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Discussion Starter #1
With both of these issues, it appears that the crappy roads we drive on contribute to these issues. Obviously this is the issue in the Z8, but maybe this is the issue for our Z3 based cars too. But in the Z3's it just takes longer to develop? Of course the lack of design doesn't help either.

This brings up the question I have:

Shouldn't our insurance cover fixing these problems?

Has anyone tried an insurance claim?

All you have to do is tell them you hit a massive pot hole or debris in the road and file a claim and pay your deductable.

Then, maybe after enough z3 claims were filed, the insurance companies and their lawyers would help fight this issue.

Has anyone tried turning in a claim? At least if the insurance company rejected the claim, they would most likely do so on the basis of poor design. Then you have real ammo to sue BMW.

What do you all think?
 

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I think the only thing that would really happen is an increased costs for anybody wanting to insure a Z3, and probably not renewing current Z3 owners. I doubt the insurance company would go after a manuf. esp. if the manuf. hasn't indicated that there is a problem.

Kimo
 

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Discussion Starter #3
kbonnel said:
I think the only thing that would really happen is an increased costs for anybody wanting to insure a Z3, and probably not renewing current Z3 owners. I doubt the insurance company would go after a manuf. esp. if the manuf. hasn't indicated that there is a problem.

Kimo
The increased costs on the Z3 cars would be marginal at best since most owners don't even know they have a problem unless it is pointed out or their diff is hanging from the ground. Most wouldn't know they could turn it in as an insurance claim eihter. So increased costs would be minimal.

Since the manufacturer hasn't admitted that their is a problem with the cars, it appears logical that it must be the crappy roads we drive on that is (over time) causing the problem. Therefore, insurance (if you have full coverage) should cover the fix so long as you present the claim as "I hit a pot hole, this happened, and the cost of damage is more than my deductable". Since it is a non-vehicular accident, your rates won't even go up.
 

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No go on the insurance claim...The Z8s may have more of an argument since it (based on my very limited reading of posts) is more of a sudden thing (hitting a pothole) rather than the subframe issue being one that develops over time.

Insurance policies usually have language to the effect of "sudden and accidental" and exclude coverage for wear and tear.
 

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Honestly, this is how I always thought insurance for your car should work. It should be comprehensive in the fact that if the car sustained major damage whether through age/defect, etc, it would be covered. Now isn't that why you would insure something? Otherwise insurance is only good to hedge off stupidity of oneself or others.
 

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kevjandon said:
Since it is a non-vehicular accident, your rates won't even go up.
This is a myth. Perhaps it was once true, but no longer. Insurance companies share a common database of 'incidents' which include any tickets, reported wrecks, and any claims (including non-moving). They look for patterns of too many incidents and then raise your rates based on that. Here's the fun part. The incident doesn't even have to be your fault. If you had several instances of being in an accident that was the other driver's fault, your rates could still go up based on the number of 'incidents' in which you were involved.

I had all of this carefully explained to me when my insurance company raised my rates based on damage that someone else did to my truck. Wasn't my fault that someone tagged my tailgate and the damage was only about $1000, but it didn't matter. That was the 'incident' that triggered a dramatic increase in my rates because I was suddenly considered a higher risk (I haven't had a speeding ticket in over ten years). I had been in an accident a couple of years ago that was the other driver's fault. Guess what: that was on my record as an 'incident' even though the police cited the other driver. They told me that even windshield repairs are logged as incidents. So when the windshield vendor tries to tell you he can replace your windshield for free and it won't affect your insurance rates, don't believe it.

And by the way, it works the same way for your homeowners insurance. Doesn't matter what the cause of the claim.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
TR6 said:
...incidents...

Sounds like you have crappy insurance?

My insurance company doen't record items that way. I should know, I've had 3 accidents in 5 years (none my fault, I just a good target). None have effected my policy premiums at all.
 

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TR6 said:
If you had several instances of being in an accident that was the other driver's fault, your rates could still go up based on the number of 'incidents' in which you were involved.

Yep, Prudential Insurance dropped me because I got rear ended twice within two years. Oh and I also made a claim when a hub cap came flying off a car in front of me on the highway and landed on my hood leaving a deep gash. When I went over to American Family, on my insurance report it showed that I was at fault with the hubcap thing, so I had to struggle with Prudential in getting that record changed. They said I could have avoided the hubcap. I couldn't because I was in heavy traffic and believe you are not to swerve to avoid a bigger accident. I eventually got that worked out.

Basically, what I am getting at is I believe the insurance route would lead to a dead end.
 

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kevjandon said:
Sounds like you have crappy insurance?

My insurance company doen't record items that way. I should know, I've had 3 accidents in 5 years (none my fault, I just a good target). None have effected my policy premiums at all.
Not crappy at all. Its USAA. They all access the same database. Its a subscription service that insurance companies use. I had about three incidents (none were my fault) in about 5 years also. Then I claimed my tailgate damage on my truck and that tipped the scale. I was told that the formula uses a variety of factors including number of incidents, cost of incidents, frequency, and obvious things like speeding tickets and other traffic citations, and age of drivers in the household. A buddy that works in the industry told me that there is even a factor that goes into the database if you've ever had an insurance company cancel you for any reason.

When I started shopping other insurance companies to replace USAA because they had raised my rates, I found out they all had the same incidents listed at their fingertips and it affected my rating with the other insurance companies also. You may be lucky and just have not had the one claim that triggered an increase yet.
 

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TR6 said:
I was told that the formula uses a variety of factors including number of incidents, cost of incidents, frequency, and obvious things like speeding tickets and other traffic citations, and age of drivers in the household.

Yep, that is why I was so particular about getting rid of the mark against me for the hubcap. I was clean with the law, but I guess Prudential got tired of paying for my rear bumper and front hood.
 
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