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Flying "Round the World"

957 Views 6 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  chuckster
Has anyone done ED via RTW tickets? I'm sure someone has on this forum, but I couldn't find a thread via searching. This thread alluded to RTW but the OP there wanted to use LH's 2-for-1 deal which wouldn't apply. (I googled this and contacted a couple sites that came up, but from lurking on this forum I know there is a lot of collective travel knowledge/experience here)

RTW tickets generally mean traveling continually in the same (eastern or western) direction until arriving home or your home continent, and not backtracking over the same region twice. So an eastbound RTW ticket would be something like US-Munich-ME/Asia/Australasia/Hawaii-ConUS.

Does anyone have experience of using a US-based travel agent to book an RTW ticket or vacation (even if it wasn't for ED)?
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I did this years ago in the other direction: PHL-SFO-Tokyo-Hong Kong-Bangkok-a few intermediate stops-Zurich-Amsterdam-London-PHL. The price was almost the same as PHL-Tokyo & Hong Kong-PHL. Now there are other route options such as via Tashkent or the UAE or whatever. Also, there is (or at least used to be) a big price jump if any of your cities are S of the equator.

If you need a travel agent, there is no reason to stay local. I have had good experiences with Amex--their people seemed to be trained to listen to whether you want the cheapest option or convenience or whatever. (Maybe that is just at the PTS level???)
Has anyone done ED via RTW tickets? I'm sure someone has on this forum, but I couldn't find a thread via searching. This thread alluded to RTW but the OP there wanted to use LH's 2-for-1 deal which wouldn't apply. (I googled this and contacted a couple sites that came up, but from lurking on this forum I know there is a lot of collective travel knowledge/experience here)

RTW tickets generally mean traveling continually in the same (eastern or western) direction until arriving home or your home continent, and not backtracking over the same region twice. So an eastbound RTW ticket would be something like US-Munich-ME/Asia/Australasia/Hawaii-ConUS.

Does anyone have experience of using a US-based travel agent to book an RTW ticket or vacation (even if it wasn't for ED)?
Thanks for the tip re: Amex - maybe I'll give them a shot. I don't plan to stay local for a travel agent but I figure I'll need a US-based one.

A lot of the sites coming up via googling are UK-based and they cater to RTW flyers leaving and returning to the UK. I've seen a couple comments saying a 1-way ticket to London is worth it for the savings offered by UK travel agents (apparently it's a much larger industry in the UK and the volumes lead to significantly lower fares), but I don't think it's worth it, at least not this time.
I believe United during the boom times actually had 2 RTW flights leaving in opposite directions. I think they had them as UA 1 and UA 2 flight numbers.

I believe it was like LAX-HKG-Delhi-London (some European city)-JFK-LAX

The other flight went like JFK-LHR-Delhi-HKG (or possibly NRT)-LAX-JFK

With the various airlines alliances, I'd bet if you were a frequent flier with some premium status levels that the status desk could help you out.
Does anyone have experience of using a US-based travel agent to book an RTW ticket or vacation (even if it wasn't for ED)?
This is exactly right . I've use United's RTW tix on several occasions - once for an ED. I haven't heard much about these fares recently, but I assume they still exist. I set mine up through United's 1K desk. Cost for biz class was about the same a full fare biz ticket from LAX>TPE>LAX

Dick
I believe United during the boom times actually had 2 RTW flights leaving in opposite directions. I think they had them as UA 1 and UA 2 flight numbers.

I believe it was like LAX-HKG-Delhi-London (some European city)-JFK-LAX

The other flight went like JFK-LHR-Delhi-HKG (or possibly NRT)-LAX-JFK

With the various airlines alliances, I'd bet if you were a frequent flier with some premium status levels that the status desk could help you out.
I decided to look up the history of the RTW flights. I found this, referring to the DC-6 era:

For almost 40 years, Pan Am westbound round-the-world route was Flight 001 originating in San Francisco with stops including Honolulu, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Manila, Kolkata, Delhi, Beirut, Istanbul, Frankfurt, London, and finally New York. The westbound flight lasted 46 hours after its first takeoff. Meanwhile, Pan Am Flight 002 circled the globe eastbound.
I did it on either a DC-7 or B707, so the stops were somewhat different. I do remember the following:
  • Pan Am could not fly across the US, so the PHL-SFO leg had to be on either AA, TW or UA.
  • The SFO-Tokyo flights could not make it non-stop. They alternately stopped in HNL or Anchorage (the shorter "great circle" route).
  • There was a stop in either India (what was then called Calcutta) or Pakistan (Karachi) alternating days of the week. I stopped in Karachi, I think.
  • Another stop was either Cairo or Athens, again alternating days of the week. (A few months later Tashkent became an option as that airspace opened up to US carriers.)
It was exciting at the time (mid-1960s), but I don't think I'd want to do it again now, even with faster aircraft.
RTW Singapore Airlinesq

Check out the Singapore Airlines web site. If you only fly Singapore Air you can do business class for about $5500. If you fly on a 777 or A380 it is about $500 extra. If you add their partners it is really expensive though. Check out Malaysian Airlines as their rates are good as well, especially if flying in Asia.This is business class, but it is the best as "advertised". The 777 we flew from Singapore to Frankfurt was fantastic. They actually have something called "book the cook". Check it out-even coach I am sure would be excellent.:rofl:
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