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So I was coming home from some wine tasting event today with some coworkers.

I stopped to get gas. As I was filling up, I noticed my right rear tire was going flat, and was clearly very low on air. The tire was almost flat. Drive the car up to the air pump, and found only 10 psi in the tire, but the rim was still an inch off the ground.


I didn't notice anything strange in the way the car drove earlier that day, which makes me think I ran over the screw shortly before stopping for gas.

I noticed the screw sticking into the tread right near the edge of the outer sidewall. Putting my ear close, I could hear a faint hissing sound. I noticed that if I pressed on the screw, the hissing sound would stop.

So I parked the car and rolled it back so that the screw head would be pressed between the tire and the ground. Hopefully it will bleed less air like that overnight.

I guess I'll have to go to the tire shop tomorrow morning to see what can be done.

So my main question is, are tire patches reliable, or should I just get a whole new tire?

I wonder if I got any road hazard coverage for stuff like this. :dunno: I just got the rear tires three months ago.

But these tires wear fairly quickly. I don't want to buy just one new tire and then have the car constantly pull to one side on the highway.

Bummed me out. I haven't had a flat tire in literally 15 years. :mad:
 

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Sh*t happens. Find your receipt and go back to where you bought the tires. Perhaps there's a road hazard guaranty on them. As for wearing, how much could they have worn in three months?
 

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So I was coming home from some wine tasting event today with some coworkers.

I stopped to get gas. As I was filling up, I noticed my right rear tire was going flat, and was clearly very low on air. The tire was almost flat. Drive the car up to the air pump, and found only 10 psi in the tire, but the rim was still an inch off the ground.

I didn't notice anything strange in the way the car drove earlier that day, which makes me think I ran over the screw shortly before stopping for gas.

I noticed the screw sticking into the tread right near the edge of the outer sidewall. Putting my ear close, I could hear a faint hissing sound. I noticed that if I pressed on the screw, the hissing sound would stop.

So I parked the car and rolled it back so that the screw head would be pressed between the tire and the ground. Hopefully it will bleed less air like that overnight.

I guess I'll have to go to the tire shop tomorrow morning to see what can be done.

So my main question is, are tire patches reliable, or should I just get a whole new tire?

I wonder if I got any road hazard coverage for stuff like this. :dunno: I just got the rear tires three months ago.

But these tires wear fairly quickly. I don't want to buy just one new tire and then have the car constantly pull to one side on the highway.

Bummed me out. I haven't had a flat tire in literally 15 years. :mad:
Yes, they are very reliable. I had a similar thing happen right after I got new Goodyear GS-D3's. I noticed that the right rear tire looked really low, looked and saw a nail in it. :bawling: Went to fill it up and it was down to around 20psi, so I filled it up and drove it over to the shop where I bought them thinking I might need a new tire. He said no problem, he'd patch it, said it would be as good as new, last for the life of the tire and I was out of there in 15 minutes. That was around 8 or 9 months ago and no problems since.

However, my nail was in the middle of the tread area. If it's too close to the sidewall, you may have to replace the tire as I don't think they can fix sidewall punctures. Just depends on where it is, but if they're only 3 months old without too many miles, I would think you could get by with just replacing the one tire if it comes to that.
 

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From what I understand, fixing tire holes depends on their location. Also, sometimes the roadside hazard insurance coverage depends on the location. I think it's best to talk to the shop; my coworker just had a screw in the sidewall on his truck, and a local shop fixed it for 7 bucks and it's been fine for over three months now. It all depends on the size of the hole, the angle, and whether or not it needs a plug or if one will fit.

Road hazard coverage is usually pretty explicit - meaning that it's typically extra and not included. I would think that if you got your tires three months ago, though, there might be a factory warranty provided you haven't gone over a certain number of miles. Check your paperwork.

If you end up needing to buy one new tire you might want to take the time to check your spare. Put your left rear tire on there and get a new set of rears.
 

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also keep in mind that after a tire puncture repair, that that tire is no longer good for the rated speed.
 

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I Am The Machine
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Patches are reliable at normal speeds and if they aren't too close to the sidewall.
I have one in my tire right now, I actually just deleted the picture of where the screw was, it was just barely on the border of where they could fix it.
I still wouldn't want to run on it too long, but it stays till I can get my tires done.
 

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If it's on the tread, go to walmart and get a tire repair kit. They're awesome. I had a screw in my tire just like you (and actually needed a screwdriver to back the screw out) and repaired it and it's been fine ever since. It was probably about 20,000 miles ago. I don't plan on going the tire's 168 mph speed rating anytime soon anyway.
 

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Just try to find a place that patches tires not just plugs them. You can usually identify such a place by either the fact that they sell lots of different kinds of tires(like tractor and truck tires) or if they have a tire spreader in the shop. These look like some sort of torture device with large arms and hooks and such what. Or just ask them how they patch a tire. To do it right the tire should be removed from the rim, ground and then a rubber patch glued on(very much like repair a bicycle inner tube)
 

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Run Far
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If it's on the tread, go to walmart and get a tire repair kit. They're awesome. I had a screw in my tire just like you (and actually needed a screwdriver to back the screw out) and repaired it and it's been fine ever since. It was probably about 20,000 miles ago. I don't plan on going the tire's 168 mph speed rating anytime soon anyway.
+1. I always have a plug kit and mini compressor in my trunk. The last thing I wanna do is unmount the tire and replce it with the spare. Been doing this for 20+ years without any problems. It's amazing to me how people will go miles upon miles with worn suspension parts, but the second they get a small hole in the tire, it's game over?
 

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I also got a flat just the other day from a long-ass screw too. I just got the tires like 2 months ago...but I dont think I got any road side harzardous guarantee on it or anything. Just went to a fix-a-flat place and got it plugged up...no leaks so far.
 

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Just try to find a place that patches tires not just plugs them. You can usually identify such a place by either the fact that they sell lots of different kinds of tires(like tractor and truck tires) or if they have a tire spreader in the shop. These look like some sort of torture device with large arms and hooks and such what. Or just ask them how they patch a tire. To do it right the tire should be removed from the rim, ground and then a rubber patch glued on(very much like repair a bicycle inner tube)
Agreed, patching (rather than plugging) is ALWAYS the preferred method of repairing flats.
 
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