Bimmerfest BMW banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I just opened the engine oil cap to top off with oil and noticed this milky stuff on the cap, I've never seen that before!
It's been very very cold here and I have not been driven my car for while and even when I did a couple of times it was a short distance and not on a highway.
After looking on YouTube, one person says that happened because of the extreme cold and the fact that I have not been driven it; therefore, moisture in the engine.
The other one that really scared me said my head casket is blown :mad:
Any feedback or anyone had similar issues who lives in a cold climate?

Btw, my car is 2011 BMW 550i XDrive, M sport.

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Monitor your coolant lever and check your exhaust for white some.
But yes, its most likely from condensation in the engine.
Take it for a long spin once a week. These engine don't love cold weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I hate to say it but it seems like you have water(coolant) going into engine that is most likely from blown head gasket. Check it out with dealer or your mechanic ASAP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Oh man, I hope it's just moisture, but how would a mechanic test for a blown head casket anyway?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Oh man, I hope it's just moisture, but how would a mechanic test for a blown head casket anyway?

Thanks
Drain the oil... Any coolant in there? That's your test. It will separate when cold so should be easy to see. It's most likely condensation, but check the oil.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Bimmerfest mobile app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,673 Posts
That's a common problem with BMW's in the winter. It's called "BMW mayonnaise." Actually, I thing it looks more like Big Mac sauce. It's condensation inside the engine that hasn't evaporated out of the oil. Take your car for a good long drive on the interstate, maybe 50 miles, and it will probably be gone. It's compounded with V8's because you carry nine quarts of oil and it takes a long time for all that oil to heat up. When you said "short trips" and "been very cold," those are classic conditions for the generation of BMW mayonnaise / Big Mac sauce.
 

·
Ziggy.
Joined
·
424 Posts
its just moisture, dont worry about it. i can tell by your description of your most recent drives that its moisture and not a headgasket issue
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you guys, I truly appreciate all that feedback, you guys are awesome!
I will start driving it at least once a week during the winter months to avoid that ****:)
And yes, it's more like a big mac sauce for sure, lol.


Again, thanks to all of you!

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
... These engine don't love cold weather.
Is there an engine that does? Diesels are even WORSE! At least our fuel doesn't turn into Jello!!



My vote, even though we consider 50ºF rather cold, is also condensation. Your driving description is the giveaway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
So, I just opened the engine oil cap to top off with oil and noticed this milky stuff on the cap, I've never seen that before!
It's been very very cold here and I have not been driven my car for while and even when I did a couple of times it was a short distance and not on a highway.
After looking on YouTube, one person says that happened because of the extreme cold and the fact that I have not been driven it; therefore, moisture in the engine.
The other one that really scared me said my head casket is blown :mad:
Any feedback or anyone had similar issues who lives in a cold climate?

Btw, my car is 2011 BMW 550i XDrive, M sport.

Thanks,
Mike
I've mentioned this in the last couple of days in a "are cold temps hard on cars" thread.

Most likely an oil/water emulsion caused by condensation from the extreme cold and no long runs.

This is also the stuff that can freeze up in CCV passages and whatnot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I think the mayo build up can also be avoided by changing oil every 5,000 to 7,500 miles which is about twice as often as is recommeded by BMW. This is especially important if the car is rarely driven for a period of time long enough to burn off water condensation that occurs in the crankcase when driving the car in cold winter temperatures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Need some help with codes I found today

Hello everyone, so, I did a scan today and came up with a few codes that I have no idea what they mean aside from the general description given by the scanner.
Here are the codes:

1) 93076A
2) 93076B
3) D86C07
4) 800334 CID
5) 8011FD
6) 801222

Thanks in advance!
Mike
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top