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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

good day everyone, newbie here. Can someone show me or tell me the steps or tools needed to replace e39 wagon rotor & brake pads. I thought they were the same as sedans but I I think it's different. I was in the process of doing it. When I was trying to remove the 2nd caliper (the one in the lower)carrier guide bolts I realized my ratchet won't fit. There's less space. Even if I tried to use a 1/4 drive with extension still won't fit. Any info/insights will be helpful thanks
 

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if you search you tube, there is a video showing how to do it. It's fairly straight forward and easy. You'll need a 3/8 ratchet, torx bit for the caliber bolts, and I think a 15mm socket to remove the caliber guide. use some pb blaster or equivlaent to remove the
6mm rotor retaining bolts. give them a few tips with a mallet and chisel to knock them loose. i also suggest using some anti seize on the caliber bolts and the rotor retaining bolt. oh, and DO NOT ENGAGE THE PARKING BRAKE WHEN DOING THE REAR ROTORS!!!
you wont be able to get them off, and if you smash them off, you will destroy the parking brake drum. Remove the driver's side cabin filter housing and open up the cap on the brake fluid reservoir, if you dont purge some of the fluid, you'll end up pushing
brake fluid out of the reservoir into the wheel well of your car. Good luck.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your right. I've watched numerous vids on e39 brake DIY. It is really straight forward. It was just the rears I had a problem because the suspension set up in the rear is quite different compare to sedans. I was thinking of using Allen wrench instead ratchet with Torx heads, if I do that my concern is the Torx tightness. How will I Torx it according to specs if even a ratchet won't fit. What you think?
 

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Your right. I've watched numerous vids on e39 brake DIY. It is really straight forward. It was just the rears I had a problem because the suspension set up in the rear is quite different compare to sedans. I was thinking of using Allen wrench instead ratchet with Torx heads, if I do that my concern is the Torx tightness. How will I Torx it according to specs if even a ratchet won't fit. What you think?
You are confusing two terms, Torx and torque.

Torx is a type of screw or bolt head which requires specific bits or drivers to properly tighten. The Torx head looks ike a six-pointed star.
Here's a Torx-head screw:

You may find an Allen wrench which happens to fit a particular Torx-head screw or bolt, but because it is not an exact fit, you can easily damage the Torx-head and then not be able to loosen or tighten the bolt. If you have Torx-headed bolts on your suspension, you really should use the proper tools.

Torque is a measurement of the amount of force needed or specified to tighten a screw or bolt. For automobiles, it is measured in foot-pounds or newton-meters and is typically applied with a torque-wrench. You may use a torque-wrench to tighten a Torx-head bolt.

Regards,
 

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One thing to note is that the touring rear hand brake adjuster is in a different location compared to the sedan. The sedan adjuster is parallel to the ground and on the lower side of the disc. On the touring the adjuster is vertical and adjacent to the caliper. The rear wheel carrier is different to the sedan as it has the perch for the rear spring, coil or air type, and the hand brake cable enters the brake drum at the front rather than on the top. All the documentation I have seen including the BMW TIS fails to note the difference.

How did I find out?

I spent some time trying to find the adjuster at the bottom of the disc when I was trying to remove the rear discs. You will probably have to back off the adjuster before you can remove the rear discs. It was only when I looked inside the disc via the wheel stud hole and couldn't see the adjuster that I found that it wasn't in the same position as the sedan.

Edit: Another thing to note is that the same adjuster is used on both sides of the car, not LH thread on one side and RH thread on the other side as is the more usual setup.
What this means is you have to move the adjuster in opposite directions on each side of the car to achieve the same effect. ie: expanding or retracting the brake shoes for adjustment purposes.

RonR
99 528iT M52TU
 

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Sorry to thread revive, but...

mgs did you ever find a good way to remove those caliper bolts?
Touring hardware in the rears is quite a bit different than sedans
I replaced my front brakes but I couldnt even start the rears..

I was thinking I might have to fab a custom 7mm hex tool.
 
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