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Discussion Starter #1
My wife's Lexus was totaled by a distracted driver and we want to get her in something larger. My mom has a 2001 X5 that she bought new that remains her daily driver today (granted it only has 90,000 miles) and I've always really liked BMW as a brand in terms of build quality and safety. That said, my older 530 had some very expensive maintenance issue and while I know German luxury vehicles will be more expensive to maintain than a Mazda or Hyundai, I want to know which X5 would be more reliable long-term between the 40e and the 35i?

I would say that 90% of my wife's driving is in-town, so the idea of electric driving is phenomenal even if it's limited to 15 miles per charge. That said, it seems like the 35i is a much more tried & true drivetrain and my concern with the 40e is that it's going to be a bigger headache in terms of maintenance in the future. It also seems like they stopped making the 40e relatively quickly?

Anyone have any advice as to how reliable the 2016 40e would be if treated properly and serviced on time?
 

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Nobody knows about long-term reliability of the 40e. Indeed, they're still selling new ones. If we're honest, nobody knows about long-term reliability of the 35i either. Also still selling new ones. The 35i is a simpler design. But not by much - it's a slightly simpler German space shuttle.

And BMW stopped making the F15 40e because they're making G05 45e:

https://g05.bimmerpost.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1532990

The F15 line retooled at the end of last summer.

Keep in mind, the value of every second-owner 40e gets skewed (as does any outstanding loan's payoff value) because the Federal government has been putting $5k on the hood, and many states are still putting extra cash on the hood as well. That up-front money went into somebody's pocket at first sale, though perhaps not into that of the subsequent owners. It skews "depreciation," though not if you think it through.

Also, the 40e (and presumably the new 45e) really wants to be plugged in. Even at 120v, it's just a better SUV if you plug it in overnight. So be honest with yourself about your electric rates. If you're paying $.33/kWh each night, then a PHEV might not be for you.
 

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Glfbggy
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If you're looking for fuel efficiency, find a 35d. Actually, though I'm a little biased, just find a 35d.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
@GHPUP given that so much of our driving is in town, I figured the diesel wouldn't be as solid as the 35i.

@GUYINACAR this is helpful, thank you!
 

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+1 on 35d, however if your choice is between those two I would go with 35i. BMW previous hybrid generations combo did prove to be problematic at higher mileage and expansive to fix (read battery). 35i N55 engine platform has far better performance numbers, had been around for quite some time across BMW line up with low problems level compare to other power plants.
 

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I don't have a diesel. But, everything I've read on the Interwebs says that the emission equipment on diesels don't like short trips at low speeds. The diesel particulate filter (DPF) can't get hot enough to burn itself clean, and eventually clogs up.

The German "bit three" (VW Group, BMW, and Daimler-Benz) have stopped selling diesel passenger cars and SUV's in the US. M-B's only diesel in the U.S. is the big Sprinter van. Their logic for not offering a diesel in the mid-size Metris van is that they're mostly used for city use by their commercial customers, and presumably M-B doesn't want to deal with the accompanying warranty claims on the diesel emission hardware of a diesel in city use.

The catch with hybrids is that those batteries don't last forever. I know two people with old, non-plug in hybrids: a 2005 Honda Accord Hybrid, and a 2006 Prius. Both of them had to replace the batteries after about eight years, at a cost of about $4k. That wiped out all the fuel savings since they bought the cars new. Both of them plan to keep the cars until the second set of batteries are fried.

If you do the math, and account for the maintenance hassles, neither a 35d or a 40e makes a whole lot of sense (to own).

The last time we bought a BMW, they were having crazy lease deals on F15 X5 40e's. But, those batteries eliminate the place were the spare tire goes, and therefore eliminates the spare tire. Lack of a spare is my definition of a car that is not suitable for road trips. I wasn't going to lease a $70k BMW that couldn't go on road trips. So, we waited for the G01 X3 30i... mit spare tire and even non-RFT's!
 

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Happily Driving
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35i.
 

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I don't have a diesel. But, everything I've read on the Interwebs says that the emission equipment on diesels don't like short trips at low speeds. The diesel particulate filter (DPF) can't get hot enough to burn itself clean, and eventually clogs up.

The German "bit three" (VW Group, BMW, and Daimler-Benz) have stopped selling diesel passenger cars and SUV's in the US. M-B's only diesel in the U.S. is the big Sprinter van. Their logic for not offering a diesel in the mid-size Metris van is that they're mostly used for city use by their commercial customers, and presumably M-B doesn't want to deal with the accompanying warranty claims on the diesel emission hardware of a diesel in city use.

The catch with hybrids is that those batteries don't last forever. I know two people with old, non-plug in hybrids: a 2005 Honda Accord Hybrid, and a 2006 Prius. Both of them had to replace the batteries after about eight years, at a cost of about $4k. That wiped out all the fuel savings since they bought the cars new. Both of them plan to keep the cars until the second set of batteries are fried.

If you do the math, and account for the maintenance hassles, neither a 35d or a 40e makes a whole lot of sense (to own).

The last time we bought a BMW, they were having crazy lease deals on F15 X5 40e's. But, those batteries eliminate the place were the spare tire goes, and therefore eliminates the spare tire. Lack of a spare is my definition of a car that is not suitable for road trips. I wasn't going to lease a $70k BMW that couldn't go on road trips. So, we waited for the G01 X3 30i... mit spare tire and even non-RFT's!
Diesel do make sense with SUV size vehicle, but it all depends how you use it, what you expect from performance side etc. There is not one size fits all. German trio did diesel stop sale due to diesel gate with VW, cost in the US associated with it and relatively cheap gad here. All of them still offer diesel on all other markets.
If car is used for short trips diesel will not be beneficial due to most MPG gains being on freeway distance driving.
In regards to emissions same rules applies, it can also be deleted with other benefits (not for everyone).

As said above, 35i is most logical choice here.
 
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