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Discussion Starter #1
Need some help.

Would you guys pay the extra and get the * marked with the worse fuel and grip ratings or spend less and get better fuel and grip ratings?

Car is a 2014 AH3


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I'd read that leased cars might need to be turned in with the original * tires, but if that's not your case I'd go with the better/cheaper version.
 

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Are you ever going to push the car hard enough and are you actually skilled enough to actually tell the difference between either set of MPS4S vs something like a Continental ExtremeContact Sport which has 99.9% the performance at 80% the price?
 

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Are you ever going to push the car hard enough and are you actually skilled enough to actually tell the difference between either set of MPS4S vs something like a Continental ExtremeContact Sport which has 99.9% the performance at 80% the price?
Best advice I've seen in a while. Continental is my go to tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've still got the Continental SSR fitted but a few people on here and other forums always recommend the PS4S

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I have the previous generation high performance tires: Michelin PSS's and Continental DW's, and on vastly different cars. The big difference I've seen is that the Michelin's wear evenly with pressures closer to what is recommended on the door jamb decals. The Continental DW's need about 15% over the decal pressures to wear evenly, and that affects the ride. This is on two sets of DW's on a Chevy Cobalt (GM Delta platform in Europe). I had the same issue with a set of DWS06's on a Honda Accord.

I start out with ~10% over the decal pressures (measured cold in the early morning), and stick with them for an entire rotation stint. I measure the tread depth patterns with a high-resolution digital tread depth gauge when the tires are new and then during each rotation. I then adjust the pressures for the next rotation stint based on the wear patterns. (I also get an alignment as necessary, based on the wear patterns.)

It's important to stick with a set of pressures for an entire rotation stint, to get a correlation between pressures and measurable wear.
 

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Never ever doubt top performance tire from Michelin:)
Now that I pissed off all that think Nitto or Toyo is same thing, here is why:
I had numerous generations of their Pilot line up.
Last one was PSS. Even at 3/32 they were slicing through water like nothing. I moved to a new house in heavily construction area and one tire picked up 4 nails in 2 months. Still needed minimum weights to balance.
That is beside the fact that they were defying physics.
Other tire I would put in that category is Continental Sportcontact line up, not DW line up.


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I've still got the Continental SSR fitted but a few people on here and other forums always recommend the PS4S

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I think the suggestion is that if you don't track the car, you don't need the 4S. If you do, I would go for the *. If not, I agree with the Continental suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Cheers guys I'll take a look at the Contis

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Never ever doubt top performance tire from Michelin:)
Now that I pissed off all that think Nitto or Toyo is same thing, here is why:
I had numerous generations of their Pilot line up.
Last one was PSS. Even at 3/32 they were slicing through water like nothing. I moved to a new house in heavily construction area and one tire picked up 4 nails in 2 months. Still needed minimum weights to balance.
That is beside the fact that they were defying physics.
Other tire I would put in that category is Continental Sportcontact line up, not DW line up.


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The equivalent to the MPS4S in the Conti lineup is currently the ExtremeContact Sport. It is a vastly superior tire to the old DW it replaced. I am running it on my F31 and my F87. For the performance different the MPS4S gives over the ECS at the price difference of $150 and $300 respectively is not worth it for road only driving. I am on my second set on the F31 with no wear issues as long as I am at stock pressures. Just threw a new set on the F87 after the MPSS that came with the car needed replacing. We will see how they do there.
 

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My question is, what exactly is the difference between the "normal" tire and one with the BMW "*"?

BMW isn't alone in this. I've seen similar versions from Mercedes and Porsche, but couldn't find what might be different. The specs all appear to be the same and the only difference being a character or symbol stamped in the sidewall.
 

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My question is, what exactly is the difference between the "normal" tire and one with the BMW "*"?

BMW isn't alone in this. I've seen similar versions from Mercedes and Porsche, but couldn't find what might be different. The specs all appear to be the same and the only difference being a character or symbol stamped in the sidewall.
The car manufacturers buy enough tires, millions per year, that they can get the tire manufacturers to tweak the design just a little bit. They're usually tight-lipped about exactly what the tweaks are, though. Those OE spec' tires with minor tweaks are usually not available after the car that uses them goes out of production.

There's a Ferrari spec' version of PSS's in my size (245/40-19). But, it has a lower load rating.

Porsche OE spec' tires are often called "N Spec" tires. Michelin still makes N Spec' tires in 205/50-17. That size was for the front tires on old air-cooled 911's, and by coincidence also for my Chevy Cobalt SS. But, they were very expensive and come new with only 8/32" of tread depth instead of the normal 9/32" or 10/32", and have a lower load rating than most 205/50-17's.
 
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