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Extended Euro Delivery
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Holy crap!
 

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Shocking and sad. 41 years old. His daughter, age 13 too.

There's this feeling of cosmic "unfairness"... he gave us all those years of entertainment and enjoyment, and now in his retirement he was supposed to enjoy the fruits of his efforts (and our adoration). Cut short.




A friend who is a venture capitalist got into helicopters. Bought one. Joined a national pilot association. They had an annual fly in, so he was going for every summer- a real adventure to hop-skip to a midwest/mountain location. It was at his second annual meeting, when they put up an "In Memoriam" slide with names, that he realized this was the guys that had died SINCE THE LAST ANNUAL MEETING.

He sold his chopper. Flies planes now.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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... He sold his chopper. Flies planes now.
Random parts flying in concert directed by an A&P that’s not even there.

Ya ought’a see the censorship / First Amendment battles going on just now in public forums (fora).
 

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That's not what the article said. The company was not allowed to fly IFR. However, the pilot was IRF-rated. There were no recorders on the helicopter. So, it's possible that they'll never really know what happened. The rapid descent and high horizontal speed at impact raises the possibility of a mechanical failure as the underlying cause.

My dad was a flight engineer on large transport aircraft, an engine mechanic, and a private pilot back in the 1950's. He only really gave me two pieces of advice about life in general:

1. As you go though life, whatever may be your goal, keep you eye on the donut and not on the hole.

2. Stay as far away from helicopters as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's not what the article said. The company was not allowed to fly IFR. However, the pilot was IRF-rated. There were no recorders on the helicopter. So, it's possible that they'll never really know what happened. The rapid descent and high horizontal speed at impact raises the possibility of a mechanical failure as the underlying cause.

My dad was a flight engineer on large transport aircraft, an engine mechanic, and a private pilot back in the 1950's. He only really gave me two pieces of advice about life in general:

1. As you go though life, whatever may be your goal, keep you eye on the donut and not on the hole.

2. Stay as far away from helicopters as possible.
good advise :thumbup:
coworkers wife give him bday present - 1 hr fly with an instructor from Long Beach Airport on a helicopter - he never goes.
 

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good advise :thumbup:
coworkers wife give him bday present - 1 hr fly with an instructor from Long Beach Airport on a helicopter - he never goes.
I disobeyed that advice twice: a concession helicopter ride at the US GP in Watkins Glen back in the late 1970's ($8), and a business trip to one of the Channel Islands off of California back in the 1990's. Plan A was to rent a boat for the 50 mile ride, but the seas were too high for the boat.
 

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Extended Euro Delivery
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I took the Maverick night helicopter tour of Vegas when I was there. I never felt comfortable in that thing, but the wife wanted to do it.
 

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A Blue Hawaiian helicopter flight around the island of Maui provided me with one of the most spectacular views I've ever seen, and I'm glad I did it.

It's astonishing to me that people who think nothing of driving their cars every day on busy roads surrounded by drivers of all levels of experience get weak-kneed at the thought of flying in a helicopter.
 

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A Blue Hawaiian helicopter flight around the island of Maui provided me with one of the most spectacular views I've ever seen, and I'm glad I did it.

It's astonishing to me that people who think nothing of driving their cars every day on busy roads surrounded by drivers of all levels of experience get weak-kneed at the thought of flying in a helicopter.
Risk management is a game of probabilities and degrees of potential adverse outcomes. There's a lot of things I do to avoid a premature, violent death:

Don't fly with my bro-in-law, the amateur pilot, in his single-engine airplane he uses to go to his house in the Bahamas.

Don't drive convertibles.

Stay off two-lane highways as much as possible in daylight and dry weather, and stay off them completely at night and during wet weather.

Don't ride a motorcycle.

Don't go to gas station-convenience stores after dark or in bad areas.

I live in a tourist area. One of the tourist activities here is para-sailing, being towed by a boat. One of the para-sailing boat drivers screwed up, and the para-sailor came onto shore and hit the side of a high-rise building... sort of like a scene from a Road Runner cartoon.

A friend of mine is a wide-body captain. He said that he no longer "bids" for trans-oceanic flights. He says where things go to **** over land there are still a lot of options, but over an ocean a lot of those options go away.
 

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Fog disorients the mind of h0m0 sapiens:
Spatial disorientation, spatial unawareness, or "Spatial-D" is the inability to determine one's position, location, and motion relative to their environment.[1] This phenomenon most commonly affects aircraft pilots and underwater divers,[2] but also can be induced in normal conditions***8212;or reproduced in the lab with instruments such as the Barany Chair. In aviation, the term means the inability to correctly interpret aircraft attitude, altitude or airspeed, in relation to the ground or point of reference. This most commonly occurs after a reference point (e.g., the horizon) has been lost. Spatial disorientation, often referred to as 'Spatial-D' by aviators occurs when aircrew's sensory interpretation of their position or motion conflicts with reality. Spatial disorientation is often separated into 3 main categories by mishap investigators:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spatial_disorientation

Some examples:
Vaughan spent much of his last days performing with his band Double Trouble as the opening act for Eric Clapton at Alpine Valley Music Theatre. After the concert concluded, he and three members of Clapton's tour entourage boarded a helicopter that crashed into the side of a nearby ski hill shortly after takeoff.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Stevie_Ray_Vaughan

On June 10, 2019, an Agusta A109E Power crashed onto the Axa Equitable Center on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan, New York City, which sparked a fire on the top of the building. The helicopter involved in the accident, N200BK,[3] was destroyed. The only occupant, the pilot, Tim McCormack, died in the crash.[4] The aircraft was privately owned at the time of the crash.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_New_York_City_helicopter_crash


You would think a luxury helicopter would be fully equipped:

Their Sikorsky S-76B that would whisk them roughly 90 miles from Orange to Ventura Counties, crossing over the heart of Los Angeles, was "like the Cadillac Escalade" of choppers, recalled Kurt Deetz, a former pilot for Bryant. That model is a sleek craft with dual engines equipped with "all the bells and whistles," Deetz said.

Yet it lacked a key safety feature: a terrain awareness and warning system, TAWS, a National Transportation Safety Board official said Tuesday. The NTSB had recommended it be required on large passenger-carrying choppers after a Texas crash in 2004, but that never happened.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/kobe-bryants-ex-pilot-helicopter-215610208.html
 
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