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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everybody.

I need to replace idle control valve and MAF sensor on my car and before i do that i just wanted to check with you guys how much time does it take to replace ICV and MAF sensor. Auto shop where i'm planning to drop my car told me it's gonna take about 3-4 hours and they charge 90$/hr.

Should I drop the car at this auto shop or shop for another place.


Thanks.
 

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As far as the MAF goes, it is literally on top of the engine bay, no digging around or anything. Will take all of 2 minutes to unplug and replace. Do it yourself and save urself an hour of BS. The easiest thing in the world. Thats just a waste of money. I'll take a pic of mine after work if you want. But it is seriously easy as hell. Dont pay for it. Just buy the part and do it yourself. The ICV is a little more complicated but dunno how much they should charge.
 

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The MAF is minutes to do, as moiz21 pointed out.

The ICV doesn't take much longer. I removed it during an oil separator job. Took less than an hour to get to the ICV, which I removed to clean and install a new gasket thingy. Look at the DIYs in the wiki so you can see the steps involved. Biggest PITA will be the upside down hose clamp on the little tube off the lower intake boot. Not sure if you can wiggle the ICV out without having to remove the lower intake boot itself, but if you're to that point you may want to put on a new boot because they're often cracked.

Even throwing in extra time for inducting the car into the shop, putting protective paper in the footwell, etc., 3-4 hours seems high to me.

I'm sure other folks can chime in who have access to repair time standards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I'll search for DIY on how to replace them. I never did any work on any cars... except air filter so i'm kinda scared to do it myself. But I guess there is always time to learn :)
 

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Just got home from work. Give me a few minutes and I'll take a pic of the MAF and point out how to remove it. You'll b surprised how easy it is.
 

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Hi everybody.

I need to replace idle control valve and MAF sensor on my car and before i do that i just wanted to check with you guys how much time does it take to replace ICV and MAF sensor. Auto shop where i'm planning to drop my car told me it's gonna take about 3-4 hours and they charge 90$/hr.

Should I drop the car at this auto shop or shop for another place.

Thanks.
Try bimrs.org to see if there is a shop near you that is a little more realistic. Even 2 hrs is a little excessive in my opinion based on what I see on my car, but as mentioned, they have to get the car in ect. I like to give my mechanic slight leeway, but some guys want to hit a home run.
 

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Thanks guys. I'll search for DIY on how to replace them. I never did any work on any cars... except air filter so i'm kinda scared to do it myself. But I guess there is always time to learn :)
These are worthwhile DIYs, save the money. Are you sure you need to replace them? What is your problem that you're having? The parts are spendy ($125 for ICV, $250 for MAF), and others, myself included, have had success just cleaning them. Make sure you actually need to replace them.

My suggestion is to DIY and try cleaning the existing parts first. Have the spare parts on-hand in case you need to replace them, but try cleaning the existing parts first, so you can return the new parts if you don't need them. Only tools you might need that you may not have in your garage is a torx set and a small 6mm wrench (or a flexible hose clamp driver).

Follow this DIY for cleaning your ICV:
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=248979

Only alteration from that DIY for your job will be to remove the MAF sensor (this is the little hard plastic "sleeve" connecting your air box and the rubber upper air intake boot on the right side of your engine -- you'll see a wiring harness plugged into the top of it, it's immediately to the right of your red dipstick). It might be easier to remove your air box to do this. Remove the two 10mm bolts on the right side of the air box. Unplug the wiring harness that is attached to the MAF. Loosen the hose clamp holding the MAF and slide the rubber boot off the MAF. You should be able to lift the airbox out, shifting toward the rear of the car and swinging it up. Once it's out, you can buckle the clips holding the MAF sensor to the air box and take it out. It is very fragile, so be careful not to break it, never touch the wires on the inside of it with anything. Buy some CRC mass air flow sensor cleaner, and follow the instructions on it. While your MAF is set in a safe, clean place drying, proceed with that DIY in the link above.

Two tips for the ICV -- 1) have a tiny 6 mm wrench or flexible hose clamp driver for the hose clamp between the lower air intake boot and the ICV; it's a tight space to work in and can take some time, but it's doable 2) when you are replacing it, give the ICV a firm push to make sure it pops into place. I did this once and did not get my ICV all the way in, and it did not idle right and I smelled gas in my garage. I had to take everything apart, make sure it was pressed into place, and it was better after that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Try bimrs.org to see if there is a shop near you that is a little more realistic. Even 2 hrs is a little excessive in my opinion based on what I see on my car, but as mentioned, they have to get the car in ect. I like to give my mechanic slight leeway, but some guys want to hit a home run.
That's where i found this shop (on bimrs.org) the only one on that web site. I guess i'll try to do it myself or look for other places.

Thanks.
 

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Here ya go. Just follow the steps in the pics I edited for ya. Once you follow the directions you should be able to wiggle the MAF loose. I didnt even have to take the airbox off. Just be gentle with ur movements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
These are worthwhile DIYs, save the money. Are you sure you need to replace them? What is your problem that you're having? The parts are spendy ($125 for ICV, $250 for MAF), and others, myself included, have had success just cleaning them. Make sure you actually need to replace them.

My suggestion is to DIY and try cleaning the existing parts first. Have the spare parts on-hand in case you need to replace them, but try cleaning the existing parts first, so you can return the new parts if you don't need them. Only tools you might need that you may not have in your garage is a torx set and a small 6mm wrench (or a flexible hose clamp driver).

Follow this DIY for cleaning your ICV:
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=248979

Only alteration from that DIY for your job will be to remove the MAF sensor (this is the little hard plastic "sleeve" connecting your air box and the rubber upper air intake boot on the right side of your engine -- you'll see a wiring harness plugged into the top of it, it's immediately to the right of your red dipstick). It might be easier to remove your air box to do this. Remove the two 10mm bolts on the right side of the air box. Unplug the wiring harness that is attached to the MAF. Loosen the hose clamp holding the MAF and slide the rubber boot off the MAF. You should be able to lift the airbox out, shifting toward the rear of the car and swinging it up. Once it's out, you can buckle the clips holding the MAF sensor to the air box and take it out. It is very fragile, so be careful not to break it, never touch the wires on the inside of it with anything. Buy some CRC mass air flow sensor cleaner, and follow the instructions on it. While your MAF is set in a safe, clean place drying, proceed with that DIY in the link above.

Two tips for the ICV -- 1) have a tiny 6 mm wrench or flexible hose clamp driver for the hose clamp between the lower air intake boot and the ICV; it's a tight space to work in and can take some time, but it's doable 2) when you are replacing it, give the ICV a firm push to make sure it pops into place. I did this once and did not get my ICV all the way in, and it did not idle right and I smelled gas in my garage. I had to take everything apart, make sure it was pressed into place, and it was better after that.
I had check engine light on three times already.. first time it was about 6 months ago..then last week it happened again and few days ago. Every time code was for ICV but last time codes were for ICV and MAF. So i probably gonna replace ICV since its not that expensive and clean MAF.

Thanks a lot for info u provided. :thumbup:
 

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No problem. Did mine and my brothers in under 5 minutes. And before this car, I never touched a car before in my life. Started doing the work myself when I bought my 323i and found out how expensive taking it to a shop could get hehe. The work is never as hard as it seems honestly.
 

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No problem. Did mine and my brothers in under 5 minutes. And before this car, I never touched a car before in my life. Started doing the work myself when I bought my 323i and found out how expensive taking it to a shop could get hehe. The work is never as hard as it seems honestly.
Same experience here. When I got the stealership's $700 estimate for front brakes, and realized I could get the parts for about $170 (with dustless pads!) and do it myself in an afternoon, I wondered why on earth I would pay someone $700 to do this.
 

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I had check engine light on three times already.. first time it was about 6 months ago..then last week it happened again and few days ago. Every time code was for ICV but last time codes were for ICV and MAF. So i probably gonna replace ICV since its not that expensive and clean MAF.

Thanks a lot for info u provided. :thumbup:
Go easy on cleaning that MAF, and only use a product specifically designed for that. The parts in the MAF are quite fragile. You can do it, but just go easy on it.
 
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