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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Keeping the plastic window in my soft-top looking nice is a real pain. I have a hard time especially with the inside of the window where it is awkward to work around the roll hoops. I am wondering if there is an electric polisher available that might make the work a bit easier.

I remember reading some time ago that DWM uses a pneumatic polisher for this. I don't have a compressor for air tools, so I am hoping there is an electric equivalent.

Anyone seen something that would fit the bill?
 

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I've never seen an electric that would fit the bill. Need to be able to use it one-handed, and weight alone would make it hard to use an electric on the inside of the rear window. I have a small Porter-Cable random orbital palm sander for woodworking, and IMHO it'd be way too heavy and cumbersome to use on the inside of the rear window. Ditto for the Festool R0 125 and any of the Feins I've seen. Easy on/off is also important here. If you think it's no fun cleaning the rear window, imagine cleaning polish splatter off the inside of the ragtop and ragtop compartment. :)

No garage into which to put a small (say 30 gallon, 5HP 110V) air compressor? Once you go air, there are some things for which you'll never go back to electric.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have plenty of room in the garage for a compressor, but I've been holding out on buying one until I can get something pretty good-sized. Would a 30-gallon be big enough? I'd imagine a polisher would use a good bit more air than a ratchet.
 

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I have plenty of room in the garage for a compressor, but I've been holding out on buying one until I can get something pretty good-sized. Would a 30-gallon be big enough? I'd imagine a polisher would use a good bit more air than a ratchet.
I've gotten by just fine with a 30 gallon 5.5 HP oil-free for a long while. It runs a lot when I'm using the random orbital but it manages to keep up. The only time I've had to wait a little bit for it is when using the die grinder on a pile of parts that needed a lot of work. If I were doing bodywork I'd need a bigger one. My only real complaint about it is that it's loud (all oil-free units are loud), and after 15 years it needs a new regulator (which I haven't yet replaced because I have an in-line regulator that works fine).

The one on my list after I move is the Ingersoll-Rand 2340L5, $1150 from northerntool.com (plus $75 for the start-up kit). Should be the last compressor I buy.
 

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Why would you want to use a polisher on the rear window? A little bit of plastic polish and elbow grease will do the trick in about 5 minutes. I polish mine about once every 2-3 weeks just to keep it nice and clear. The first time may take two or three shots to really clear it up.
 

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Why would you want to use a polisher on the rear window?
Because it's a hell of a lot less work to clean the fog off the inside of the window with a pneumatic random orbital than it is to do it by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Why would you want to use a polisher on the rear window? A little bit of plastic polish and elbow grease will do the trick in about 5 minutes. I polish mine about once every 2-3 weeks just to keep it nice and clear. The first time may take two or three shots to really clear it up.
I have a hard time polishing every area of the window consistently because of the awkward positions I have to do it in. It's not that I can't do it by hand, I just think I might be able to get better results with a polisher.

One of those palm buffers might do the trick, as long as it can be slowed down enough. Like Daniel said, I don't need to be spending all day cleaning 4000RPM splatter off the interior afterwards.
 
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