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.........
I mean, we all drive BMWs so that's kinda funny. My excuse is that mine is 12 years old. hahahhaha
If you don't spend $100K a year impressing other people, you don't need to earn $150K a year to stay afloat.
..,.......
Live within your means, take time to enjoy the world around you, work to live, do not live to work.
+1.

Your car is transportation not aspiration.....
 

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I have a BS in Comp Sci; University of Pittsburgh, 1988; never used it, couldn't now even if I wanted to.

My wife & I were both working full-time jobs while we attended college full-time. (she's a PharmD)
When I graduated, I was working in television production, something that had absolutely nothing to do with what I studied in college.
Life Choice Point: continue making good money doing something I really enjoy, or become Dilbert?
I stayed in tv.

My career is different now than it was then, but I absolutely LOVE what I do right now.
Unfortunately, my entire industry is currently illegal, but that's a story for another day.

College now is obscenely expensive.
Do you REALLY get to broaden your horizons by being exposed to different ideas?
I obviously have an opinion about this, but no one cares about my opinion except me. :)

Covid is going to put some hurt on a LOT of colleges; not just the ones mentioned above.
When it comes right down to it, ALL colleges are "for profit"; some are just more honest about it.
It'll likely take a year or 2 for people to start asking why they're paying full tuition for online classes, and that's going to start an avalanche.

One reason to get a college degree:
The automated job application filtering software will discard your application if you don't have that box checked.

Knowing someone is important; I had a whole lot of right-place-right-time things go my way, and more than 1 "I know this guy" type of situation.
I never made any contacts in college; we were too busy working to keep a roof over our heads and mac & cheese on the table to spend much social time with classmates.

I have put in some good words for several people, and they've gotten hired, so full circle there.

How's that for a very wordy non-answer?
"It's up to you."

Also, take a long hard look at "stuff".
Do you want that big house because you have a big family, or because you want people to see that you have a big house?
How many times have you been driving with someone, and you see a development of gigantic houses, and 1 of you will say "wow, those are nice houses".
But they're not, they're just BIG. They're all poorly-built identical lumps of stucco.
I mean, we all drive BMWs so that's kinda funny. My excuse is that mine is 12 years old. hahahhaha
If you don't spend $100K a year impressing other people, you don't need to earn $150K a year to stay afloat.
Put 10% of every dollar you get paid in a shoe box or something.
Rainy days can come out of nowhere; ask any of the 35 million of us who are currently not working in the US.

Do what you love, and you'll never work a day in your life.

Live within your means, take time to enjoy the world around you, work to live, do not live to work.

I am in college “industry” or as once was called, higher education.
Question about online vs. in seat is as old as internet itself. You have three types of students to satisfy:
1. Want all online. They are IMO worst students.
2. Want only in class. They are there for experience and love to argue. 90% of active and retired military goes into this category.
3. Want in class, but due to circumstances will take online. Deployed forces etc.
You are right, all colleges have to make money. But they are not for profit. I am in state university, and we have to generate revenue to stay afloat as only 5% of our budget comes from state (YES 5%). Bit, we don’t give dividends to shareholders etc. If we generate profit it goes toward scholarships, improving facilities, paying debt, wage increases etc.
on other hand CTU, University of Phoenix is not going to open local nonprofit center that helps people during natural disasters (most important component when it comes to helping people during natural disasters). State university will or other nonprofit schools. Colorado College for example is this uber expensive liberal arts private school that runs one of the best business incubators in the country. You will not see that from University of Phoenix.


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I dont have a degree. I wish I did. Life and finances made completing college a challenge. I would strongly advise getting a degree if it is realistic for you. But on that same token, I'm pretty darn successful as a network engineer without one. However, I hold some very significant industry specific certifications that outweigh a traditional degree. If you have the means, absolutely get your education.
 

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Yes, went to college. Graduated with my BS in 25 months, worked for 2 years then completed my MBA in 14 months. Was it worth it, yes, did it make my career, no. Hard work and not being afraid to take on difficult problems was far more important than either degree. Is college the best choice for everyone, no. The world needs trades people, this also is real education that doesn’t happen to come with a college degree. We are doing a disservice to everyone by believing we all need a college degree, it’s simply not true.
 

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BS in industrial design here. 16k In 4 years...

I***8217;d say try out community college classes. See how you like the classes, the people you meet, etc.

Fight or flight
 

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I think, like most things in life, it depends.

Growing up, college was never presented as an option to me - my parents made it clear I was going, it was just a matter of where, and what I'd be majoring in (engineer, architect, doctor were my options).

So, I went. I started school as an electrical engineering/comp sci major in 1999, when the job market was hot. People with bachelors degrees in those fields were getting starting salaries of $80k+. However, shortly after starting school, 2 things happened.

First, the dot com bubble bust, and engineering degrees were no longer a golden ticket.

Secondly, and probably more importantly, I realized I hated engineering. I had zero passion for it. So, I ended up switching to Econ and Political Science, but only under the condition that I would attend law school.

I was fortunate enough to have my parents pay for my undergrad education, so I was able to graduate debt-free. I attended law school on my own dime, and even after 10 years of practice, still have a ton of student debt. That said, I can't say I regret the decision. However, I probably would've done things differently.

One thing I didn't realize at the time was that college isn't trade school. In other words, you don't go to learn practical job skills. This might be less true for the hard sciences, but even then, I think it still applies. So, if you think a college education will "help you get a job," that may or may not be true.

What college does do, in my opinion is teach you how to learn. How to think critically. This is probably true regardless of major.

It's also a safe and nurturing environment to complete the maturation process. I didn't think this at the time, but at 18 years old, you're still a kid. Hell, even at 22, you're still a kid. But, those 4-5 years of development can be critical. Do you want to spend them in the "real world" equipped with only a high school education, or do you want to spend them in an environment where you continue to learn, and are surrounded by smart, but not necessarily like-minded people?

So, I wouldn't spend too much time thinking about the ROI of a degree since those statistics can be very misleading. Does an art history major generally make less than a software engineer? Sure. But, would someone who has an aptitude for art history have that same aptitude for writing code? I doubt it. Instead, I'd think long and hard about intangible benefits of college, and whether the experience of college will be worth it to you. Ultimately, it's a very personal decision.

As someone who has reviewed a ton of resumes and hired many people, I can tell you that a person's education is one of the last things I care about. If anything, it's a checkbox if the job requires it. Instead, I focus on the person's work experience, their drive/ambition, and whether I think they can add value to my team. Will college teach you those things? Again, it depends.
 

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Yes, yes, and yes. I started in ***8216;86 and dropped out after 2+ years, and entered the Navy followed by the civilian workforce. Not having was always a sore spot personally, and I knew my advancement potential as I got older was waning. I finished my business degree 2 years ago at age 50. It was a tremendous personal achievement, I was incredibly proud of myself. It will level the playing field for future advancement opportunities. So again, yes.
 

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Getting a college education improves your chances of earning a decent living and being less under the supervision (and control) of others. There are also intellectual benefits that come with higher education and it gives you a broader perspective on life.

I got my Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 1979 and worked in hospitals and treatment program for a few years before starting up my own clinical and research program in the mid-1980's. I would never have been able to be that independent if I didn't have an advanced degree. I highly recommend higher education for these many reasons.
 

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Going to college - worth it?

OP, it really depends on what you want to do, but when you are young, it is tough to know. You might want to check out "onetonline.org". About 1,000 occupations in the data set and what it takes to be prepared. It also has some good exploration tools. Site is populated by employers contributing data, so it is pretty accurate as to what is expected. One issue, however, is it is based on occupational codes and some jobs do not have a code. Good luck!
 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
You should do something you have a passion for. It will make the money less hard to earn. SWMBO has two brothers that could've been engineers. One was happy to be a MN bachelor farmer with a side piece. The other was fine running machine shops and owning garages. Raised two fine kids after surviving Vietnam.

Part of the answer is how much does the cost pay back. Part of the answer is how much do you want to find out how good you really are. I can only claim to have blundered thru life well. A hitch in the military will never hurt your job prospects in this day and age. I hear the training is quite good.
 

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I dropped out of high school in 11th grade and joined the Navy at 17. 22 years later I retired from Active duty and started an Internet software business with a partner. I burned out in 2 years and sold out in 1999. Moved to Japan and landed an IT engineering role in an investment bank. After the 2008 crisis I quadrupled my salary and finally retired at 56. Now we live off income streams from investment properties and several pensions. I paid 7 figures USD in cash for our apartment. And I drive a 2019 523d to save on fuel costs.

If I had to do it all over again I wouldn***8217;t change a thing. My fondest professional memories are from my Navy days as a submariner.

Having said all that I still would advise you to get a degree, but only if you***8217;ve discovered your passion.

Few of the college classes I took while in the Navy had any real bearing on my later success. Except mathematics and algorithms courses.
 

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If you work for free for four years at a company you want to eventually want to work at you will be further ahead and with no debt. No way is college worth it - from a graduate of Syracuse University! And they will probably hire you before 4 years.
 

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Haven't read any of the other responses, so I apologize if this answer duplicates a prior response. I've hired a bunch of people and a degree only mattered for entry-level positions, and that is if no one else had actual work experience. Having a degree meant you were able to follow-through with something. That's all. I have a degree from a major university that is relatively useless expect as trivia. Unless you plan on being a Dr., lawyer, CPA, engineer, etc., liberal arts degrees are pretty useless. So, figure out what you really want to do with your life. If it's doesn't require a professional degree, don't spend a lot of money on your education in school, but do spend money to educate yourself. Find an entry-level job in that field, learn everything you can about that field, then work your ass off. Find a mentor in the field. Be able to understand the financial side of the business, and the sales and marketing side of the business. You will rise through the ranks. As you do, hire the smartest people you can, based on what they've accomplished, not where they went to school. There's a reason your educational background is at the bottom of your resume, it's because that's where it belongs. Lastly, be the solution, not the problem.
 

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Yes! Masters in 1982 and went to work. In 1996, went back for PH.D. Scared and older, but finished in less than 4 years. Incredible opportunities opened. What a fabulous career I have had. I will retire Soon with 33 years of service. I also note that my Husband, who served in Navy for four years, stopped at his Masters. I may be biased, but with his life experiences, education, and common sense, he is the smartest man I know! I tell younger folks that I mentor, if someone tells you you can***8217;t, get them out of your way and move forward!
 

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Totally agree Steve57. I've worked at 5 of the top 10 advertising agencies from NYC to SF and never once been asked where I went to college. Putting young people into the kind of debt colleges require is nonsense.
 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
Please get that degree. I have done okay without one but there have been opportunities that I could not take advantage of because I did not have that slip of paper. You are young and have plenty of years left in which to make your success. There will be jobs that you cannot even apply for if you don't have it. I have been frustrated with that several time. You will get tired of selling cars.
 

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Go to college and stop using CVID-19 or future no one can predict as excuses. You are currently stuck in some 9-5 paper pushing job now and you think that’s the best of you from you? OR, join the military and do something more exciting! Those who don’t take risks are the one stuck where they are - and college is really not even taking a risk! Go to college.
 

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Hmmmm. A simple question that requires a complex answer. I got two BS Degrees in Engineering that allowed me to work in my dream field - research and development in semiconductors. I was lucky to not have college loans. Today, I would recommend picking a degree that is highly needed in the marketplace, then work in that field and make it your passion.

If you are the type of person who is super self-motivated and driven AND you have woo - the ability to draw people in and "sell" them, then you could skip the college degree and make your own business and career. Otherwise, stick with the college degree, but ONLY a degree in high demand.
 

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Yes, let's all encourage our 20 year olds to start life $50-100K in debt. Wonderful advice. It will only take you until your 40's to pay it off.
 
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