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Resident Curmudgeon
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Ive seen him before. Never made it through a whole video.

Sure thinks he knows it all. By virtue of a life spent working on ****ty used cars and clueless owners.

Having said that, some of his observations are good. ATF, plastic parts, etc etc.

But rich doctors and lawyers leasing cars as business expenses and paying nothing? Hardly.

And if his conclusion is that ***8216;don***8217;t buy a old BMW if you are poor AND cannot wrench***8217;, I very much agree.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ive seen him before. Never made it through a whole video.

Sure thinks he knows it all. By virtue of a life spent working on ****ty used cars and clueless owners.

Having said that, some of his observations are good. ATF, plastic parts, etc etc.

But rich doctors and lawyers leasing cars as business expenses and paying nothing? Hardly.

And if his conclusion is that 'don't buy a old BMW if you are poor AND cannot wrench', I very much agree.
Many comments say the the ones made in Germany are great. Those in USA and China are money pits.

Another interesting video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eS9duddPqUI
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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I am starting this thread just as a lark , to have some fun.

Do you guys agree with this guy ?
No. If he said the sky was blue, I’d check and wonder why he’s hiding behind dark glasses—did his spouse abuse him?
 

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No. If he said the sky was blue, I’d check and wonder why he’s hiding behind dark glasses—did his spouse abuse him?
Some older people are more sensitive to light. Specially with oncoming cataracts.

He has 3.4 million subscribers. He must be doing something good.

Only Taylor Swift has more subscribers :bigpimp:
 

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Six-cylinder, non-M BMW's only have one turbocharger.

His perspective is that his client base is people driving worn out cars. Cars don't last forever, not even BMW's. BMW's only last as long as you can get parts and can afford to throw money at them. I took my first BMW to 115k miles. Based on that last 15k miles, I now plan to call the next owners just as soon as the "1" shows up in the sixth digit of the odometers of our current BMW's and tell them to come pick up their car.

A friend of mine drives a Ford F-150. He's always asking me what's the big deal about BMW's. The best answer I came up with is that "Just about everything about them is better. Sometimes, things are lot better. Sometimes, they're just a little better." That "better" comes with a price, though.

Cramming all that "better" technology into an aerodynamic nose of a car does result in a very cramped engine compartment. That cramped engine compartment makes doing anything there more expensive. Things are a lot less crowded under the hood of my friend's F-150. The same thing is going on the cabin. To replace my cabin air filter required removing: console trim, glove box assembly, and the passenger airbag. To replace the cabin air filter in another friend's Nissan X-Terra, you open a visible door under the dashboard, remove the old filter and put in a new one.

The first two things that turn off most American car owners about BMW's are the need for premium gas and those $120 oil changes. But, things are changing. My Chevy Cobalt SS requires 91 AKI to perform as advertised, as does a Chevy Equinox SUV. Most cars now also require synthetic oil.

BMW's is the smallest of the non-boutique car manufacturers, with the exception of Volvo. Volvo is owned by the Chinese, and was bought to acquire western automotive technology, not to make a profit. BMW has to grow to stay competitive. That and meeting CAFE and CO2 emission regulations means BMW has to go down market. That's why BMW's now building FWD platforms (MINI, X1, X2, 2 Series Gran Coupe, and the 1 Series in Asian markets). But, as they go down market, they're going to have to improve quality and maintenance costs.

Here's the rear suspensions of a Chevy Cobalt and a first-generation VW Golf/Rabbit, and half of the rear suspension of a typical RWD BMW. The Golf and Cobalt suspensions are all just one welded piece of steel.

I recently got 40.2 MPG on a 14 mile drive in Frau Putzer's G01 X3 xDrive 30i, and that was with the air conditioning running. This was possible due to a lot of complexity: variable valve timing, twin-scroll turbocharging, variable valve lift (Valvetronics), direct fuel injection, electric water pump, electric power steering, computer controlled alternator, 8-speed transmission, articulated radiator grill shutters, etc. etc. etc.... and lots of aluminum and plastic on the car to keep weight down
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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BMW's only last as long as you can get parts and can afford to throw money at them. I took my first BMW to 115k miles. n
Sounds like you are an ultra high miler, eh?


I guess im just a rich guy throwing money at old cars. If I sold them all and began leasing it would be a money saver....
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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Some older people are more sensitive to light. Specially with oncoming cataracts.

He has 3.4 million subscribers. He must be doing something good.

Only Taylor Swift has more subscribers :bigpimp:
Y’all need to read H L Mencken while you can, before he is ‘cancelled’ and his books burned.

He said,
No one has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people.”
 

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Sounds like you are an ultra high miler, eh?


I guess im just a rich guy throwing money at old cars. If I sold them all and began leasing it would be a money saver....
I loved my 115k-mile BMW. But, it was becoming unreliable for schedule-critical road trips. I was returning from a schedule-critical road trip in my 72k mile, relatively reliable Chevy Cobalt when I had a rest stop revelation... I need a new BMW.

There's an optimal age and mileage when it's cheaper to replace a car than maintain it. For my first BMW, it was around 100k miles. So, that's what I'm shooting for with our current BMW's.

I had a part-time job with a Fortune 500 corporation back in the 1980's. Their field sales force had large American sedans as company cars. They did a study to determine the optimal mileage for replacing those cars, and found it was 80k miles. That was taking into account the lost productivity when a salesman was getting his older car repaired instead of doing his job of selling stuff.

Leasing a BMW only makes sense if you're racking up miles quickly, or if you're just hell bent on having a new one every three, four, five, or maybe six years. For my 535i, the first six years and 65k miles of ownership was pretty much a wash compared with what it would have cost leasing two of them. My savings in the 7th, 8th, and 9th years of ownership is where my savings will (likely) be huge, about $25k.

I'll have the belts, belt tensioner, thermostat and water pump replaced around 70k miles. Those are the big failure items that could **** up a schedule critical road trip.

The paint on my six year old 535i is in better shape than the paint on a friend's six month old M4... because he's an idiot.

People poo-poo my spreadsheets. But, spreadsheets are simply an automation of math and sound logic. It's not the spreadsheets they're poo-pooing, it's... math and sound logic they're poo-pooing.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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Gigo
 

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i kind of agree, here is why

the "better" part of a bmw is complex; as machines age complex stuff needs to be maintained and repaired
i like the "better"; but the "better" isn't free

from the other perspective;
if someone doesn't like the "better" then putting up with the added cost would suck
 

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Discussion Starter #15
During WW2, on the eastern front, it is a clear example of how the advanced German engineered Panzer tanks broke down in the field more often and were unable to be fixed on the battlefield and they needed to be sent to the base engineering depot
The Soviet T-37 tanks were simple engineered and easy to fix on the battlefield.
Germans lost the war on the Eastern front due to logistical nightmare and the winter.
 

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During WW2, on the eastern front, it is a clear example of how the advanced German engineered Panzer tanks broke down in the field more often and were unable to be fixed on the battlefield and they needed to be sent to the base engineering depot
The Soviet T-37 tanks were simple engineered and easy to fix on the battlefield.
Germans lost the war on the Eastern front due to logistical nightmare and the winter.
Sometimes German complexity helps, sometimes it doesn't. During the North Africa campaign of WWII, the U.S. Army's Harley-Davidson's were holding up to the heat and sand. The U.S. Army actually had Harley-Davidson duplicate some captured BMW motorcycles. The BMW's driveshaft survived the sand better than a chain, and the horizontally-opposed twin-cylinder engines could take the heat. The back cylinders on H-D's overheated. The BMW motorcycles also could send power to the sidecar's wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sometimes German complexity helps, sometimes it doesn't. During the North Africa campaign of WWII, the U.S. Army's Harley-Davidson's were holding up to the heat and sand. The U.S. Army actually had Harley-Davidson duplicate some captured BMW motorcycles. The BMW's driveshaft survived the sand better than a chain, and the horizontally-opposed twin-cylinder engines could take the heat. The back cylinders on H-D's overheated. The BMW motorcycles also could send power to the sidecar's wheel.
Of course everything German engineered is superior performance , including motorcycles.
Question is, if it breaks down, can it be repaired on the front lines or sent back to the far flung repair depot.
 

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Fool on the Hill
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First, I would never buy a brand new one. Better a cpo coming off lease, being sold by the same dealer who sold it new.

Second rule, no V8 cars, especially "hot vee" twin turbos. In fact, I would never buy a hot vee turbo V8 from any manufacturer.

Third, some complex options are more potential trouble than they add in value, comfort and convenience.

Fourth, stick to standard profile, non run flat tires. Get a spare tire.

Fifth, get a trusted, expert non dealer mechanic. And own a scan tool so you have some information of what may be wrong before you bring it in.

Knock on wood, my X5 diesel has been quite trouble free, now at 75,000 miles, But I realize the car could turn on me without a moment's notice.
 

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Of course everything German engineered is superior performance , including motorcycles.
Question is, if it breaks down, can it be repaired on the front lines or sent back to the far flung repair depot.
There area always those trade-off's. But a field-repairable tank or fighter aircraft is of no use if it's blown to pieces in combat by superior performing tanks or aircraft.

A lot of the front line maintenance of military equipment is the quick removal and replacement of sub-systems, not actually repairing those subsystems. That works as long as you have enough spare subsystems stacked up near the front lines.
 

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This guy for cars is like Jim Cramer for stocks. I do find him entertaining. Everything he says kind of makes sense, however, you can***8217;t really use his advice.
I would say that a 10-year old loaded BMW with 40k miles and mint condition at reasonable price is a great deal. Buy! Buy! Buy!
Contrary to what he said, used BMW has many advantages to other brands, e.g. huge aftermarket for parts, diagnostic software, discussion on any topic, YouTubes, mods, etc.
Take a stem valve seal job for example, there is a tool kit available specifically designed for BMW engine with countless instructions and videos online. Would any other brand have that?
Diagnostic software for $30 on eBay? Transfer case plastic gear for $10 on eBay? The list goes on and on...
Now, if you are an owner of used BMW, you absolutely have to be able to do some work on the car (changing control arms, water pump, spark plugs, various seals, etc. NOT pulling engines or replacing trannies) - there is no sugar coating to that and it is an absolute truth about used BMW OR just take an extended warranty. Otherwise, the cost of BMW repairs will break the budget.
P.S. I bought mine BMW 2009 X5 4.8 M-sport out of the lease with ~25k Miles back in 2012 and still enjoy driving it ***x1f609;
 

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