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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Discuss amongst yourselves... I can think of pros and cons of each scenario. In the repaired body panel situation, the stock panels (and VIN number stickers) are retained. On the downside, there may be filler used in the process. The opposite is true for the replacement body panels. No sticker, but no filler, either. Also, with the replacement body panels, they will have to blend the paint further into the other panels.

What are your thoughts on this, and which one might be better (if given the choice).

John
 

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If it were me, and the damage was bad enough to warrant filling etc, I would go for new panels.

You could remove stickers and reapply if you had to, but unless you're planning to sell,I wouldn't be to worried about it.

If you were a buyer, wouldn't you prefer, new undamaged panels as opposed to repaired stuff with a sticker?
 

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AussieZ3 said:
If it were me, and the damage was bad enough to warrant filling etc, I would go for new panels.

You could remove stickers and reapply if you had to, but unless you're planning to sell,I wouldn't be to worried about it.

If you were a buyer, wouldn't you prefer, new undamaged panels as opposed to repaired stuff with a sticker?
Those stickers are designed not to be removed in one piece. What would be their purpose if that was so easy...

Back to the original question depends a lot on what status your car has - low miles not a daily driver that has some potential for appreciation that I would try to stick with the original panels as hard as I could. If not and you do not want to sell by all means get the replacements.

Florian
 

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I think it depends on the panels (bumper covers are a whole different story than metal), the shop doing the work, and of course the price.

My body shop guy won't partially paint ('blend') any panel on my cars; it's outside his definition of quality work (and mine and my insurance adjuster's).

I'll buy a car fixed right long before I'll buy one with a lot of patchwork in the name of retaining pieces of adhesive backed paper slapped into obscure places. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, my car is not a low mileage garage queen. It's a 2002 with just over 20,000 miles. It sounds like the consensus is that retaining the OEM stickers may not be all that it's cracked up to be. We'll see what the shop says during the estimate.

dwm said:
My body shop guy won't partially paint ('blend') any panel on my cars; it's outside his definition of quality work (and mine and my insurance adjuster's).
Is it even possible to not do some blending of paint? Even if you replace a door, for example, you'd still need to blend into the front and rear quarter panel, which would now leave you with a partially (newly) painted panel. Can you please explain?

John
 

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Once I know that my black car will have year 'round covered parking, I plan on doing (having done) a full respray. Since it still has all original body panels and VIN stickers, I figure on carefully masking the stickers prior to any work.

I'm thinking about getting (thin) vinyl "machine cut" to the exact size of the existing stickers. If somebody beats me to it, I'll buy the stickers from them ;)

After the job is finished, just peel off the vinyl and the VIN sticker will still be intact.
 

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dwm said:
My body shop guy won't partially paint ('blend') any panel on my cars; it's outside his definition of quality work (and mine and my insurance adjuster's).
Let's talk about this a little. I like the spirit of what you're saying. Blending means, that at some point in the blended panel, you're spraying paint onto clearcoat, and then they're coming back and clearcoating over that whole thing. This seems kludgey in some ways.

But.. if they don't blend into the other panels you run the risk of the paint not quite matching. Especially true with today's metalic paints. But also true on something like my bright red Coupe. Red is effected by UV over time. The new red panel isn't likely to be a perfect match.

But then back to the blending thing, which just makes me shudder as well.

hmmm....
 

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I sustained damage to the front end last year at mid-ohio


The front bumper cover was replaced (plastic, and it was cracked). I had the hood replaced, the front cross member, bumber shocks, new fan, etc.

I didn't want any chance of body panels not being perfect or paint not being perfect. Everything that was broken or damaged was replaced.

When it came to paint, I did not settle for a partial respray. I had the entire car repainted. Each panel was removed, wet sanded down to get all the old paint off, reprimered, painted, cleared, and baked before reassembling to the car.

I am so glad I went all out to get the paint right. The car looks good and people keep coming up to me to ask if its a brand new car (not realizing that they don't make them anymore).


 

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Two questions:

You replaced the hood. How's the alignment / fit? With these cars, there are several places where panel alignment is critical. I'd heard a rumor a couple years ago that replacing the hood can result in mis-alignments because of the old "car wive's tale"... the manufacturer puts all the reject parts into inventory for body repair. I just don't want to believe this about my car company. I'd love to hear a good tale. Does she fit?


You say they removed the body panels to do the repaint work. Huh? Could you describe this more. I'm very interested in a repaint some day (all three cars) and am gathering information on exactly how it's done with these cars. Specifically, do you mean they completely removed every last part on the doors, for example? And what about the rear hips and side skirting. That chit is welded on.. right? Don't see how they could bake those parts. That's the car! :)
 

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TurnAround said:
Let's talk about this a little. I like the spirit of what you're saying. Blending means, that at some point in the blended panel, you're spraying paint onto clearcoat, and then they're coming back and clearcoating over that whole thing. This seems kludgey in some ways.

But.. if they don't blend into the other panels you run the risk of the paint not quite matching. Especially true with today's metalic paints. But also true on something like my bright red Coupe. Red is effected by UV over time. The new red panel isn't likely to be a perfect match.

But then back to the blending thing, which just makes me shudder as well.

hmmm....
Late reply, sorry...

Your first paragraph spells the story. Adhesion is a problem with blending. I can't count the number of blend jobs I've seen start to peel after 3 to 5 years. :(

If the paint doesn't match, the paint doesn't match. Blending in just blurs the line, but in the end it usually winds up looking worse (peeling, paint fade rate is not linear, etc). So get the best match you can, and do whole panels. That's my philosophy, and so far it's worked well for me. Once your paint is severely faded from UV exposure, do the whole car (or just the panels that have tkane the brunt of sunlight).

I've had 4 panels repainted on the roadster (steel gray metallic). Both bumper covers (rear one twice), one rear fender, and the trunk lid. Looks great. Make friends with a good body shop guy and he/she will do right by you. My guy is a stickler for quality, which doesn't make him very popular with insurance adjusters but owners love him. My car is usually the cheapest one in his shop.
 
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