a hobby of mine.

In the case of picture editing software, I have it all figured out. < / immodesty >.

It's not the "resolution" per se, you want reduced, e.g., 72dpi, but most likely the final size and the dimensions.

For example, I generally reduce my forum-posted pictures to 640x480 pixels dimensions and then I apply algorithms to keep the file size to about 100KB using lossy compression.

The resolution doesn't matter all that much since you're not printing the pictures to paper and you're not in control of anyone's screen resolution.

The SIMPLEST and EASIEST way to do this shrinking, assuming you're on Windows, is to use Irfanview freeware. It's fast. It will do it in batch mode. It will batch rotate. It will auto-rotate the pics losslessly. It will rename the pics based on EXIF data. It will strip out EXIF data if you like, etc.,

Get Irfanview for Windows here.

However, Irfanview stinks for annotation of pictures. Paint.NET freeware works muuuuuuch better for that. It's not as lightning fast as Irfanview, nor does it have the batch conversion features, but, it certainly has the power to annotate nicely.

Get Paint.NET for Windows here.

PS: Maybe we should start a thread on how to modify pictures for posting on the forums.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
The only thing we did differently from my previous three Vanos jobs was to add a dab of anti-seize to the fan nut. It just spun right on. :dunno: Sometimes, it's just better to be lucky than good. :roundel: Here's the pics, Seth!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
good job.

I have 404,XXX KM on my car now & have never changed the vanos or seals.

Now, do I need to change the VANOS units fully or only the sealings? & from where can I order the Besian VANOS seal & what would be the cost?
 
1 - 20 of 65 Posts
Top