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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Bimmerfest,

First time poster:

2003 BMW 325i
E46
M54

I've got a Fault Code 3c1d. The FC Reader Manual states, "Crank shaft sensor; signal".

Another forum is saying it is an issue with the "Crankshaft position signal" and suggests that I purchase and replace the "Crankshaft Position Sensor". ( http://blog.bavauto.com/6330/bmw-fault-codes-e46-m54-crankshaft-position-sensor-mixture-preparation/ )

For a THIRD source, my repair manual (orange hardback cover) gives directions on pages 120-8 for a Crankshaft Speed Sensor and several Camshaft Position Sensors, but does not give me directions for replacing a Crankshaft Position Sensor.

My question: Which directions do I follow? What do I replace? Are Crankshaft and Camshaft synonymous in the context of a 'Position Sensor'? And where can I find a good step-by-step DIY for this sensor replacement (whichever sensor I am to replace...)?

Many thanks for your help.

Best,
Jonathan_a__a2_
 

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Keeping it surreal
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43,184 Posts
We normally use OBD II codes, which typically read "P0123" or something similar. If you have access to an OBD scanner, post that code.

Example:

Related to: Fuel and Air Metering
• P0001 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit/Open
• P0002 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit Range/Performance
• P0003 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit Low
• P0004 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit High
• P0005 Fuel Shutoff Valve Control Circuit/Open
• P0006 Fuel Shutoff Valve Control Circuit Low
• P0007 Fuel Shutoff Valve Control Circuit H igh
• P0008 Engine Position System Performance (Bank1)
• P0009 Engine Position System Performance (Bank2)
• P0010 A Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit (Bank1)
• P0011 A Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1)
• P0012 A Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 1)
• P0013 B Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit (Bank1)
• P0014 B Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1)
• P0015 B Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 1)
• P0016 Crankshaft Position Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor A)
• P0017 Crankshaft Position Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor B)
• P0018 Crankshaft Position Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 2 Sensor A)
• P0019 Crankshaft Position Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 2 Sensor B)
• P0020 A Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit (Bank 2)
• P0021 A Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2)
• P0022 A Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2)
• P0023 B Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit (Bank 2)
• P0024 B Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2)
• P0025 B Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2)
• P0026 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance (Bank 1)
• P0027 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance (Bank 1)
• P0028 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance (Bank 2)
• P0029 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance (Bank 2)
• P0030 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 1)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply

Thank you for the reply, Fast Bob.

I attached a picture (OBDII.png) of the diagnostic kit that I bought from Bavarian Autosport. It says that it's an OBD II diagnostic tool (I'm guessing that's the input/output?).

My question: Do you know of any cheap ways to get access to the PCode? Do you know of a good, reasonably-priced diagnostic tool? Could I take it to any German auto repair place to get the codes? I'm having a tough time finding one that guarantees giving a PCode...

Send me a link if you have a tool in mind. Thank you for your help!

Best,
E46 Novice
 

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That reader is actually a Peake reader. I have one, and though many folks (jfoj!) think it's useless, it actually provides more info than a typical code reader. Why? Code readers can "read" all the govt mandated "P" codes. This reader can read all of the "codes" that a BMW engine computer (ECU; made by Siemens) produces. That said, the format of the readout is the table # and then a 2 character alpha numeric code. The code book is about 25 pages long!!!

Btw, I also have OBDFusion on my iPhone. That's good for logging data to pinpoint a cause of a problem.
 

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They are known as cranks position sensor (CKS) and cam position sensor (CPS), the different terminology you are coming across is because anything more technical than a door handle confuses people when they try writing about it.

So according to my Peake manual code 3C1D is "crankshaft sensor: signal"...you need to replace your crankshaft sensor. For example part #3 here (make sure that's your car selected).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi all,

Thank you all for your help and replies. Wanted to update this thread on the first issue and bring up another.

First, the replacement of "CKS", Crankshaft Position Sensor, Crankshaft Pulse Generator, or whatever else you want to call it, was fairly simple. Here are the steps, adapted from Bentley's Publisher.

Helpful Link.

(1) Purchase the Equipment - I bought a new CKS and an O-Ring.
(1) Lift the Front of the Car - I used some Rhino Ramps that I got at Walmart because Advanced Autozone didn't have any. Also, make sure your car is stable in its lift.
(2) Let the engine cool - The CKS is difficult to get to and work with in a hot engine.
(3) Remove the Splash Guard - I think there were 6 to 8 bolts that kept the splash guard attached underneath the engine. These bolts require a 16mm socket to remove.
(4) Find the CKS - It is positioned just under the Starter, which looks like two black cylinders. It has three wires feeding into it. It is difficult to see directly. You may have to feel your way to it and go past some other wires.
(5) Unscrew the CKS - My screw required a 5mm Allen. The Helpful Link above said it would be a Fillister Flathead. I felt the screw, realized it required an Allen, tried out a few until 5mm matched.
(6) Cut Wire Ties - Bentley's said that there would be Wire Ties. I think they look like Zip Ties. At any rate, there were none on my CKS.
(7) Replace - CKS should then pop out. Detach the wires from the CKS. Reattach them to the new CKS and O-Ring. Other forums told me to rub the new O-Ring with engine oil. Screw the new CKS into the hole from which you took the original CKS. Reverse the steps to completion.

So, that's how I replaced the CKS. I now have a new problem. I may have driven for too long with a bad CKS because my car now shakes and vibrates when I drive. The shaking takes place no matter how fast I am going and even takes place when my car is in neutral. It is a little cyclical; for instance, it will be bad for a second, better the next, bad for the next, and so on. Did I misalign my Crankshaft? I'm also seeing some things about the Control Arm Bushings or misfiring. I've been driving for about 150 to 200 miles without any codes reappearing. Thank you all for any help here! I would appreciate any direction. Thank you =)

Best,
E46 Novice
 

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From what vendor did you buy the crank position sensor? What brand is the new sensor? BMW used crankshaft position sensors by Siemens/VDO.

There's no way to misalign the crankshaft! Sounds like you have a driveshaft issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thank you for the reply, Marco. Hmm... It appears that I got a Meyle. Should I try again with with a Siemens/VDO? Vendor: Bavarian Autosport

Best,
E46 Novice
 

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Meyle parts are generally ok. I have Meyle HD lower control arms and bushing in my car. However, Meyle parts can be made anywhere in the world.

The sensor is easy to replace IF you have a lift. How long do you expect to keep the car? If it's greater than 3 years I'd return the part and buy a Siemens/VDO sensor.
 
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