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Hi, all. Time to give back, here, as these forums have always been so helpful.

The repair: water pump and thermostat replacement on an AWD E60/N52 5-series (2007 530xi). I think this procedure is similar for E60 and E90 models with either N52 or N54 engines. Regardless, the procedure is quite different from the same job on a RWD vehicle, which is what most posts/videos I've found cover (BavAuto, AutoDoc, Pelican, etc.).

Brief background:

This is a frustrating job, and I would not recommend attempting it unless you are firmly confident in your mechanical abilities. For reference, Pelican Parts rates this as a maximum (5/5) difficulty job, for RWD models, and it is substantially more frustrating on AWD vehicles. It is doable though, and is really not that bad once gone through and understood. It took me approx. 2.5 hrs the second time doing it, when I knew what I was doing (I'd received a bad part which was installed during the first run-through).

Instructions here assume intermediate mechanical knowledge. Pictures of key steps I could not find elsewhere are provided (not given in the Bentley manual, for example). Obviously, perform all operations safely, at your own risk, and consistent with environmental regulations (disposal of antifreeze/coolant). One final note: silicone (rubber-safe) lubricant is your friend when removing coolant line connections.

Alright, on to it. Overview instructions are numbered below, with details/commentary given by letters per instruction step as appropriate.

Procedure:
  1. Raise and properly support vehicle.
    1. I recommend raising at all 4 corners for room in the back, and to help drain the cooling system.
    2. Jack/jack stands are perfectly fine (I used a Quick Jack system).
  1. Working under the vehicle, remove front splash shield, skid plate, and undercar shield (two plastic shields and one metal plate).
    1. Radiator, subframe, and transmission/exhaust should all be exposed once all these shields are removed.
    2. I was performing other work at the time, and so do not recall if removal of all undercar shields is necessary for this job, but doing so (i) is easy, and (ii) will ensure your view matches the pictures here.
  1. Drain cooling system.
    1. This may be done from stopcock located at radiator bottom on passenger's side of vehicle, or by disconnecting a lower coolant line. I drained from the radiator stopcock.
    2. Note that there will be some coolant left in the system, trapped in hoses.
  1. Back at the topside of vehicle, working in the engine bay, remove the coolant expansion tank.
    1. Disconnect the coolant lines connected to the expansion tank by quick connect fittings, then removing the securing fasteners, then finally disconnect the coolant level sensor on the underside of expansion tank.
    2. This would be a good time to study how BMW coolant line quick connect fittings work, if you are unfamiliar with them (handy information later).
Before going back under the vehicle, let's take a quick look at the water pump/thermostat assembly after it has been removed from the vehicle in order to better understand the disconnections we're about to make, when the assembly is still attached to the vehicle. I'll also call out which steps are the challenging ones.

In the image below, the water pump and thermostat housing ("T-stat") are still connected by a U‑shaped coolant line. I removed them from the vehicle still connected this way, and would not even bother trying to undo this connection while still attached to the vehicle (it wouldn't help anything).

The large blue arrows given indicate the assembly's orientation when still mounted on the vehicle. The smaller orange arrows indicate the locations of the 3 bolts that hold the water pump to the engine block. The top bolt is labeled for visual guidance (it is difficult to see under the vehicle). The bottom bolts are easy to see when under the vehicle.

The coolant line connections that need to be undone before the assembly can come out of the vehicle are labeled with numbers (1 - 4). Connections 1 and 2 are pretty easy to get to from under the vehicle. The trick to connection 3 is to come at it from the top-side, through the opening in the engine bay on the passenger side, created by removing the coolant expansion tank. Connection 4 to the water pump is the toughest one to remove, but I was able to access it through an opening in the subframe from under the vehicle. Note that connections 1 and 2 are quick-connect type, and 3 and 4 are standard hose-clamp type. Focus is given to these steps below, and I use this numbering system for these connections throughout this instruction set.

1013981


The following Steps 5-7 all reference the image below, where the water pump/thermostat housing assembly is still mounted to the vehicle. Connection points 1 and 2 defined above are labeled again in the image below for visual guidance. Connections 3 and 4 can't be seen in the image below.

1013983


  1. Back under the vehicle, remove the fastener (nut) holding the power steering hose (PSH) bracket in place.
    1. The nut is located on top of the bracket. Pelican Parts' tech article for this job (RWD version) has a good picture of this.
    2. Removing this fastener/bracket gives the PSH freedom to move and grants additional, necessary access in later steps. This has already been done in the image shown.
  2. Disconnect the electrical connections to the water pump and T-stat (yellow dots indicate both the connection points and wires). Also disconnect the hoses from connection points 1 and 2 on the T-stat, held in place by quick connect fittings (blue dots label these hoses). "What goes where" for electrical and hose connections should be obvious by size and geometry for reassembly later.
    1. The hose quick connect fittings here work the same way as those on the coolant expansion tank: they are U-shaped pins that lock connections together once the hose and connection point are fully mated, and the U-pin is pushed down into place. While you will probably not be able to see the top of the U-pin in one or both of the cases here, follow the edge of the U-pin with your finger and use a small screwdriver or pick to pull it up when you get to the top. Be careful not to puncture the coolant hose while picking blind. Once the U-pins are in the fully UP (unlocked) position, back the hoses off of the thermostat housing. Gently wedging a flathead screwdriver in at the mating surface and prying can get things started. However, be sure not to damage the plastic if you intend to reuse the hoses. Also be careful not to accidentally bump the U-pins back into the down/locked position while working.
  1. Remove the two bolts holding the T-stat to the water pump (the 2 hex head fasteners indicated with red arrows, on the left).
    1. This provides some much-needed freedom of motion for the remaining hose disconnections.
    2. Do NOT yet disconnect the other 2 star/E-torx bolts that hold the water pump in place (other 2 red arrows, right). We'll come back for those later.
  1. Go back topside to the engine bay: with the coolant expansion tank removed, we can remove the standard hose clamp and hose from the T-stat at connection 3. Working down through the opening created by removing the coolant expansion tank, disconnect the hose/hose clamp from connection 3. The hose clamp can be removed with either a flathead screwdriver bit on an extension, or by using a 6 mm hex socket. If your vehicle was previously serviced, the hex size may differ. The series of photos below starts from a distance and zooms in on this hose clamp, as it can be hard to pick out. The clamp is circled in red and the corresponding hose to be removed labeled with a green oval. If the hose clamp is indexed (pointed) such that it is truly unreachable from any angle, my recommendation would be to cut the hose at the connection point and just replace it. Seriously. Then, upon reinstall, set yourself up for success and index it as shown in the picture.
1013984

1013985

1013986


  1. Finally, we're ready to remove the last hose clamp located at the water pump, connection 4. Similar to connection 3, done above, we're hoping this hose clamp is indexed as shown in the picture for ease of access. If it is not, I honestly don't know if it would be easier to try a different "angle of attack" to loosen this clamp, or to cut the connection and replace it. For reference, the rubber portion of this coolant feed pipe (which is connected to the water pump) is p/n 11537516414, and the feed pipe itself p/n 11537516414. The feed pipe is bolted to the cylinder head just under the exhaust manifold and would need to be removed if you cut the connection in order to replace the rubber boot. Regardless, let's hope it's indexed as shown so you don't have to do any of that and can come up through the subframe with a flathead bit or 6 mm hex socket.
  1. Loosen the clamp (circled in red, picture below) then the rubber section of the feed pipe from the water pump (this junction is labeled with a green arrow). The U-shaped hose running from the water pump to the thermostat housing is labeled here as a reminder that this does NOT need to be disconnected in order to remove the assembly from the vehicle. Other parts (steering rack, sway bar) are labeled strictly to help orient you to position under the vehicle.
1013987


  1. Once the final hose has been disconnected (connection 4), remove the bolts holding the water pump to the block (see final 2 red arrows from earlier, and "Top bolt" label from first picture). Be careful to properly identify the top bolt position (it will not be visible) prior to removal. There is a bolt to the a/c compressor (I think it was) that is visible and deceptive… with your hand, follow the water pump up to find the bolt to be sure.
  1. Once the water pump bolts and connection 4 are removed, the complete assembly can be pulled from the vehicle for whatever service is necessary (thermostat replacement and/or water pump replacement, U-shaped hose replacement, etc.). To remove, pull the assembly forward and down/out. It will require a bit of wiggling/jostling and rotating, but should come out freely.
  1. Installation is the reverse of removal, of course. I cleaned up the connection points of the reused hoses with a clean cloth and applied a SMALL amount of SuperLube to the interior lip of the hoses to facilitate reinstall. It went smoothly.
  1. Button all connections back up, fill system with fresh coolant, and bleed according to the automatic procedure (documented in many places elsewhere), and done! Congrats. You just saved a ton of money.

Epilogue:

I had to do this job twice because I received a T-stat housing with a chewed up gasket (didn't know until I traced a coolant leak to this brand-new Uro part after doing the job).

Ask me how thrilled I was at this discovery.

Anyway - to potentially save you the same frustration, checking the gasket is easy enough. Below are two images of the T-stat housing: first, of the intact assembly, where you can see the 3 torx bolts holding the clamshell assembly together around the thermostat itself (you can see the tail of the thermostat down through the hole where connection 3 is). Remove the 3 torx bolts to take the assembly apart if you'd like to check the inner gasket. Doing so affords the second picture: the clamshell has been disassembled, revealing the thermostat itself and the chewed-up gasket, as received. I fixed by cleaning up the frayed parts and further sealing the edges with Permatex gasket maker because I needed the vehicle the next day… though preference would have been to find the right gasket and replace outright. It's been months with no leak though, so all's well.

Hope this helps, and happy wrenching!

1013988

1013989
 

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2006 530xi 6 MT
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Good write up. I'd like to add a few of my own experiences. I've done my 2006 530xi once and my wife's 2009 X5 N52 twice.

I didn't see the need to remove the coolant reservoir. I only removed the front undershield. I put the car on front jack stands only. Removing the fan shroud is very helpful and fairly easy once you know how to unlock it on each side. Remove the serpentine belt until you are done so it doesn't get fouled with coolant. Getting the coolant quick connect fitting apart is hard since you can't rotate the hose to break it free. Getting the hose clamps properly positioned to tighten may have taken me the longest time in each case. The torque spec for the hose clamps makes it seems like you are tightening them more than would seem correct. Don't forget to get new aluminum screws for the water pump. On the X5, I did most of the work through the fender liner and on the 530xi, I went from under for the most part.

Given the ages of these cars now, if the front of your engine is junked up with oily sludge, I'd take this opportunity to degrease it before you start the water pump job. It may also be you need to change the oil cooler and oil filter housing gaskets. If you do this make sure you flush with plenty of water to get all the solvent off and take the serpentine belt off before you start.

Another good add-on job is swapping out the mickey-mouse ears hose that runs from the thermostat to the engine. Get a replacement hose (e.g. Rein) that has an aluminum fitting on the engine side or get the aluminum fitting (Amazon) and fit it to the existing hose. That hose fitting will crumble at some point.
 

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2008 BMW 535xi
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I also have done water pump replacement. 3 times on my BMW 2008 535Xi. I could never have it done in 3 or 4 hours . Took me two days with each day I worked for about 3-4 hrs. I also did not remove expansion tank. All works performed under the car in a tight cramp space. First day is to remove old one and install new part. Second day to check over the work when I am not too exhausted and frustrated then purge the system and rebutting up the car .
I would buy OEM part only as this job is hard to do and I had bad part that only last 1 year thus I had to redo it for the third time .
 

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I'm getting ready to do this job as well (2006 530xi Touring / N52) and am going to be doing the belts and hoses while I'm in the area. I'll be pulling the fans to make the belts and hoses easier - does anyone think that I should also pull the coolant tank as well, or will having the fans and belts out of the way give me access to the "fiddly bits"?

But mainly - THANKS for this thread, and the sage advice. I am not looking forward to this job, but suspect it'll be easier than swapping out the front differential (a joy I got to experience a couple months ago). ;-) You really DO pay the price for the AWD thing on a BMW!
 

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I have the same car 2006 530xi...never pulled the coolant tank and I've done the water pump / thermostat / U-hose once and also changed the mickey-mouse ears hose another time along with a new coolant tank since the level stoick had broken off.
 

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2008 BMW 535xi
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I think pulling the expansion tank is a good idea. Although I have done this job 3 times and did remove the tank and struggling to reinstall the thermostat hoses from under the car. I would remove it if I have to do the job again to see if it would help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the feedback and added information to the thread, fellas. The more information the better on this job, I think. From what I gathered reading a bunch of posts on the topic prior to doing the job myself, it seems like there are a few ways of approaching this. Though I didn't find it necessary, I do recall hearing that other folks had removed the fan shroud and fan as twh suggested, and one even dropped the subframe a bit for clearance. Fortunately, I didn't have to go that far... though, there was a moment of desperation before I worked this approach out I thought I was going to have to. For me, the expansion tank trick was a lifesaver, but I don't remember all the ways how I approached that hose clamp first (I do remember trying to go through the passenger side wheel well). Regardless, if taking 15 minutes to get something out of the way saves 2+ hrs of labor trying to work around it, I'm always in favor of clearing obstacles.

To Mannig236's point -- definitely go OEM parts on this. You don't want to be doing this job regularly. I went OEM on the pump (Pierberg I think?), but went aftermarket on the T-stat, thinking "how can you possibly screw up a thermostat/housing?". That was dumb. Shoulda spent the extra $20 or whatever. Weirdly, the housing I pulled off was aluminum, and all new parts I saw (inlcuding OEM) were plastic.

Finally -- I noticed my numbering scheme got screwed up when posting text in from the Word doc I had going, and apparently copied in the same p/n for both the metal coolant feed pipe and rubber connector to the pump (p/n applies to metal feed pipe). Sorry about that. Hopefully it's not too confusing, and let us know how your run-through goes, habbyguy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh, yeah -- and as twh mentioned above: get and use new aluminum bolts for the water pump. As I'm sure everyone is aware, BMW aluminum bolts are nominally one-time use (being TTY - torque to yield)...

... and the ones securing the N52 valve cover are particularly delicate. Ask me how I know.
 

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I would suggest that you check these two hoses and replace them while you have the coolant system empty. I had to do this emergency side road repair a year after water pump replacement which was not fun. The plastic coupling deteriorated with heat overtime. OEM parts is about $300 for two hoses. The smaller hose I think you can order from eBay for aluminum coupling.
Hoses:
Top radiator hose connecting to oil filter assembly
Small hose connect to thermostat and cylinder head just below oil filter assembly

Auto part Engine Pipe Automotive engine part Valve
Auto part Fuel line Automotive fuel system Engine Wire
Auto part Pipe
Auto part Fuel line Tire Automotive tire Suspension
 

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ZackBMW - thanks for doing the write-up... it was a great help to me, and I was able to approach this job understanding what was involved.

The thing I wasn't able to locate was a video on the process though (I've heard it's because those doing the job lost their minds before they got the video done). Maybe... So I did a (crude, quickie) video that (I think) will help those doing water pumps on the xi variants (seems that everyone is happy to do a video on the 2WD versions, which seems to be a LOT easier).

BMW E60 / E61 xi AWD water pump replacement

I ended up taking out fewer bits than some - I left the coolant tank, the frame stiffener, and pretty much everything else in place. I took out the radiator fan and moved the one power steering hose, but other than that, it wasn't that difficult to work around.

I think I accidentally deleted the scene where I disconnected the small "mickey mouse hose" at the thermostat. It wasn't that difficult either - just got lucky that it was indexed so I could reach it. In retrospect, I'd recommend just getting a new hose (they fail pretty often anyway, due to the use of plastic for the top connection), and just pull the hose out with the pump / thermostat assembly, and reinstall the new hose with the pump and thermostat out of the car. It's a LOT easier to just thread the hose around the side of the engine than it is to reach that hose clamp through the itty bitty little space between the pump and thermostat.

I spent a couple minutes in the middle of the video cleaning out a shocking amount of debris (leaves, mainly) from between the radiator and A/C condenser. I had NO idea that all that stuff was there, but it was literally blocking half of the radiator, and probably 2/3rds of the condenser. Even so, the car ran cool through the Arizona summer (though the A/C was always a little weak - now I know why). I jacked up the radiator as much as I could without going to a lot of work, and jammed a deep socket under the radiator to allow access to the debris. Then I pushed it down with a small bit of lumber (so it wouldn't damage the delicate surroundings), and cleaned it out with a vacuum (not shown) and compressed air. What a mess... but now the car should run cooler than ever.

Hope this video helps those considering this job. It's not for the faint-hearted, but it's really not all THAT bad, either. Make sure and have all the oddball tools you'll need - the "inside-out Torx sockets", lots of extensions, some of the "wobbles", and of course, lots of light.
 

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Mannig236, it's funny, but my "mickey mouse hose" looked exactly like yours when I removed it - the "nose" that goes into the engine block stayed in there, just like yours. AFAIK, it wasn't (yet) leaking, but it couldn't have been far from it. I've heard that there are aftermarket aluminum "mouse ears" that will allow replacing that weak link in the design. I'd hate (!) to have to replace the whole hose, since it would involve an unfortunate re-visit to that cramped water pump / thermostat / everything else area. ;-)
 

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Great information, as most of what is out there does not pertain to the xi models. Did this job years ago, and remember it to be difficult. Replaced the original one at 60k miles. At 111k miles now. Not looking forward to doing this job again. When I do, I plan on replacing all the coolant hoses, as preventative maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ZackBMW - thanks for doing the write-up... it was a great help to me, and I was able to approach this job understanding what was involved.

The thing I wasn't able to locate was a video on the process though (I've heard it's because those doing the job lost their minds before they got the video done). Maybe... So I did a (crude, quickie) video that (I think) will help those doing water pumps on the xi variants (seems that everyone is happy to do a video on the 2WD versions, which seems to be a LOT easier).

BMW E60 / E61 xi AWD water pump replacement

I ended up taking out fewer bits than some - I left the coolant tank, the frame stiffener, and pretty much everything else in place. I took out the radiator fan and moved the one power steering hose, but other than that, it wasn't that difficult to work around.

I think I accidentally deleted the scene where I disconnected the small "mickey mouse hose" at the thermostat. It wasn't that difficult either - just got lucky that it was indexed so I could reach it. In retrospect, I'd recommend just getting a new hose (they fail pretty often anyway, due to the use of plastic for the top connection), and just pull the hose out with the pump / thermostat assembly, and reinstall the new hose with the pump and thermostat out of the car. It's a LOT easier to just thread the hose around the side of the engine than it is to reach that hose clamp through the itty bitty little space between the pump and thermostat.

I spent a couple minutes in the middle of the video cleaning out a shocking amount of debris (leaves, mainly) from between the radiator and A/C condenser. I had NO idea that all that stuff was there, but it was literally blocking half of the radiator, and probably 2/3rds of the condenser. Even so, the car ran cool through the Arizona summer (though the A/C was always a little weak - now I know why). I jacked up the radiator as much as I could without going to a lot of work, and jammed a deep socket under the radiator to allow access to the debris. Then I pushed it down with a small bit of lumber (so it wouldn't damage the delicate surroundings), and cleaned it out with a vacuum (not shown) and compressed air. What a mess... but now the car should run cooler than ever.

Hope this video helps those considering this job. It's not for the faint-hearted, but it's really not all THAT bad, either. Make sure and have all the oddball tools you'll need - the "inside-out Torx sockets", lots of extensions, some of the "wobbles", and of course, lots of light.
Glad it was of use, and congrats on a successful job! Also, thanks for uploading your video. While I can only speak for myself, I think you are correct... I only had the "mental wherewithal" to even take pictures because of having to do it a second time through, back-to-back. Your posted experience is particularly interesting, because I think (if I understood what you encountered correctly), it gives an answer as to what to do if the hose to the pump is indexed opposite of how mine was (come at it from the front), and disconnecting the challenging coolant line to the T-stat from the mickey-mouse ears junction was a clever approach! Admittedly, I was hesitant to take that approach - as I had done some work on my wife's X5 where I had one of those snap off, leaving plastic in the cylinder head - and I did not have a replacement hose handy, making me extra cautious. However, my being under-prepared was no excuse to avoid doing something, hah. I think having all of these different approaches catalogued to deal with all of the different ways things might be configured is great! And to your last point -- agreed: I automatically assume (perhaps wrongly) that someone tackling this particular job already has all of the extensions (flex and not), wobble joints, E-torx sockets, etc. required. Not a bad idea to just go ahead and mention those are all needed here. Thanks again!
 

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Lahoriya E60 528xi
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Thanks to the instructions here. Super helpful. I've replaced the water pump and t-stat. but keep getting the "Low Coolant" warning light (Stays on). The bobble sensor indicates the coolant level is at Max. Not sure why the warning doesn't go away. Any pointers would be appreciated.
 

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2001 325i 5mt, 2009 535xi Touring 6mt
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I believe the level sensor is inside the coolant reservoir. I believe it is a magnetic reed switch with a circular float that goes up and down around it with a magnet inside. First verify that it's plugged in, you could also try getting a little wire and jumpering the two leads together to see if the alert goes away. Lastly, you could put an ohm meter across the two pins of the sensor and see if the value changes as you add/remove coolant with a siphon hose. If that fails I would replace the sensor, at least that would be my own plan of attack.
 

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2006 530xi 6 MT
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In addition, the level sensor is a replaceable part! That assumes the floating piece that is captive in the tank is still there and free to float (not the float stick, but a piece that floats along side the sensor).

Part #2 in this diagram for my 2006 530xi page in Realoem.com:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
ZackBMW - thanks for doing the write-up... it was a great help to me, and I was able to approach this job understanding what was involved.

The thing I wasn't able to locate was a video on the process though (I've heard it's because those doing the job lost their minds before they got the video done). Maybe... So I did a (crude, quickie) video that (I think) will help those doing water pumps on the xi variants (seems that everyone is happy to do a video on the 2WD versions, which seems to be a LOT easier).

BMW E60 / E61 xi AWD water pump replacement

I ended up taking out fewer bits than some - I left the coolant tank, the frame stiffener, and pretty much everything else in place. I took out the radiator fan and moved the one power steering hose, but other than that, it wasn't that difficult to work around.

I think I accidentally deleted the scene where I disconnected the small "mickey mouse hose" at the thermostat. It wasn't that difficult either - just got lucky that it was indexed so I could reach it. In retrospect, I'd recommend just getting a new hose (they fail pretty often anyway, due to the use of plastic for the top connection), and just pull the hose out with the pump / thermostat assembly, and reinstall the new hose with the pump and thermostat out of the car. It's a LOT easier to just thread the hose around the side of the engine than it is to reach that hose clamp through the itty bitty little space between the pump and thermostat.

I spent a couple minutes in the middle of the video cleaning out a shocking amount of debris (leaves, mainly) from between the radiator and A/C condenser. I had NO idea that all that stuff was there, but it was literally blocking half of the radiator, and probably 2/3rds of the condenser. Even so, the car ran cool through the Arizona summer (though the A/C was always a little weak - now I know why). I jacked up the radiator as much as I could without going to a lot of work, and jammed a deep socket under the radiator to allow access to the debris. Then I pushed it down with a small bit of lumber (so it wouldn't damage the delicate surroundings), and cleaned it out with a vacuum (not shown) and compressed air. What a mess... but now the car should run cooler than ever.

Hope this video helps those considering this job. It's not for the faint-hearted, but it's really not all THAT bad, either. Make sure and have all the oddball tools you'll need - the "inside-out Torx sockets", lots of extensions, some of the "wobbles", and of course, lots of light.
Funnily (or not), as I was headed to get an alignment earlier after replacing inner and outer tie rods (both sides) on my E60, I pressed the brake pedal... and wound up with my foot in the floor. Sure enough, brake fluid leakage by the driver's side rear wheel. I thought the YouTube channel I wound up on a few min later RE: common brake hard line burst point on E60s and line splicing looked familiar! Hah. When the tools and energy come in, I may humbly request any pointers you have that didn't make it into the video you posted on the subject...
 
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