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If you had to ask this question, you have not set goals that are important to you. With goals set and recognizing the intensity and skills to achieve them, the answer will present itself to you. I suggest you continue selling cars for a couple years. If you are then satisfied with your status in life, don't waste your money. If you are not satisfied where you are, it will not be to late to improve your self. It took me nineteen years after graduating High school to get my BS and MBA. Today, I'm a wealthy retiree living a good life.
 

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E93 335i, somewhat mod <> Fog City, CA
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Higher education and I didn't mix well. I tried a 4 year school, was out after the first 2 semester. Then I tried a 2 yr school, didn't work. Finally I did a 7 or 8 month course in programming & got a piece of paper which said I could write code. Then it was all OJT training. Worked out well for me. :)

Programming....best chess game around


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My non-American perspective is that you should learn a trade and if you have the cash and time do a degree afterward.
My plumber charges more than my Lawyer.
I charge more for a Dyno run than my doc for an Ekg.
Should the world enter another depression, a mechanic will be worth more than another MBA gradute in an academic-only field.

When I say trade, then I mean it in the german sense, where you finish off by getting your Meister degree.
You can own a house and have a family with that approach. Not everyone is suited for college. An enterprising person can own businesses or rental properties or both.
 

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Stay in school and get a degree. I have 4 boys, college is a non negotiable. My 25 yr old just finished law school, my 18 year old is going medical and 16 and 14 yr old will go as well into what ever fields interest them.

It makes no difference if you choose to work in the field that your degree is in. What matter's is that you showed the ball sack to finish it. A degree does not mean that you will make more money or that you're better than someone without it but its an easy tie breaker. If I want to hire someone and all things are equal, the person with a degree will get the job over the one without. Military service would beat it all but you didn't mention that as an option.

I find most of the people who state you dont need a degree are the ones who don't have one. Parents who say their kids don't need a degree are the parents who can't afford to put their kids thru school. I am 52 yrs old and still working on my masters because I choose not to finish my degree as a kid. I saw good money and figured why should I give it up. I own my company and make a great living but education is something that no one can ever take away from you. 4 years now will cost you 40 yrs later.

Pick a career that you love, not one for your parents. There is nothing wrong with having a degree and selling cars.

Tim
Much wisdom there is to contemplate here. I got smitten by Fortran in the fall of 1970 and I found a good time line. Later in my career, I found out I was good at project management and enjoyed it. I didn't have any idea how lucrative systems engineering and risk management would become. I didn't go to grad school because I liked 69 Vettes too much.
 

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Barely in control
Monaco 2008 328Xi coupe
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At San Jose State College '66-'68 a Togo's foot-long cost 79¢ food for a day. A gallon of red wine cost $1.79 for a week. I alternated making french onion soup or spaghetti weekly for starving classmates.

Years later my ship picked up a squad of enlisted spooks - Communications Technicians. It was a recreation relief for having gotten tired of chess and poker with the same suckers for months at a time. One was an Aleut that had lived just down the block from me while we were both at SJSC.
"One was an Aleut that had lived just down the block from me while we were both at SJSC."

Is that a correctional facility?

Sorry I couldn't help myself.
 

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Lots of smart people on this forum with tons of great life experiences. I recommend getting a meaningful four year degree. But you don't have to know the ending of the story at the begining. You just have to begin.

I started school wanting to be an engineer then got destroyed by high level science. But I realized that school was fun and I was surrounded by opportunities. I got my BA in accounting in 1984. Grades weren't perfect, the economy sucked and I didn't want to be a CPA so I took a promotion at the job I held in school, became manager of a Pizza Hut. Found I was good at it and really like dealing with different folks daily, customers and staff.

About 1.5 years into that, my regional vp comes to the restaurant for a surprise visit. I was in my hometown of Charlottesville and his daughter was at UVA (I went JMU). So he's killing some time by making sure things are running right. Back then before delivery, the Hut was the pizza king. Anyway, he spends a couple of hours following me around and decides he likes the cut of my jib. So he asks me what I want to do with my career and I say that I need to get a return on the degree I was still paying loans for. He makes a couple of calls, gets me an interview at the region office and bam, I land my first role in corporate accounting. That would have never happened if I hadn't had my degree at that moment. From there I moved through different companies and positions; senior audit, controller, pricing and finally director of finance and decision support, which is where I wanted to be for a long while. Now I enjoy engineering business decisions so in a way I get what I wanted way back when.

Back to the point. You never know who or what will cross your path, but surrounding yourself with achievers is generally a good idea. For me, that was college but it could easily have been the military or some other path. Not to mention that I got away from mom and dad, learned to live and pay for things on my own. With that, hard work, preparation (as required for good luck) and doing your best in any situation will most often lead you to the right place.

My recommendation is get a degree, learn some stuff and along the way you will figure out who and what you want to be in the long run. That's what worked for me. Best of luck young man.
 

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1 of my best classes was typing, in high school.
Aside from being the only guy in a room full of girls. :)
I use that skill all day, every day, and no, I'm not talking about using 2 thumbs on a telephone.

I went to CC for 2 years right after HS; I knew I wanted the CompSci path, but my HS grades were quite poor.
Working full time, school full time, after getting the Associates degree, I wasn't sure what I wanted.
Of course, I was about 19 at the time, who knows anything at that point?

So I got a job a car dealership, in the parts department.
Worked there for a year, and carried 5 cars up 2 flights of stairs, 1 piece at a time.
The point of that job was to discover the value of an education.

Started at Pitt, and discovered the absolute load of crap that passed for "higher education".
Whiney TAs "teaching" the classes, professors you see on the first day of class, before they dumped everything on the TA & disappeared.
"Students" who were there to party on someone else's dime.
I was working full-time in TV & several years older than the freshmen I was in classes with; Pitt didn't think much of my AS degree from the local CC, so I was almost starting over again.

In my current position, the (only?) useful knowledge from school came from programming, and I actually learned it in HS.
Writing a functional program requires you to analyze a "problem", and anticipate and prepare for EVERY possible outcome.
Something as easy as a yes/no question will be answered by SOME idiot with "yellow" or "7".
Prepare for all eventualities, handle the exceptions.

My work requires me to herd cats, anticipate things no one else even thinks about, have solutions in hand for those off-the-wall possibilities, periodically blow sunshine up skirts, juggle personalities, meet/exceed (sometimes unrealistic) expectations, and generally have the time of my life doing it.
I learned exactly none of that in college.

I suppose my long-winded point is this:
Do what you love; it's ok if that changes over the next 40 years or so.
Don't do things "ok", do them to the best of your ability.
Accept challenges and kick their asses.

Alternatively, you can use the washing machine gnome path to success:
1. steal socks
2. ??
3. profit!

Let me know if you figure out step 2.
 

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1 of my best classes was typing, in high school.
Aside from being the only guy in a room full of girls. :)
I use that skill all day, every day, and no, I'm not talking about using 2 thumbs on a telephone.

I went to CC for 2 years right after HS; I knew I wanted the CompSci path, but my HS grades were quite poor.
Working full time, school full time, after getting the Associates degree, I wasn't sure what I wanted.
Of course, I was about 19 at the time, who knows anything at that point?

So I got a job a car dealership, in the parts department.
Worked there for a year, and carried 5 cars up 2 flights of stairs, 1 piece at a time.
The point of that job was to discover the value of an education.

Started at Pitt, and discovered the absolute load of crap that passed for "higher education".
Whiney TAs "teaching" the classes, professors you see on the first day of class, before they dumped everything on the TA & disappeared.
"Students" who were there to party on someone else's dime.
I was working full-time in TV & several years older than the freshmen I was in classes with; Pitt didn't think much of my AS degree from the local CC, so I was almost starting over again.

In my current position, the (only?) useful knowledge from school came from programming, and I actually learned it in HS.
Writing a functional program requires you to analyze a "problem", and anticipate and prepare for EVERY possible outcome.
Something as easy as a yes/no question will be answered by SOME idiot with "yellow" or "7".
Prepare for all eventualities, handle the exceptions.

My work requires me to herd cats, anticipate things no one else even thinks about, have solutions in hand for those off-the-wall possibilities, periodically blow sunshine up skirts, juggle personalities, meet/exceed (sometimes unrealistic) expectations, and generally have the time of my life doing it.
I learned exactly none of that in college.

I suppose my long-winded point is this:
Do what you love; it's ok if that changes over the next 40 years or so.
Don't do things "ok", do them to the best of your ability.
Accept challenges and kick their asses.

Alternatively, you can use the washing machine gnome path to success:
1. steal socks
2. ??
3. profit!

Let me know if you figure out step 2.

I always find interesting when students start to advise what is useful and what is not when it comes to education. That long list of peer reviewed work that they come with screams credibility.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Dude! . The Cathedral of Learning?





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yep.
I LOVED that building.
There were interior balconies that were really cool, and extremely quiet places to study between classes.
You can see 2 of them on the near left of the picture.
In real life, they weren't so brightly lit, so they sort of faded into the background.
The stone staircases were smooth as glass & completely treacherous when wet, worn by countless passing feet, which is just amazing on its own.
 

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E93 335i, somewhat mod <> Fog City, CA
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yep.
I LOVED that building.
There were interior balconies that were really cool, and extremely quiet places to study between classes.
You can see 2 of them on the near left of the picture.
In real life, they weren't so brightly lit, so they sort of faded into the background.
The stone staircases were smooth as glass & completely treacherous when wet, worn by countless passing feet, which is just amazing on its own.

I'm hip - a high school bud graduated there, degree in Philosophy.

Useless in the business world but he had imagination....that was useful....
 

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I know this isn't' really a BMW or automotive-related question, but I am 22 years old currently working in the automotive industry (selling cars). I did attend community college for 1.5 years and I am currently taking a "Break" from school. With what's going on, I am not sure if a college education really is worth all that money, effort, or stress. I was planning on transferring over to a 4-year university and getting a bachelor's degree in operation and information management. But, I am not too confident on how the job market will look in 3 years or how the economy will be because of the pandemic. I am kind of stuck between keeping my sales job and potentially moving into a management position after a few years or quitting, going back to school, and risk not getting a job after graduating. :dunno:
statistically speaking college grads earn more than non-college grads--that is, unless you created something in your basement that everyone has to have and use. No one says you have to spend big $$ to go to a fancy ivy league. Fancy $$ schools may get you an interview, but it doesn't guarantee you anything except a big bill. I was brainwashed into believing that my fancy college would open doors, and after 28 years I have yet to find any truth to that common misconception. The in demand fields currently are not going to change over the next three years. instead of full time, do evening classes or online classes while working full time. Lots of folks do it. What's the saying? What do you call a doctor who graduated with C's from a public school vs a doctor who graduated top class from harvard? doctor. College only matters in lieu of work experience or vice versa and relegates to a checkbox after your first job upon graduating.
 

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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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OK! Ya'll notice? Even in a forum for what's arguably a teenager's first buy, just about everyone sports a mortar board.
The forum BF has a half-million+ members and 200 responses in this thread. All self-selected, the most fundamental corruption of a survey.

Mortarboards are awarded to HS graduates.
 
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