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Discussion Starter #1
I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
Someone once told me... "If I go to college, I'll be 23 when I graduate! 4 years!"

I responded, "How old will you be in 4 years if you don't go?"

Only 37% of American adults have a 4 year degree. Be one of them.

Best wishes.

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You'd be better off if you're getting an "economically relevant" education. My nephew Beavis has an MIS degree, and is dong great. He went though a phase were he quit a good job and lived off of donations from people watching him play video games. He's really good at them, apparently. But, he's back on track. He recently approached his boss, reminding him that he's generated much or profit for the company that others making what he makes, and he got a decent raise.

Being an adult and out on your own supporting yourself makes you a better student. If you can tolerate the military, the Montgomery GI Bill has a lot of benefits for being in the "selective reserves" (one weekend/month and two weeks in the summer).

My cousin's daughter is the closest thing I have to a descendent. She just finished up a MA in Journalism and Public Affairs. She's still sending out applications for jobs. She has a fallback for a government job where she worked in the summers. But, she's trying to avoid that.
 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:

There are many advantages to college life having nothing to do with a degree.

The degree itself speaks to your ability to get things done, and speaks with confidence, regardless of what major you pursue.

Highly, highly recommended. You'll learn a few things there, and have access to more things after graduation, not otherwise available. You'll see....


Be this guy:

Graduate.gif

Not this or the other guy:

Beer.gif
Behind the 8 ball.gif


Of course you don't need a degree to achieve what you want, but sure is easier with than without. There're few substitutes for expert instructors and rare is the guy who can educate himself. Rare...but not unheard of! How motivated are you?


Einstein.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There are many advantages to college life having nothing to do with a degree.

The degree itself speaks to your ability to get things done, and speaks with confidence, regardless of what major you pursue.

Highly, highly recommended. You'll learn a few things there, and after graduation, not otherwise available. You'll see....


Be this guy:

View attachment 902135

Not this guy or that guy:
View attachment 902137
View attachment 902139


Of course you don't need a degree to achieve what you want, but sure is easier with than without. There're few substitutes for expert instructors and rare is the guy who can educate himself. Rare...but not unheard of! How motivated are you?


View attachment 902141
How motivated are you?
I really like my current job. But it comes with down sides. If the economy get worse, there wont be a lot of buyers looking to buy cars. Even with the crazy 0% APR financing etc. When I see that I've got 2.5 years-3 years left of school I'm like "I've got 3 years left and I'll be out of school hopefully with a decent job and living well. So it's some what of a no brainer to not go back".
 

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I did Honors Undergraduate and dropped out after two years to enlist 1969.

My career employer considered my education, training, experience equivalent to a postgraduate engineering degree for my qualification to direct testing operations. I retired early at 47 y.o., after 25 years. Then I went back to college for all of the maths, physics and literature that I wanted, about 400 hours in ten years.

My undergraduate curriculum was inspired by Alexander Meiklejohn, commonly known as The Great Books Curriculum. A degree is worth only what effort you put into it, and what knowledge you take with it.

I served six years active duty and my comittment was up during an economic downturn. I left the Navy in April and had an appointment to a four year IBEW Marine Electrician apprenticeship by September. My employ was guaranteed for the term and my wage started at 80% working level and incremented at each quarter. I graduated Valedictorian of a class of 300. I immediately became nuclear Leadingman for my USN experience, with a crew of one - me. I worked as Leadingman for two years, when I was hired into Nuclear Engineering Department, Test Engineering Division. I went to General Dynamics Electric Boat basic nuclear engineering school and later USN Advanced Reactor Technology.
 

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How motivated are you?
I really like my current job. But it comes with down sides. If the economy get worse, there wont be a lot of buyers looking to buy cars. Even with the crazy 0% APR financing etc. When I see that I've got 2.5 years-3 years left of school I'm like "I've got 3 years left and I'll be out of school hopefully with a decent job and living well. So it's some what of a no brainer to not go back".

To make real money, found a business and make it work.

That last part....harder than it sounds. Be prepared for 12 hr days at least 6 days/wk for a while. Quite a while. Be certain you're a guy who's just gotta have control, the universal trait of successful entrepreneurs.

Huge effort. Commensurately rewarding. Find something & sell it - most are not cut out for that - have sales experience? Invaluable.
 

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There is value beyond money.

My civilian counterpart title was Start-up Engineer, and they were a dime-a-dozen. They got paid well, about twice what I got, but had no job security.

We had a US Merchant Marine Academy middie graduate (four year US Service Academy degree) come to my office and qualify. But he wanted more money and left for civilian employ. At that time Argentina was trolling for plant engineers, for one year unaccompanied trips - US$100K and more. A few months later he came back to our office telling of being in a cantina when it was machinegunned and he had to crawl out the back door with his beer cup clenched in his teeeth. ***8220;Ain***8217;t no money worth that!***8221;
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To make real money, found a business and make it work.

That last part....harder than it sounds. Be prepared for 12 hr days at least 6 days/wk for a while. Quite a while. Be certain you're a guy who's just gotta have control, the universal trait of successful entrepreneurs.

Huge effort. Commensurately rewarding. Find something & sell it - most are not cut out for that - have sales experience? Invaluable.
I also was thinking about flipping houses with my friend who used to do construction work. He went to a community college for 2 years, got an associates degree in marketing. He chose not to go to a 4-year university. Instead, he got his real estate license and flips houses with his dad. The last house he flipped, he made 70k off of it. I thought about making the car business my main source of income and flipping houses on the side since I am kind of into the housing market also.
 

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Frau Putzer and two of her siblings are educated far beyond their intelligence. Frau Putzer has a teaching degree. Spring semester of her senior year she did student teaching and realized she can't stand being around kids. She ended up as a medical technologist, pulling down $100k/year with overtime. Her sis' has a MS in marine biology and actually worked in her field. Her bro is an attorney, living off of asbestos and people spilling 200 degree coffee on their crotch. Her oldest brother was a surf bum in the summer and a ski bum on the winter, never set foot in a college classroom. He ended up owning a outboard motor repair business. He seems to be doing o.k.: big boat, airplane, house in the Bahamas, hot girlfriend, etc.
 

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Sigh. My daughter has an earned doctorate, a Doctor of Pharmacy PharmD, after nine years. Her loans are paid off and she has bought her first house. Her first professional work was in Makawao, Maui, Hawaii, where she met her graduate (4+2?) chef husband, my SiL. About cars, she is still driving her undergraduate Civic that has been to Hawaii and back.
 

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What do you want to do with your life ? What do you want as a job / career ? The answers to these questions sometimes dictate what you can or must do. For example, if you want to be an accountant, then you MUST go to college in order to get the professional designation - there is no other choice.

As a general rule of thumb though - education is never a bad thing.
 

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To succeed you need 1) drive and 2) education. The former is found within, the latter found without.

There are many types of education, not just a college degree. Between various BS’s and MS’s, I have a total of 5 (two in separate sciences), and enough assorted and completely unrelated certifications to paper the wall in my office. I’ll retire from 2 different full time jobs, both with stellar pensions and retirement plans, at the same time in my 50s. The graduate degrees are responsible for one, my certifications/licenses (no college required) responsible for the other. Once retired, I can continue to use my various licenses/certs just to stay busy and get some spending cash if I feel like it. So, in my case, college both was worth it and not worth it; if I’d gone down the road for my cert-based career immediately out of HS, I’d currently be ahead, having saved 12 years of post-HS tuition, but I’d be doing a lot more traveling and wouldn’t have as great of retirement benefits as the other career. 30 years in the merchant marines would get old by the end, I’m sure, I’m already feeling it. Always look down the road; ask yourself at 22 when you want to retire and how comfortably you want to do it, and start planning on making that happen now.

Whether it be an apprenticeship, on the job training, certification courses, trade school, or actual college, the key is continuing to education yourself. Even if all you want to do is be a custodian, strive to be the best damned custodian you can be, and people will take notice.


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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Honestly, I have no clue what I want to do. I enjoy my current job, selling cars. I work 40 hours/week both on hourly and commission base. I've thought about going to trade school, becoming a master technician, and working for BMW. Even getting a real estate license and flipping houses with my friend and his dad. I was never really good at school since middle school. I was absent for half of my junior year of high school (health reasons). My sister who's 26 is getting her Ph.D. in Physiology. She's been in school for 8 years. I can't do that :tsk: I guess I'm basically going to school because it's what my parents want me to do. If it was up to me, I think I would just get my associate's degree and stay in the automotive industry and see how far I can get. The GSM at my job used to be a sales consultant (8 years) like me and was making over $85k/year. Now as a GSM, he's making about $165k/year. My dad came from India to the US in the 80s. Didn't attend college and now is making over $175k/year working at an Injection Molding Company as an engineer. Again, with no college degree just a load of experience.
 

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Then ask your dad.

You keep on with the annual incomes. YOU are not in ***8220;the auto industry***8221;. YOU are just a salesman, a tout. I wonder what Jeffery Epstein***8217;s annual compensation was, and he is dead.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Then ask your dad.

You keep on with the annual incomes. YOU are not in "the auto industry". YOU are just a salesman, a tout. I wonder what Jeffery Epstein's annual compensation was, and he is dead.
Both my parents want me to attend college. They think college isn't a struggle.
 

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A long ago friend raced a Sunbean Imp, a real challenge. He had reminders on his dashboard. Nothing difficult is ever easy. If it was easy then everyone would do it.

Ahh, and I recollect that he was a graduate salesman for BASF.

College is only the struggle that you make it. My younger brother graduated with a teaching certificate and degree in mathematics. And I held him many nights as he struggled with bad acid LSD trips. He was probably a better teacher for that.
 

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A long ago friend raced a Sunbean Imp, a real challenge. He had reminders on his dashboard. Nothing difficult is ever easy. If it was easy then everyone would do it.

Ahh, and I recollect that he was a graduate salesman for BASF.

College is only the struggle that you make it. My younger brother graduated with a teaching certificate and degree in mathematics. And I held him many nights as he struggled with bad acid LSD trips. He was probably a better teacher for that.
College is only the struggle that you make it. . I feel like it's only a struggle for me because my mind starts going blank when it's time for tests and quizzes. Maybe I've got test antiexty.
 

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The best years of my life I’ll never get back were in college. 7 years in a fraternity, and all that it brought, are the reasons. That includes when I went back for more degrees at 25. I don’t care if it had cost me 10x what it did, it was worth it!

::Queue the Van Wilder and Wooderson imagery::

Running a research boat for the school, for a class I was concurrently taking, was also pretty cool, a result of those other licenses I mentioned.


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