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Investigative Tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that it will be good news for Daniel anyway...

The S-54 oil filter housing (11 42 7 833 240) arrived today, along with all the other factory oil cooler parts for the S-52 turbo Coupe project.

I told Daniel I'd get a close look inside to see if the thermostat could be removed so the filter housing could be powder coated, and subsequently oven cured.

Not the most user friendly of internal retaining rings, but better than the mechanism being retained by swedged aluminum ;)





 

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Thanks!

Yes, could be worse. Actually doesn't look too bad to get out. Yes, they certainly could have used a clip with holed tabs to make it easy. But then we'd ask them to sell the thermostat separately instead of making us buy the whole housing. :)

Did you happen to take a rough measurement of the diameter? Maybe I can find a suitable replacement in case I tweak it on the way out.
 

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^yup, it's me^
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Hey Daniel,

I picked up the Chicago Electric powder coat gun a couple of days ago at HF(on sale for 59 bucks, couldn't, not get one) and as wondering what oven you are using. Yeah I know, it's a slippery slope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
dwm said:
Did you happen to take a rough measurement of the diameter? Maybe I can find a suitable replacement in case I tweak it on the way out.
No, but the S-52 housing is made identical, save for the actual groove for the circlip. It would be easy enough to figure out...
 

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CaliJeff said:
Hey Daniel,

I picked up the Chicago Electric powder coat gun a couple of days ago at HF(on sale for 59 bucks, couldn't, not get one) and as wondering what oven you are using. Yeah I know, it's a slippery slope.
For small parts (95% of what I do), I use an el-cheapo toaster oven in the garage and an IR thermometer. It's the same oven I use for surface-mount soldering. Never sees food.

Occasionally I'll use an old kitchen oven for larger parts, but it's a hassle because it's in my basement instead of in the garage (long walk from the powdercoating gun). If you've got room in the garage, an old freestanding oven works very well. Very few powders need anything above 400F (the high-temp ones want 500F cure; the rest are in the 350F to 400F range).

For occasional big parts, an IR heater works well. Considering the cost of electricity around here, I'd rather have a propane one. columbiacoatings.com has some pictures of the propane kind you'd want. They also used to sell a nice small powdercoating oven (18" cube inside if I remember correctly), but they stopped selling it. Too bad, it was a decent unit for around $350.

Some other things I've learned along the way...

There are things you'll need to get started. Silicone plugs and caps and powdercoating tape are a must. You'll also probably want some iron phosphate primer. You can get these at caswellplating.com.

You'll probably also want some stripper. Polyester TGIC powders will yield to methylene chloride metal strippers. This stuff is nasty, don't let it sit on your hands and use in a well ventilated area (outdoors). It doesn't have much of a scent, but don't let that fool you. While not generally recommended for aluminum, I've used it on aluminum. Just don't let it sit on there for more than 30 minutes. Once you've gotten 95% of the powder off of something with stripper, acetone and a rough cloth will often get the rest. Not your wife's nail stripper, you want the full-strength no-scents-or-colors-added acetone from the hardware store. Methylene chloride metal stripper can be found at the hardware or your local Lowe's or Home Depot.

Of course a sandblaster will work if you've got room for a blasting cabinet. The one on my wish list is about $1000. I personally wouldn't buy one without a good collection system and a clamshell type hood (whole top opens with sides and all, like your barbecue grill's hood). The cheapos tend to leak, making a mess of your work area. No point in having one if you have to use it outdoors. In other words, don't buy one from Harbor Freight. :)

Don't forget a good mask. No paper disposables here. While polyester TGIC powder isn't super-harmful and the VOCs when curing are very low (dramatically lower than paint), the dry powder is very fine and you'll be blowing it out your nose for hours. The good news is that unless it's heated to flow-out temperatures, it doesn't stick to anything. Clean-up is trivial compared to paint. Blast yourself off with the air blower when you're all done, but don't kill yourself doing it. It won't stain clothing. I mostly just blast my shoes since they don't see the washing machine. :)

Buy boxes of latex gloves too. Not to protect your hands, but to keep your oils off of the parts before coating.

When doing parts that aren't new, baking them before coating is a good idea (burns things off). I also pre-bake cast parts to help with outgassing issues (like my thermostat housing I did recently) and shoot them while still warm.

You can never have too many powder cups. Some colors get used frequently enough that you'll always want some in a cup (with a lid with a silicone gasket). Black and clear in my case. Blue if you were Ron. :) Keep your powders in a cool dry place for long-term storage. Basement works fine.

You'll want a mini-regulator attached to the gun. Doesn't need to be fancy, just needs to work. This way you can keep 80 psi in the hose but only 30 or so going into the gun. Eliminates trips to the compressor when switching from the blow gun to the powdercoating gun and back. I also always keep a disposable moisture filter attached to the gun. Even if you have a filter system, it'll prevent stuff from entering the gun when you're too lazy to switch hoses. I change mine every few months (I'd do it more often if I was doing a lot of powdercoating work).

A big rubbermaid tub is handy to keep everything in; gun, power unit, boxes of silicone plugs/caps, powdercoating tape, and powders you're using regularly. I keep my powdercoating tape in a big ziploc bag to keep it from picking up anything. The tape can handle high temps, but if not kept clean it'll pick up things that may burn in the oven and potentially ruin your work.

It's usually better to put too much powder on versus too little (especially with polyester TGIC which is durable at high builds). It's pretty much impossible to make powder run, but if you apply too thin, it won't flow out smooth. The flipside is that too much will yield more FLA (fat lady's ass). You'll get a feel for it, and it varies from powder to powder. Nothing wrong with wetsanding with sanding blocks and buffing to get things smooth afterward, with the exception of some metallics (the Black Chrome I use a lot isn't amenable to sanding out egghell because the 'chrome' floats to the top and the black clings to the part, so if you sand you wind up exposing black because the 'chrome' layer is really thin).

For example on thickness, when you're shooting clear powder, the part should look white before it goes in the oven. If you can still see the color underneath, you haven't applied enough clear powder. Clear is pretty good for getting a feel for thickness for this reason. Apply until the part is white, then stop.

For really thick parts (say a pound or more of metal that's not thin), I preheat the oven to more than the curing temperature of the powder, and use 'toast' (both top and bottom elements on) for the first 60 seconds or so. You'll get a feel for it. The problem with really thick parts is that they'll heat up so slowly that you sometimes won't get a smooth flow-out unless you use a higher temperature at the start and heat from both top and bottom. This is one of those things you just have to find a way around when using an oven that's not really intended for powdercoating. You'll have no trouble with smaller parts, and some powders flow out much better (and faster) than others.

If you goof when applying the powder, like wind up with the gun leaving a pile somewhere (not uncommon with these cheap guns), blow the whole part off and start over. It will save you time and money every time. Dry powder is cheap, and once cured, it's not much fun to remove. It won't magically heal itself in the oven. Sometimes when you get a pile its due to some moisture in the powder itself, and when baked it won't flow out smooth. Only way to know is to bake it, and it's not worth taking the chance of having to strip and start all over.

Speaking of piles, never hold the gun directly above the part while shooting. With these cheap corona guns, you're just begging to have a pile fall on the part. Always shoot roughly horzontally.

Above all, have fun with it and post some pictures when you're happy with some results! Shoot some scrap metal or parts that are easy to strip or that you don't care so much what they look like, then move up from there. Remember that like paint, surface prep is most of the work. By the time you start spraying the powder, more than 90% of the work is behind you. the big bonus over paint for me is that I can use the part as soon as it's cooled off. No waiting 24 hours or longer for a chemical cure.
 

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Living on the redline
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after reading all that I'd rather take it to someone else :dunno:
 

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Randy Forbes said:
retained by swedged aluminum
I've heard that term all my life. But I had no idea that's how one would spell "swedged". Ha! Learn something new every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
TurnAround said:
I've heard that term all my life. But I had no idea that's how one would spell "swedged". Ha! Learn something new every day.
Just part of the value added service we provide here at bimmerfest... :rofl:
 

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dwm said:
For small parts (95% of what I do), I use an el-cheapo toaster oven in the garage and an IR thermometer. It's the same oven I use for surface-mount soldering. Never sees food.

Occasionally I'll use an old kitchen oven for larger parts, but it's a hassle because it's in my basement instead of in the garage (long walk from the powdercoating gun). If you've got room in the garage, an old freestanding oven works very well. Very few powders need anything above 400F (the high-temp ones want 500F cure; the rest are in the 350F to 400F range).

::::SNIP:::::

Above all, have fun with it and post some pictures when you're happy with some results! Shoot some scrap metal or parts that are easy to strip or that you don't care so much what they look like, then move up from there. Remember that like paint, surface prep is most of the work. By the time you start spraying the powder, more than 90% of the work is behind you. the big bonus over paint for me is that I can use the part as soon as it's cooled off. No waiting 24 hours or longer for a chemical cure.
Thanks Daniel:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Speed00 said:
It's not,
the term is "Swaging" so it would be "Swaged".

I worked for a company that made tie rods for fighter planes (Tyee Aircraft).
They made rods similar to this only for planes.

http://www.dunegoon.org/sandrail/swagedrods.html
I stand corrected. Just that my mouth won't pronounce it the way it's spelled.
 

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B-Rad
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Don't worry Randy, probably the last time I knew something you guys didn't. My boss used to correct the way I said it all the time..... :(
 

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The big Swag

Randy Forbes said:
I stand corrected. Just that my mouth won't pronounce it the way it's spelled.
Watch more monster garage Randy, here the big swag talk about swaging. Just thought I'd swedge this in here.:rolleyes:
Steve
 
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