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Discussion Starter #1
On my m62tu i decided to install an oil catch can to bypass the stupid CCV/PCV valve behind the manifold because it went on me for the second time since owning this car. I installed it running from the crankcase vent tube under the manifold into a catch can and back into the front of the intake in front of the throttle body. Now what’s happening is i ran it the other night and i hit the gas, go look under the hood and my whole brand new valve cover seal on the drivers side blew a ton of oil out the gasket... covered my engine in ****. gotta love it. Wondering why a catch with this system would cause so much pressure buildup? The car ran pretty good so i just don’t understand what the deal is, should i be running the catch in a different way? Not getting enough fresh air? Confused. Let me know if anybody can help. Thanks


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There must be a large vacuum source from the intake manifold and a method of controlling that vacuum at all throttle positions from high vacuum (idle)
to low vacuum (wide open).

BMW did an excellent job of design in the CCV. Purchase an oem unit and make your M62 happy again.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My thing is it is a smart design, sure but it has flaws my intake was swimming in oil and i really want to avoid all the blow by and moisture from getting into my intake it’s just un needed and not worth gunking my engine up. I want to figure out a way to run a catch can without harming the engine is all


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Discussion Starter #4
I’m using a catch that dosnt have a breather, should i use one that does?


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Check Timm's explanation of the CCV/OSV system:
https://www.meeknet.co.uk/e31/BMW_M60_M62_M62TU_Engine_Crankcase_Ventilation.htm

In a properly working vent system, oil does not collect in the manifold, as it is drained back into the sump via the Oil Separation Valve behind the
left timing chain setup. Likely your OSV is restricted with oily gunk, prevent drainback and shortening the life of your CCV.

You could do as this gent did, create a bypass with an OSV outside of the block:

(Sorry...UToob link wouldn't transfer. Look for Crankcase Ventilation E38.)

Check the other posts regarding catch cans for the E38. Tons of successful (and some not so) to be found. Also look for threads about cleaning
your OSV out by dropping the lower pan and flushing the unit with solvent. Interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I’d like to see the bypass your talking about because everywhere i look all these links i find are un detailed beat around the bush answers to my questions to say the least i just would like to figure out how to get this to work and not worry about the CCV again it is too much money time and hassle to open up the timing covers and replace the OSV and put it back together. I’m trying to do this so the car can move until i have the money to do the timing chain guides and the whole vanos system again and I’d rather do it all in one shot but I’m not in the position to do so at the moment so that’s why i want to make the catch work. My car does not smoke on startup or under load at all whatso ever it is clean and clear as a whistle out the exhaust when it runs but like i said it’s just building too much crank pressure and blowing oil out of the seals. Just want to figure out how to mimic the system until i can fix everything correctly but for the time being the car can’t be non-mobile it needs to be able to move for needed garage/driveway space etc


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I understand your need, Ian. But short of fixing your clogged oil separation cyclone you will have a compromise of some smoke
some leakage.

Sacrifice your oil cap and drill a hole to fit a 'old style' pcv valve, as you noted in your other post. Seal it well. Run the vacuum source from the
largest vacuum line possible, which would be a 'tee' into the brake booster line just off the manifold. Ditch the can and associated stuff.

You may still have some smoking, and your crankcase pressure will probably be higher than the engineered system, but it may get you by
until you can correctly repair your ailing system. Keep in mind, your cat converters don't like excessive oil, and your seals don't like excessive pressure.
That you already know.

No history of doing this myself on the M62, however. The BMW CCV/OSV system is designed to the operating characteristics of the engine, and performs
well. Attempts to bypass an ailing system is a compromise at best. Just be prepared if the 'bypass' doesn't work to your expectations.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After reading that link it made me wonder if i should remove my intake and plumb a line from where the crankcase vent tube would be and run the gasses into the catch straight from the opening and then use my old worn PCV that is technically still good re install it and run the other line off the catch back into the nipple for the PCV that way there is no leaks the vacuum is regulated like stock but the only difference would be there’s a catch in between the PCV and the cyclonic separator. Possible?


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I understand all complications and i am trying to ponder over somthing maybe possibly nobody has thought of yet


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Here’s an update so i installed a different catch can it’s billeted made for performance i mounted it temporarily to see if this would work and i got a heater hose and ran it under the manifold cut a spare old vent pipe i had off of the nipple and used the nipple to seal the heater hose so it is sealed and sending the crank pressure/gasses up into my catch can, i have it mounted higher up, and then i just ran it under the manifold under the coolant pipes routed it right into a brand new CCV valve i bought i have it running into the stock nipple. Seems that is the only way i can make the system function correctly and closest to stock. I’m not blowing oil out the seals, I’m not smoking on startups at ALL, it’s 0 out here in Michigan and there’s really nothing coming out of my exhaust except the effect as if you were to exhale a breath in cold weather that’s the extend of smoke if ANY at all on a cold start when it’s this cold outside. And I’m using a spare clean m62 manifold i had off a parts car with no oil in the runners and it runs beautifully again. No this does not delete the CCV, or fix my original issue with that diaphragm so i guess i will have to suck it up and deal with it, but it makes my engine run. crank pressure is effectively regulated and there’s no oil in my manifold so i fixed a lot of known issues and i don’t need to open my timing covers up. My engine has a lot of miles i believe 255,000 but i have tended to it and completely overhauled everything i possibly could on the outside of the block as far as vacuum, water pump, coolant pipes, valve cover seals, spark plugs, all new vacuum components on top of the manifold, all it would really need is coil packs i haven’t done those but they work i have no misfires and no check engine light. And the previous owner claimed the vanos and timing guides were done already around 190,000/200,000 in a personally owned garage his family had. There is things i don’t know about it as well as far as how they did the maintenance etc but that’s why I’m waiting to do the timing chains and guides with the cyclone separator by doing this because i know i can get a decent amount of life out of it now. It runs very smooth and nice and i couldn’t be any more satisfied personally, like i said those are all future plans for my car. i figured I’d update the thread as i know several people run into this same issue. I’m thinking about actually making a YouTube channel and my own videos on the things I’ve done to my car instead of people like me going and reading threads until 5am they can just open my channel and it will be all about the e38 and I’ll show exactly what i know i needed to know about the car top to bottom that I’ve learned and am still learning and I’m gonna put it to dummy terms for everyone so it’s simple and easy to figure out for the new guys like myself to these complicated cars. when your stressing about you’re beautiful e38, we all know these cars need a lot of maintenance and sometimes, instances like this will arise like this for us with them to where we need to just modify some things to make her right until we can save for a better, right way to fix it. These problems with the cyclone separator in the covers and vanos/guides are notoriously money draining plus they take a lot of time and headache if you haven’t messed with these engines before. and nobody wants to spend all their time and money on a car they just want for either a daily or a project whatever the case may be, personally i think e38’s don’t have enough information out there as far as at home maintenance goes to avoid the shops. Don’t get me wrong there are good shops out there but a lot of them just want you’re cash and service some places cut corners so your car never gets fixed the right way and you’ll come back for an engine replacement. I don’t like that about shops and that’s why i do everything myself so i know exactly what has been done to my car and what still remains needed to be done. So i will also update on this thread when i go through with doing that after i find the time. Thank you for all of the useful/helpful information you have to give on here i see you are one of few who reply but i see not a lot of people use this forum compared to bimmerforums.com but, it’s growing and it’s helpful at many times and i appreciate you all a lot i will definitely probably be making more threads for questions/ or even tips on this model. As you probably already know this imola red e38 is gonna need a lot of work to come


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Yes, that oil in the manifold looks, makes one feel bad

However, the times I have been looking around inside the front of the manifold, I do see oil but not enough to worry about hurting the valves. Doing the valley pan gasket i looked at all my exhaust valve and they were clean @ 140+K mi. That said, right before every oil change I put a bottle of Techtron (Chevron) cleaner in the tank.
Did that with this car too: http://www.xkedata.com/gallery/zoom/?id=337404
note bottom left in photo, the top of a K&N filter that sits atop a plastic catch can that got the fumes and blow by from the from engine cover. What (nasty) fumes that did exit the filter were sucked into the 3x2" carbs and onto the ITG foam air filter. BUT, before that, the rubber hose from the front of the engine cover was directed strait down to the ground.... :)
 
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