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Anti-Hack
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Foreign parents don't understand that. They think college is the only way to a successful life. I love my job, but had to quit because of the virus and school.

If you want a career that requires a college degree (medicine, engineering, et al) they’re right. I’m assuming they’d prefer you to be a surgeon than a heavy equipment operator, though I know many operators who do better than the towns doctors, combined.


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Discussion Starter #82
If you want a career that requires a college degree (medicine, engineering, et al) they’re right. I’m assuming they’d prefer you to be a surgeon than a heavy equipment operator, though I know many operators who do better than the towns doctors, combined.


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They wanted me to go into the computer field first because a family friend said "that's the best field to get into". But, I never took an interest in it. Then they wanted me to do Mechanical engineering because I'm into cars. But I',m not into the building and designing them. I am more into working on them and learning more about them. Now I'm studying operation and information management because a friend of mines said he can help me out in the field and hook me up with a job after I graduate. I have 2.5 years left until I graduate. That's if I don't get cold feet once again.
 

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They wanted me to go into the computer field first because a family friend said "that's the best field to get into". But, I never took an interest in it. Then they wanted me to do Mechanical engineering because I'm into cars. But I',m not into the building and designing them. I am more into working on them and learning more about them. Now I'm studying operation and information management because a friend of mines said he can help me out in the field and hook me up with a job after I graduate. I have 2.5 years left until I graduate. That's if I don't get cold feet once again.

OK, but what do you like? Gotta be more than working on cars....
 

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I got a job, as an electricians apprentice. Eventually became a wireman. I make a ton of money, got a great pension and heath care. Along the way, I bought a 6 plex, and then a 4 plex. got an associate degree, then a BA. Now I'm ready to live. Personally, I think you're asking the wrong question. And I mean women. Dont get married for any reason, until you are a graduate or a licensed pro. Woman are dream killers.

Dude! Been married many years; raised a family. Absolutely, positively, loved it....still do.

'Course, ya gotta find a gal with the right aptitude.


 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
Very good question. The very short answer is a resounding, NO. But, of course there's more to it than that.
I have a Bachelor's and a Master's degree, but it was required for my license to work in the health care field.

I'm not very old (30s) and college is not what it used to be. You will definitely be indoctrinated by neomarxist, intersectional cult propaganda and turned into a communist, losing your work ethic and integrity, instead leaving with a victim complex, while also being taught to hate yourself because you're "privileged." Not to mention, also losing you're critical thinking skills, ability to reason, use logic, and even your sense of reality. That's almost all college is good for anymore. Many of these indoctrination classes are mandatory! There's no getting out of them even if you are trying to be an engineer or something and it has no relation whatsoever.

There are a few things you need to ask yourself to find out in order to decide to go to college:

#1: Pick a job you want, not a "major." The few good reasons to go to college are STEM fields, such as being an engineer or scientist of some kind. To be a lawyer. To be a doctor or work in the health care field like myself. Something where you absolutely have to go to college to do the job. In college, you are trading 4 or 5 years of your life, instead of real world experience you could be gaining, that is much more valuable than a college degree. Plus, you're making money, rather than spending it.

#2: Who's paying for it? If mommy and daddy are paying for it or you have some kind of college fund, that is one thing, but taking out a bunch of loans in a huge mistake. College was way cheaper for baby boomers and they could work part time and pay for their own college. Now, college is so expensive, that's an impossibility.

#3: Would you do it for the right reasons? My advice is to not listen to the kind of people who say things like, "college was the best years of my life." It's one thing if you are in a fraternity, networking with people, and making connections that will help you down the road. But, a huge mistake many kids make is partying all the time, wasting money, and potentially turning into degenerates for the rest of their lives.

It's hard to do when you're young and don't know anything, but it's important to find a passion and then a profession that relates to that passion, and then get your foot in the door and build your experience. A person with no college degree, but 4 years of experience is more valuable than a person with a college degree, but no experience.

Just my 2 cents from someone who unfortunately had to go to college for what felt like a lifetime.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Very good question. The very short answer is a resounding, NO. But, of course there's more to it than that.
I have a Bachelor's and a Master's degree, but it was required for my license to work in the health care field.

I'm not very old (30s) and college is not what it used to be. You will definitely be indoctrinated by neomarxist, intersectional cult propaganda and turned into a communist, losing your work ethic and integrity, instead leaving with a victim complex, while also being taught to hate yourself because you're "privileged." Not to mention, also losing you're critical thinking skills, ability to reason, use logic, and even your sense of reality. That's almost all college is good for anymore. Many of these indoctrination classes are mandatory! There's no getting out of them even if you are trying to be an engineer or something and it has no relation whatsoever.

There are a few things you need to ask yourself to find out in order to decide to go to college:

#1: Pick a job you want, not a "major." The few good reasons to go to college are STEM fields, such as being an engineer or scientist of some kind. To be a lawyer. To be a doctor or work in the health care field like myself. Something where you absolutely have to go to college to do the job. In college, you are trading 4 or 5 years of your life, instead of real world experience you could be gaining, that is much more valuable than a college degree. Plus, you're making money, rather than spending it.

#2: Who's paying for it? If mommy and daddy are paying for it or you have some kind of college fund, that is one thing, but taking out a bunch of loans in a huge mistake. College was way cheaper for baby boomers and they could work part time and pay for their own college. Now, college is so expensive, that's an impossibility.

#3: Would you do it for the right reasons? My advice is to not listen to the kind of people who say things like, "college was the best years of my life." It's one thing if you are in a fraternity, networking with people, and making connections that will help you down the road. But, a huge mistake many kids make is partying all the time, wasting money, and potentially turning into degenerates for the rest of their lives.

It's hard to do when you're young and don't know anything, but it's important to find a passion and then a profession that relates to that passion, and then get your foot in the door and build your experience. A person with no college degree, but 4 years of experience is more valuable than a person with a college degree, but no experience.

Just my 2 cents from someone who unfortunately had to go to college for what felt like a lifetime.
Ahh which my parents would understand that. Not easy to convince them when you have a sister thats been in college for like 6+ years getting her Ph.D. (but lacks common sense aka "street smarts"):rofl: A company would rather higher someone with more experience in the filed then someone fresh out of college with 0 experience. Unfortunately, I am paying for school (community college). I can't get financial aid because my parents make too much?
 

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You are presented with an option that a great many ignore, that is to take what you would like to do most and pursue it, I hope it isn't selling cars though. Go to university or other place of higher learning as part of your pursuit. People who have the happiest lives found what they loved and pursued it fearlessly. If money is your goal be a lawyer but you may hate yourself for it.
 

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I can personally attest that you can do a four year degree and still wind up selling cars!
If you love your job keep at it, there is plenty of money in car sales.
Personally I love cars and really enjoyed talking about and driving new cars every day, and closing deals.
But I didn***8217;t like every customer coming in assuming I***8217;m a slippery liar before I***8217;ve said a word.
And I didn***8217;t like every boss literally insisting I be more of a c****!! As if that is a desirable trait in an employee!
It***8217;s not for everyone, and if you***8217;re asking the question you***8217;re probably over it too?
You can have a successful career with or without a degree.
A positive attitude and loving what you do every day, will end up being a successful career more often than not.
At your age (20 years ago) I thought I had to have a business degree to be successful, but I didn***8217;t have any specific plan, so after graduating I meandered through a lot of different jobs and only recently got into a decent job in my field.
If I had my time again I would pick a trade I enjoy such as a mechanic or landscaping, and work up to running a successful self employed business.
Doing it that way you start making money earlier, and your success relies on yourself.
Going the degree route you start making money later and your success relies on landing a good job in the right field, and you***8217;ll always be relying on getting promotions and climbing the ladder to get ahead. Maybe a safer bet in the end but it can be a much longer game!
 

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Nick's Toys
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My non-American perspective is that you should learn a trade and if you have the cash and time do a degree afterward.
My plumber charges more than my Lawyer.
I charge more for a Dyno run than my doc for an Ekg.
Should the world enter another depression, a mechanic will be worth more than another MBA gradute in an academic-only field.

When I say trade, then I mean it in the german sense, where you finish off by getting your Meister degree.
 

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I haven't read all of the posts, so I may be echoing others. I told my own kids, and I plan to tell my grandkids, that there are two parts of a college degree: training and general education. Don't neglect either. Training should be for a career doing something that you care about, and don't answer that you care only about money. There are careers where I could have made more money than the one I chose if I did them well, but I didn't care about those jobs, so that I wouldn't have done them well. General education includes learning how to write and about language so that you can communicate better; learning about history so that you can understand the present and have some idea about the future; learning about religion and philosophy so that you can become a better person; and learning about art, music, and drama, so that you can enjoy life more fully.

If that doesn't make more education appealing, consider this: only one of my great grandparents had more than an 8th grade education. Everyone in my generation has had at least a college degree. The world is getting more complicated and more technical. You will have a better place in it with more education.
 

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Lots of good advice and food for thought for you. Here are a few more points to think about:

- Don't get too caught up in "what the economy" will be like in 3-5 years. Yes absolutely try to position yourself in an industry that will be here in the future but that can be a lot easier said than done. Changing careers/jobs during your life can and does happen.
- Sounds like you have good sales skills and selling cars and even better real estate, you don't need a degree to be successful doing either one.
- You need to have a skill no matter what! That can be sales, certified technician, real estate license, Coast Guard license, mechanic, something to make a decent living.
- All that being said having a 4 year degree is better than not having one. By how much will depend on what you make of it and also what the degree is in. For example a degree in English you are going to have to be VERY good to make a career writing. A degree in Computer Science even if you are just average you will always be able to find a job and make good money.

Best of Luck!
 

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I was 27 when I graduated with a BS in Accounting and Business and had a 10 year old son too! I went to Community College at night for over 3 years and got an Associate of Arts degree. Then went to a local 4 year college for another 3 years part time and full time when I could. I graduated Summa Cum Laude. I went to work in the energy industry and was able to retire at the age of 46. It was all hard work, studied my ass off and worked part time and full time while in college and being a Mom.
Get a degree....don’t be stupid.
Amen!...I followed the same track...CC is from my personal experience the way to do lower division work. I had knowledgeable and seasoned pros who had left industry to teach chemistry and physics. They were there because they were passionate about science and teaching it! Imparted both knowledge and understanding why you needed to learn it...when I transferred to Cal, not knowing anyone, I stayed in a dorm for one year...with mostly freshmen...who were the brightest and best in HS struggling with Chemistry...Huge lectures taught by profs who viewed them as "intrusions on my research" and labs run by grad students more interested in their thesis than answering ??'s. Plus CC gives you a chance to take "broadening" courses at a much lower expense...I spent 3 years taking full loads (15-17 units/semester) taking English and Econ with the English and Econ majors, some History (back in the day when it was valued) . I ended up running a large operation, writing and presenting technical papers and product literature...so all those "non tech" courses came in handy. Spent 3+ years at night taking Bus courses at CSU-LA down the road from work..company paid tuition, then went back up north for another 1 1/2 years....so all told 10 years of study after HS....Not "Privilege", but opportunity..that in the US, anyone can seize if they want to put in the effort and sacrifice present gratification to save $$$'s and invest them in their future! Education is one thing that stays with you all your life and pays you back big time!:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

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Ahh which my parents would understand that. Not easy to convince them when you have a sister thats been in college for like 6+ years getting her Ph.D. (but lacks common sense aka "street smarts"):rofl: A company would rather higher someone with more experience in the filed then someone fresh out of college with 0 experience. Unfortunately, I am paying for school (community college). I can't get financial aid because my parents make too much?[/QUOTE

I was in the same situation, my parents we're borderline middle class...today probably be on govt assistance of some kind, given the upper income limits of some of the programs. Staying at home, driving a "clunker"...which BTW made me become a fairly high level DIY wrench (lots of fun later on... a drudge while holding a job and going to CC full time) while at CC taking full unit loads every semester.
Nowadays...kids take 6 years to barely (at least some) get a bachelors degree. All they while living like they already "have it made"...Starbucks 2X a day (Just think about what that adds up to over 6 years $10K+ on your student loans...for coffee!), eating out several times a week, hanging out in bars on weekend nights etc, etc...Trips to exotic places during breaks, no summer job...You have to "recover" from all the hard work during the school year.
However, if you spend money like it's "not yours to spend"...stay in apartments without "amenities" and with "roomies", learn to cook...don't hang out in bars..except for a pitcher of beer after midterms and finals.

To recap: Attend CC first, live like a "starving student", not a "mid career professional" in your student years.
Follow that path or something close to it, and you can still get a good education without having loans that look like the "National Debt"! :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

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At San Jose State College ***8216;66-***8216;68 a Togo***8217;s foot-long cost 79¢ food for a day. A gallon of red wine cost $1.79 for a week. I alternated making french onion soup or spaghetti weekly for starving classmates.

Years later my ship picked up a squad of enlisted spooks - Communications Technicians. It was a recreation relief for having gotten tired of chess and poker with the same suckers for months at a time. One was an Aleut that had lived just down the block from me while we were both at SJSC.
 

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Stay in school and get a degree. I have 4 boys, college is a non negotiable. My 25 yr old just finished law school, my 18 year old is going medical and 16 and 14 yr old will go as well into what ever fields interest them.

It makes no difference if you choose to work in the field that your degree is in. What matter's is that you showed the ball sack to finish it. A degree does not mean that you will make more money or that you're better than someone without it but its an easy tie breaker. If I want to hire someone and all things are equal, the person with a degree will get the job over the one without. Military service would beat it all but you didn't mention that as an option.

I find most of the people who state you dont need a degree are the ones who don't have one. Parents who say their kids don't need a degree are the parents who can't afford to put their kids thru school. I am 52 yrs old and still working on my masters because I choose not to finish my degree as a kid. I saw good money and figured why should I give it up. I own my company and make a great living but education is something that no one can ever take away from you. 4 years now will cost you 40 yrs later.

Pick a career that you love, not one for your parents. There is nothing wrong with having a degree and selling cars.

Tim
 

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You have your answer here - and anyone else deciding who is lurking with the same question.

As already pointed out, I see in your responses a focus on 3-4 years time. Your working like is another 40 years or so. That's twice as long as you've already lived. You don't have the time horizon to really understand how much is going to change over that time.

Think of your life trajectory as the cannonball fired from a cannon. The speed of the cannonball is the effort you put in. The angle of the cannon is the usefulness of the things you choose to specialize in. Specialize in nothing and you can charge through your 20's with a lot of effort, but you have no 'angle' and will land short when the 'hot' skill you have becomes less hot because they are ultimately easy to master. I would put car sales in this bucket. Fun when you're young, an absolute drag when you're 40 and young guys are coming in and outclassing you with their effort and energy. Get too specialized in an esoteric field like the dogma arts nonsense like gender studies and you'll shoot up and come straight back down - and be broke and bitter with the world. Spend time specializing in a durable field and put a lot of effort in and you'll shoot a long, long way. What you want to find when you're 40 is that the previous 20 years of working life have become valuable experience for you to mentor, manage and plan the work for other young people coming into the field. You'll have to top up that knowledge with learning along the way. You can be a business owner in this space, or you can be a manager for a larger company - but either way you'll need consistent experience over time in a skill that is durable. Durable as in valuable and not easy to pick up. You'll want to be working with people & companies who value their time more than their money - so they'll pay handsomely for solutions that take problems away. If you look around any industry and there's no old people in it think carefully because life is long and youth is short.

When I was in college I was in the middle of hating it and just wanted to drop out and paint cars. I hung around a panel shop working on my own car and loved seeing them come out of the booth shiny. A 30 minute discussion with the painter managed to cure me of that. I nearly flunked out as they say. But I pulled it together, graduated, managed to get a job after 12 months of menial jobs during a recession, went on to do further study and topped the class. I can still go and hang out in paint booths if I want but economic forces are not keeping me there.

Never stop learning and try and pick up a second or third discipline which you can combine with your first. Car selling while in college combined with an economics/finance degree might land you as someone who negotiates fleet sales and financing. Mechanical engineering combined with software will put you into the fast growing area of robotics. Always add public speaking to anything and come out on top.
 

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Higher education and I didn't mix well. I tried a 4 year school, was out after the first 2 semester. Then I tried a 2 yr school, didn't work. Finally I did a 7 or 8 month course in programming & got a piece of paper which said I could write code. Then it was all OJT training. Worked out well for me. :)
 

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Going to College

Absolutely, you should go, college is not about making money like you said you could easily get rich selling cars, its about learning and broadening your view of the world, of understanding how it all fits together, there have been six mass extinctions in the 4 billion years of earth's existence, and we already know that human beings while on top of the food chain now could easily be gone in an instant, but education allows one to understand and enjoy their 80 years of life, so go and take as long as you like to finish, sells cars get rich and take a few classes a year.
 
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