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Over the last few months I've been contemplating getting into auto sales as cars have always been something I've loved and I think I would accel at it.

Just have a few questions.....

I would obviously be starting as a BMW/MB dealer which makes me nervous in the sense that I would be starting off at a high caliber dealership. Am I setting myself up to fail since I won't have any experience and they don't really train new hires. Has anyone else started off with BMW or MB in sales?

Also, I'm a little worried about the turnover rate at a dealership like this. I know that the guy I was helping me to find an M coupe is no longer there and he was only there for a few months before I first met him.

So if anyone out there is a salesman for either of these, could you just give me a little input as to what you think.
 

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Getting hired in a highline store is going to be almost impossible unless you have proven track record in any sales position. Even then you should have some $$$ stashed away because you are not going to make alot of money unless you get lucky selling an m5 or AMG depending on the store. All the top performers that are making money have been in the business for years and these come from referrals. Unfortunately now is not a good time to be a "green pea" especially when you are selling cars near invoice......my advice RUNAWAY!!!!

Just my .02
 

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I see from your address you are in Munich?

Are you talking about selling cars in Munich or in the US? Just curious.
 

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Welcome to the world of big promises and loads of mini-deals. If you haven't done it before and you are thinking that a highline store will just make you money you are wrong, like stated above you will need a referal base to have a steady flow. I did almost 10 years in car sales and my absolute best day was my last:thumbup:
 

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meroglot
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bryce mcgarvey said:
Welcome to the world of big promises and loads of mini-deals. If you haven't done it before and you are thinking that a highline store will just make you money you are wrong, like stated above you will need a referal base to have a steady flow. I did almost 10 years in car sales and my absolute best day was my last:thumbup:
Another (near) 10 year veteran chiming in. It's not a glamorous job. If you like working 65 hours a week, and never seeing your family/friends, look into it. As Bryce said, get used to a lot of mini deals.
 

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The 80/20 rule definitely applies here... 20% make 80% of the money. Although at our store, it is a bit more spread out than that....

These days with leasing though, if you put your in a solid effort (ie. lots of hours as stated above.....) you can see the repeats happening somewhat sooner than say 10 years ago.

Do you have a background with a track record of success in sales? Are you prepared to stay in touch on a regular basis with each and every one of your clients that you do take on. I have seen studies that suggested that 70% of customers would buy from their original salesperson if they were looked after properly in the first place, and if they stayed in touch and were still employed at the same store when they went back.......

The biggest suggestion is to research the store(s) that you are interested in - tenure of the sales force as well as the sales and service managers, their customer satisfaction ratings, the training programs offered - are they inhouse or utilizing proven outside trainers like Joe Verde or Paul Cummings, to name a couple. What are their average gross profits, and how does this translate in the commissions earned? Ask to interview some of their top performers as well as the 90 day green peas. If you run into a store that seems to be a revolving door, chances are that is what it is - not all are like that though.....

Good luck to you :thumbup:
 

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2nd jobs

Will they take part timers at the BMWNA owned dealers or at HQ/Woodcliff Lake?:angel:
 

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I went yesterday to the dealer the salesperson was filing up his time sheet. He worked 62 hours last week. He clock in about 8:30 am and clock out around 8 pm every day with one hour lunch break.
 

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Why fill out a time sheet on a commission job?

I really am confused! The beauty of being a salesman is that you are working for yourself. You do your thing. You get paid by commission. If your thing works, who cares how you did it, you just do it.

The guy filling out the time sheet must not have been pulling his weight or he would have been busy selling cars. He would be better off at a bank job.
 

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meroglot
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Stevarino said:
I really am confused! The beauty of being a salesman is that you are working for yourself. You do your thing. You get paid by commission. If your thing works, who cares how you did it, you just do it.

The guy filling out the time sheet must not have been pulling his weight or he would have been busy selling cars. He would be better off at a bank job.
You have to fill out a time sheet for insurance purposes. You need a way to verify that you were on the job if you get hurt, into an accident, etc.
 

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Ok

But assuming that you are selling cars, can you make your own hours? Can you make your own schedule once you are making your "quota"? Or, are you expected to be at the dealership on a certain schedule?
 

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Stevarino said:
But assuming that you are selling cars, can you make your own hours? Can you make your own schedule once you are making your "quota"? Or, are you expected to be at the dealership on a certain schedule?
Each retailer would set their own policy regarding volume producers and leeway. The main concern from a management perspective would be to ensure that there was adequate floor coverage for anticipated traffic levels, so that potential customers were not left neglected and/or unattended. So a schedule would get set accordingly, and IMO a salesperson would have to be well over quota and sourcing the majority of their business from repeat and referral to set their own hours.

At our store we run a morning, a mid day (noon-7) and afternoon/eve shift. These are the core hours that we require our folks to be in attendance. Obviously our folks work more than these hours, depending on need.

We also have a pretty strong team floor so that they don't have to worry in general about being here all the hours that we are open. If a client comes in when a salesperson is offshift, they will help each other as best as they can......
 

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meroglot
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Stevarino said:
But assuming that you are selling cars, can you make your own hours? Can you make your own schedule once you are making your "quota"? Or, are you expected to be at the dealership on a certain schedule?
If you are not there, you can't sell cars.
 

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I am learning something here

My last sales job was a long time ago. That company could not care less what hours you put in, they only cared about what you sold. That was then and this is now.

I have a BMW interview tomorrow. I really want the job. But. Question. Can I go out and hand out business cards and not be at the dealership or do I have to wait for "walk ins""?
 

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meroglot
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Stevarino said:
I have a BMW interview tomorrow. I really want the job. But. Question. Can I go out and hand out business cards and not be at the dealership or do I have to wait for "walk ins""?
The rules are different everywhere.
 

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Stevarino said:
My last sales job was a long time ago. That company could not care less what hours you put in, they only cared about what you sold. That was then and this is now.

I have a BMW interview tomorrow. I really want the job. But. Question. Can I go out and hand out business cards and not be at the dealership or do I have to wait for "walk ins""?
I think that you should go for it.
Worst case, you are going to learn a lot and may be make some money. Just keep us inform about your new work experience.
I think sale jobs are like the Army. At the very beginning is real hard, but one day you will be a General or something. :thumbup:
 

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Better to burn out than rust out

I think it is more fun, productive, exciting, etc. to go out of the office (dealership) and try to make some sales contacts instead of waiting for people to "walk in".
 

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meroglot
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Stevarino said:
I think it is more fun, productive, exciting, etc. to go out of the office (dealership) and try to make some sales contacts instead of waiting for people to "walk in".

Do you mean on the car lot?
 

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No.

How about going down to the office of the most successful software company or high tech outfit in your city and asking to talk to the CEO? Reason? You need to talk to him about BMW automobiles. It won't work the first 20 times, but it will work on the 21st. time and you will sell some cars.
 

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meroglot
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Stevarino said:
No.

How about going down to the office of the most successful software company or high tech outfit in your city and asking to talk to the CEO? Reason? You need to talk to him about BMW automobiles. It won't work the first 20 times, but it will work on the 21st. time and you will sell some cars.

It will be more trouble than it's worth. Your best bet is to get every customer you sell a car to, to talk to all their friends about you. Cold callong is not the way to sell cars, referrals is.
 
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